Wehewehe Wikiwiki Hawaiian language dictionaries

1. nvt., To hit, strike, throw, smite, hack, thrust, toss, fling, hurl, dash, especially with a quick hard stroke; to bail water, as from a canoe; to clean, as weeds or mud from a pond; to fling the arms or swing them while walking; to make net meshes; to tie, as thatch battens; to knit; to fish with a pole; to turn the soil; to turn a rope for children to jump; to remove, as a cataract from the eye with the edge of a blade of kūkae puaʻa grass; to snare, as birds; to curse (especially if used with ʻino; cf. kāmalū); to murder; murderous; murderer, dead shot.

  • Examples:
    • Kā i ka hoe, to pull on a paddle with all one's strength.
    • Kā make loa, to dash to death, hurl down, as a foe in lua fighting; to doom to death.
    • Kā i ka nele loa, to take away everything, utterly deprive, to be without.
    • Limu kā kanaka o Manuʻakepa, the man-striking moss of Manuʻakepa [name of a famous slippery alga growing on the beach at Hanalei, Kauaʻi].
    • Kā makau, to make a fishhook of bone or other material.
    • Kā kēhau, to rub tape on grass or shrubbery to absorb the dew as a means of gathering moisture in arid places such as Kaʻu.
    • Kā koʻi, to make adzes.
    • I ke kā ʻana (For. 5:650), in tying [thatch].
  • References:
    • PPN taa.

2. nvt., Canoe bailer; to bail.

  • References:
    • PPN taa.

3. n., Beater, knee-drum beater made of dried ti leaves or braided fiber.

4. n., Cross-stitching.

5. n.v., Vine, as of sweet potato; to send out a vine, to vine, to grow into a vine.

  • Examples:
    • Ua kā nā ʻuala a kākou, our sweet potatoes have grown into vines.
  • References:

6. nvi., Root cutting, as of breadfruit; to send forth shoots.

7. n., Pelvic bone.

  • Examples:
    • He kā manu (For. 4:287), thigh of a bird [perhaps a mistranslation; ʻūhā manu in the preceding line is mistranslated leg of a bird].

8. n., Incoming, of a current (au).

9. n., Container, hanger.

10. interjection, of mild disapproval, annoyance, or surprise. Oh! So! Goodness! So that's it! Is that so! (If spoken alone it is frequently pronounced Chā! or Sah!)

  • Examples:
    • ʻO ʻoe kā! So it's you!
    • ʻOia kā! Is that it!
    • Eia aʻe nō kā! Still here!
    • ʻO kā mākou kā kāu mea i manaʻo ai (For. 4.297), so ours is what you wanted.
  • References:
    • Gram. 12.

11. possessive, Of, belonging to (a-class, Gram. 9.6), as in the possessives kā kākou, our (inclusive), kā mākou, our (exclusive); kā ka haumana puke, the student's book.

  • References:
    • PNP taʻa.

12. n., Czar.

  • Source:
    • English.

13. n., Tar, asphalt.

  • Source:
    • English.

Nā LepiliTags: flora anatomy grammar lua fighting

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kikino, Tar.

  • Source:
    • Existing dictionary word
  • References:

Papa helu loliWehewehe Wikiwiki update log

Nā LepiliTags: anatomy

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