Wehewehe Wikiwiki Hawaiian language dictionaries

1. nvi., Bonito, skipjack (Katsuwonus pelamis 🌐), an important food; to run, of aku.

  • Examples:
    • Ua aku ʻo Mahaiʻula (FS 287), bonitos are running at Mahaiʻula [place at Keāhole quadrangle, Kona, Hawaiʻi].
  • References:
    • PPN ʻatu.

2. Particle expressing direction away from the speaker, and time either past (with nei) or future (without nei, sometimes translated soon).

  • References:
    • Table 12 in Gram. 7.2.
    • PPN atu.

Nā LepiliTags: fauna fish foods Hawaiʻi grammar

Papa helu loliWehewehe Wikiwiki update log

n., An endemic lobelia (Cyanea tritomantha), a small tree 2 to 3 m high, with clustered leaves (up to 78 by 20 cm), somewhat downy beneath. The leaves were cooked and eaten like cabbage.

Nā LepiliTags: flora trees foods

Papa helu loliWehewehe Wikiwiki update log

v. To follow.

A verbal directive. See Gram. § 233, 2, and § 236. In Hawaiian, the motion or action of verbs is supposed to be towards one (mai,) or from one (aku,) or upwards (ae,) or downwards (iho,) or sideways, which is also ae. Aku is mostly connected with verbs, sometimes with nouns and adverbs; it implies motion or tendency from one, onward, &c.; as, e hele aku, to go off, go from one; the opposite of e hele mai, to come towards one. In narrative tenses the verbal directives are generally followed by the syllable la; as, hele aku la oia, he went off; noho iho la ia, he sat down, or he dwelt.

s. Name of a species of fish, smooth, round; the bonito; the name of one of the two fish that accompanied Pili in his voyage to these islands; aku helped paddle (haluku) the canoe, and opelu calmed the winds when too strong. D. Malo 4:13. See OPELU.

adj. Clear; unclouded; spoken of the moon when fully up; he aku ka mahina, the moon is clear.

Clear; unclouded; spoken of the risen moon: He aku ka mahina, the moon is clear. (Obsolete.)

A species of ocean bonito or tunny (Gyrmnosarda pela-mis), having a bluish back, silvery belly, with four brownish stripes on each side of the belly. The fish j is abundant about Hawaii in sum-mer. In ancient tradition the aku and the opelu accompanied Pili on his voyage to Hawaii. Aku helped paddle (haluku) the canoe, and opelu calmed the winds when too strong. See Opelu.

Follow, expressive of command. A sign word, as it were. The person accosted with aku was supposed to turn and follow the speaker without question. (Obsolete.)

A verbal directive. In Hawaiian, the motion or action of verbs is supposed to be towards one (mai), or from one (aku), or upwards (ae), or downwards (iho), or sideways, which is also (ae). Aku is generally connected with verbs, but sometimes with nouns and adverbs. It implies motion or tendency from one, onward, etc.; as, e hele aku, to go off, go from one; the opposite of e hele mai, to come towards one. In narrative teases the verbal directives are generally followed by the syllable la: as, hele aku la oia, he went off; noho iho la ia, he sat down, or he dwelt.

No nā lepiliRegarding tags: Pili piha a pili hapa paha kēia mau lepe i nā hua o luna aʻe nei.Tags may apply to all or only some of the tagged entries.

E huli iā “aku” ma Ulukau.

Search for “aku” on Ulukau.

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