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ʻakaʻakai

/ ʻakaʻa.kai / Pukui-Elbert Haw to Eng,

Perhaps akaakai. An ambiguous passage in For. 4:157: maluna o ka waʻa naku akaakai … kona waʻa akaakai, in the bulrush canoe … his bulrush canoe. (Reference is to a canoe bound for Kahiki to search for ʻOlopana. Thrum's note [For. 4:156] says that canoes were not made of bulrushes and thinks naku here is ‘to search’ [see naku #2]. An alternative interpretation of akaakai is akaaka, clear, + -i, transitivizer, which might also mean ‘search’ in the sense of clarification.)

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ʻakaʻakai

/ ʻakaʻa.kai / Pukui-Elbert Haw to Eng,

1. n., The great bulrush (Scirpus validus 🌐, formerly called S. lacustris) that grows on the edge of fresh or brackish water marshes in Hawaiʻi. The plants have unbranched, slender, green stems, 1 to 3 m high, looking like giant onion plants. Formerly Hawaiians used them for house thatch or plaited them into mats for the lower layers of beds or for some temporary purposes, as the material is not durable.

  • Examples:
    • ʻAi ʻakaʻakai, to eat bulrushes [fresh poi, which was not liked].
  • References:
    • Neal 88.

2. n., The common onion (Allium cepa 🌐); the tops look like those of the great bulrush.

  • References:
    • Neal 198.

Nā LepiliTags: flora Niʻihau

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See ilo ʻakaʻakai, lina, ʻoʻa.

No nā lepiliRegarding tags: Pili piha a pili hapa paha kēia mau lepe i nā hua o luna aʻe nei.Tags may apply to all or only some of the tagged entries.

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