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Annual Security and Fire Safety Report

Download the 2018 UH Hilo Annual Security and Fire Safety Report (PDF).

Policy for Preparing the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report and Disclosure of Crime Statistics

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo (UH Hilo) is dedicated to providing a safe and secure campus environment for all students, faculty, staff and visitors. The information in this report has been prepared to ensure that UH Hilo is in compliance with the federal guidelines under the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990 (renamed Clery Act in 1998), the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act amendment of 2013, and in accordance with the 2016 Department of Education Campus Safety and Security Reporting Handbook. This report includes crime statistics for the previous three years that occurred on campus and on public property adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

Information for obtaining a copy of the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is made available to all students, faculty and staff by email with a link to the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report by September 30th each year. A link to the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report is listed in the online enrollment application and employment application for prospective students and employees, respectively. The report is readily accessible 24 hours a day at the Security Office in the University Classroom Building (Building 301), Room 151 and is also available on the UH Hilo Security website.

Campus Security (Jurisdiction, Enforcement, Arrest Powers)

The mission of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Security department is to provide a safe campus that is conducive to a teaching, learning and working environment by providing quality service and a secure campus for all students and the UH Hilo community.

The UH Hilo Security Department does not employ commissioned police officers; however, it does maintain a 24-hour security department that patrols the main campus and several off-site locations. The University will finalize its hiring of a full staff of in-house Security Officers by the fall 2018 semester and will utilize certified contract security staff for extra duty and special events, as needed.

The UH Hilo Security Department enforces the University of Hawaiʻi System policies and regulations, as well as UH Hilo Rules and Standard Administrative Procedures. The local law enforcement agency is the sole law enforcement authority at each location. Refer to Contact Information for local law enforcement agency contact information and address. Each law enforcement agency is ready to assist 24 hours a day, every day of the year. Each law enforcement agency reports statistics to the Clery Compliance Officer. Local law enforcement agencies employ commissioned police officers and may respond to all criminal activity on the campus for which they have authority. Local law enforcement agencies have full arrest powers on the Hilo campus and are authorized to carry firearms. UH Hilo security officers conduct preventive patrol throughout the buildings.

UH Hilo security officers have the authority to ask persons for identification and to determine whether individuals have lawful business at each campus. The security officers have the authority to issue parking tickets; however, they do not possess arrest power. Criminal incidents are referred to the local law enforcement agency that has jurisdiction on the respective campus. UH Hilo security office maintains a highly professional working relationship with each local law enforcement agency. All crime victims and witnesses are strongly encouraged to immediately report the crime to the UH Hilo security office and the local law enforcement agency. Prompt reporting will assure timely warning notices on-campus and timely disclosure of crime statistics.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo has developed its own streamlined incident reporting process for compiling data for the public daily crime log, information dissemination, and communication of security and safety issues, including timely warnings.

Emergency Contacts

Contact Number(s)
Police, Fire, Ambulance 911
Campus Security (on-campus) ext. 7911
Campus Security (off-campus) (808) 974-7911
Director of Campus Security (808) 932-7644 or (808) 561-3809
Chancellor (808) 932-7344
Vice Chancellor of Administrative Affairs (808) 932-7650
Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs (808) 932-7332
Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs (808) 932-7445
Title IX Coordinator (808) 932-7641
Environmental Health and Safety (808) 692-7638
Auxiliary Services (808) 932-7009
UH Hilo Student Medical Services (808) 932-7369
UH Hilo Counseling Services (808) 932-7465
UH Hilo Disability Services (808) 932-7623
Suicide & Crisis Line (808) 832-3100
Help Line (for referrals) 211 or 275-2000 (Ask-2000)
YWCA Sexual Assault 24-hour Crisis Line (808) 935-0677
Sex Abuse Treatment Center (hotline) (808) 524-7273
Child Protective Services (808) 832-5300
Civil Defense Agency (808) 935-0031

Interagency Relationships

The UH Hilo has Memoranda of Understanding for the investigation of alleged criminal offenses with local law enforcement agencies and security maintains a close working relationship with each local, state and federal law enforcement agency. The Hawaiʻi Police Department is the primary law enforcement agency on the Hilo campus.

HAWAIʻI POLICE DEPARTMENT
349 Kapiʻolani Street, Hilo, HI 96720

In emergency situations, the Hawaiʻi Police Department may be reached by dialing 911 from any campus phone.

Hawaiʻi Community College (Hawaiʻi CC) conducts academic programs on the Hilo campus. Due to this activity the UH Hilo currently possesses an agreement with Hawaiʻi CC Security Staff that when they are present on the Hilo campus they will assist as needed.

Monitoring of Criminal Activity at Student Organization Locations by Local Law Enforcement

UH Hilo does not have off-campus student organizations.

Incident Reporting

Crime Reporting Procedures

The campus community (faculty, staff and students) is encouraged to report all crimes to the security department in a timely manner. Crimes should be reported to the security department to ensure inclusion in the annual crime statistics. Security officers are available 24 hours a day year-round at the Hilo campus. Crimes can be reported to the Director of Security or the security department by phone, stopping and approaching an officer on patrol or going to the security office in person.

Blue Light Emergency Phones

The Hilo campus maintains blue light emergency phones that provide direct communication to the security office, which can notify local law enforcement. The blue light emergency phones are tested monthly.

Confidential Reporting

UH Hilo is a state agency, and all attempts to keep information reported as confidential will be handled as such. However, UH Hilo must abide by the Hawaiʻi Uniform Information Practices Act and disclose all information when a formal request is made. UH Hilo does not have pastoral counselors, as defined by the Clery Act. UH Hilo does have professional counselors. The recommendation for anyone in a counseling endeavor is to inform persons being counseled of the procedures to report crimes on a voluntary basis for inclusion into the annual crime statistics.

When to Call Security

  • All emergencies including medical, fire and accidents.
  • A firearm or weapon is seen in a room or on a person.
  • Someone is displaying any type of unusual behavior.
  • Someone states he/she wishes to hurt themselves or others.
  • Suspicious persons in suspicious places.
  • You or someone else is threatened with violence.
  • You or someone you know is a victim of violence.
  • Someone is harassing/stalking you or someone you know.
  • A stranger entering your co-worker’s workspace when you know they are gone.
  • A person screaming (it may indicate they need help).
  • Anyone looking into car window or trying door handles.
  • The sound of breaking glass or other loud noises that may indicate an accident or other crime.
  • Persons loitering around the building.
  • Someone forcing entry into the building, car or vending machine.
  • Anytime you feel unsafe or notice something that does not appear right.

Information Needed by Security

  • What happened?
  • When?
  • Where?
  • Is anyone injured?
  • Vehicle license number
  • Direction of travel
  • Description of persons (including clothing)
  • When describing suspects, notice age, race, sex, height and weight. Compare your weight and height with the suspect. Pick out some unique characteristics that will help you identify the suspect in the future.

Security Response

If a crime or emergency occurs on the Hilo campus, call the security desk or local law enforcement agency.

Security officers are available 24 hours a day at the Hilo Campus. In response to a call, security officers will take the required action, dispatching an officer to file an incident report and/or asking the victim to report to the local law enforcement agency for further investigation.

Security incident reports may be forwarded to Vice Chancellors and Department Heads for review and potential action when appropriate. Security officers will investigate, or assist the local law enforcement agency if necessary, and report when it is deemed appropriate or requested by the victim. Additional information obtained via the investigation will also be forwarded to the appropriate administrators.

Emergency Notification and Response

Emergency Response

UH Hilo’s Emergency Operations Plan includes general information about situational and operational requirements, and incident priorities and responsibilities. Individual departments are responsible for developing contingency and continuity of operations plans for their staff including specific areas of responsibility. UH Hilo conducts annual assessments of our Emergency Operations Plan, including tabletop discussions, field exercises, and tests of the emergency notification systems. These tests are designed to evaluate the emergency response plans and capabilities of the institution.

UH Hilo Campus Security staff has received training in the National Incident Management System, Incident Command System and are able to respond to incidents on campus. When a serious incident occurs that poses an immediate threat to the UH Hilo community, first responders to the scene are usually UH Hilo Campus Security Officers, Hawaiʻi Police Department (HPD), Hawaiʻi Fire Department (HFD), and Hawaiʻi Emergency Medical Services Department (EMS). These agencies respond and work together to manage the incident. Depending on the nature of the incident, other UH Hilo departments and local or federal agencies may also be involved in incident response.

General information about the emergency response and evacuation procedures for the University is publicized each year in the Annual Security & Fire Safety Report, as part of our Clery Act compliance efforts, and is available on the University website.

Detailed information and updates to the Emergency Operations Plan and UH Alert System are available on the following websites:

Notification About an Immediate Threat

In the event of an immediate threat, UH Hilo Campus Security, the Office of Administrative Affairs, and UH Hilo Public Relations staff receive information from various offices/departments on campus, such as the Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHSO), or from the County of Hawaiʻi Department of Emergency Management and/or the State of Hawaiʻi Civil Defense Agency.

If UH Hilo Administration or Campus Security confirms that there is an emergency or dangerous situation that poses an immediate threat to the health or safety of some or all members of the UH Hilo community, Campus Security, Administration, and Public Relations offices will collaborate to determine the content of the message and will use some or all of the systems described below to communicate the threat to the UH Hilo community or, if the threat is limited to a particular building or segment of the population, to the appropriate segment of the community. Notifications are issued immediately, accounting for the safety of the community, unless issuing a notification will, in the judgment of the first responders (including, but not limited to UH Hilo Campus Security, HPD, and/or HFD and EMS), compromise the efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to, or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

Emergency Alerts & Timely Warnings

In the event of a serious incident that poses an immediate threat to members of the UH Hilo community, the university has various systems in place for communicating information quickly. Some or all of the following communication methods may be activated: social media, network emails, written bulletins, emergency notification units, and text messages. Students, faculty and staff with a UH username and password can sign up for the text message UH Alert service on the UH Alert website. Community members who do not have a UH username or password can receive emergency alerts and updates through our social networking pages, the UH Hilo website, and the Emergency Notification Units spread throughout the Campus.

Students, faculty, staff, and visitors are encouraged to notify Campus Security of any situation or incident on campus that involves a significant emergency or dangerous situation that poses an immediate or ongoing threat to the health and safety of students and/or employees on campus. Campus Security has the responsibility of responding to and summoning the necessary resources to mitigate, investigate, and document any situation that may cause a significant emergency or dangerous situation. In addition, UH Hilo Campus Security has a responsibility to respond to such incidents to determine if the situation does, in fact, pose a threat to the community. If so, federal law requires that the institution notify the campus community or the appropriate segments of the community that may be affected by the situation.

Remember, Campus Safety begins with YOU, so “If You See Something, Say Something.”

Students, faculty, and staff are encouraged to report any strange activities or crimes that occur on campus, by calling Campus Security directly at (808) 974-7911. The university will withhold as confidential the names of victims in all emergency alerts and timely warnings.

UH Alert

In accordance with the Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA), the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo will endeavor to immediately notify the campus community upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation on campus. The university has implemented a comprehensive communications system, UH Alert, to provide prompt warning notifications and alerts of emergencies to the campus community using a variety of methods, including: email notices, text messages, university website and social media postings, Emergency Notification Units, and direct communication through staff members UH Hilo Campus Security can initiate some or all of the notification systems to inform the campus community of emergencies or dangerous situations that have occurred which necessitate caution, evacuation, or other action on the part of students, employees, and campus visitors. Upon confirmation of an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on campus, University officials will, without delay, and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the system(s) unless issuing the notification will, in the professional judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim, or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency. When the emergency is declared over, and the situation returned to normal, an announcement using the same dissemination methods listed above will be used to declare the “all-clear.” Depending on the nature of the situation, the media will be used to notify the local community. Student Housing Services maintains a parent organization to notify parents of emergency situations and all-clear notices.

Timely Warning

To keep the community informed of security issues, “timely warning” bulletins are issued. A warning may be issued when there is an occurrence of a “Clery” reportable crime or any other crime considered by the institution to represent a threat to students or employees. Typically, a timely warning is issued when a situation poses a threat to students, but it is not an emergency requiring immediate action. This warning may be distributed to the campus community using some or all the following methods of communication: email notices, written bulletins, and social media postings.

Circumstances for which a timely warning will be issued include, but are not limited to, the receipt of a good faith report to the security office or other campus security authorities of a crime reportable under the Clery Act that poses continuing threat to the campus community. The Vice Chancellor of Administrative Affairs and the Director of Security are responsible for determining if a timely warning will be issued. The determination will be made on a case-by-case basis after due consideration of all available facts of the crime, such as the nature of the crime and whether a continuing danger to the campus community exists.

Timely warnings will be issued through the UH Hilo email system to the students, faculty and staff of the respective campus. Timely warnings will contain sufficient information about the nature of an identified threat to assist members of the campus in taking appropriate action to protect themselves or their property. The timely warning will generally include:

  • Date and time or timeframe of the incident;
  • A brief description of the incident;
  • Information that will promote safety and potentially aid in the prevention of similar crimes (crime prevention or safety tips);
  • Suspect description(s) when deemed appropriate and if there is sufficient detail;
  • Local law enforcement and UH HILO security contact information;
  • Other information as deemed appropriate by the Cleary Compliance Officer or designee.

It is important to note that in some cases, security may need to withhold some facts if releasing the information would compromise an ongoing investigation or the identity of the victim.

Crime Log

A daily crime log is at the security desk at the Hilo Campus 24 hours a day and online. The information in the daily crime log includes the case number, classification, date reported, date occurred, time occurred, general location and disposition of each reported crime.

Emergency Response & Evacuation Testing Procedures

An evacuation (fire) drill is coordinated by UH Hilo Student Housing Services staff in collaboration with UH Hilo Fire Safety Program each semester for all student housing facilities. Thus, the emergency response and evacuation procedures are tested at least twice each year (during fall and spring semesters). Students learn the locations of the emergency exits in the buildings and are provided guidance about the direction they should travel when exiting each facility for a short-term building evacuation.

During evacuation tests, drills may be announced or unannounced. The purpose of evacuation drills is to prepare building occupants for an organized evacuation in the case of a fire or other emergency. At UH Hilo, evacuation drills are used to educate and train occupants on fire safety issues specific to their building. During the drill, occupants practice drill procedures and familiarize themselves with the location of exits and the sound of the fire alarm. In addition to educating the occupants of each building about the evacuation procedures during the drills, the process also provides the university an opportunity to test the operation of fire alarm system components. Evacuation drills are conducted by the UH Hilo Department of Campus Security and the Student Housing Services department to evaluate emergency plans and responses. Each test is documented, including the date, time, description of the exercise, and whether it was announced or unannounced.

Emergency Response Guidebook

The safety and security of the students, faculty, staff and visitors at UH Hilo is always a priority, and we should all be prepared to keep our campus safe. This information is disseminated to assist you in your ability to respond to several types of emergencies. Please familiarize yourself with the procedures in this guidebook. In the event you are faced with an emergency, it will serve as a quick reference for effective action. If there are any questions or comments regarding this guidebook, please contact: Campus Security Office at (808) 974-7911 or 7911. This emergency guidebook was created by the UH Hilo Campus Security Department.

Criminal Activity

Crime in Progress

  1. Do not attempt to apprehend or interfere with a suspected criminal except in cases of self-protection.
  2. If safe, get a good description of the criminal. Note size, height, weight, gender, color of skin, hair, facial hair, eyes, age, clothing, distinguishing characteristics or marks, and method and direction of travel. If there is a vehicle involved, note its license plate number, make and model, color, and outstanding characteristics.
  3. In an emergency, dial 9-1-1. For UH Hilo Campus Security, use the closest Emergency Call Box (ECB) or call (808) 974-7911 for help. Inform the dispatcher of your situation, provide your name and location, and then remain where you are until contacted by a security officer.
  4. If you are involved in a monetary theft, you should:
    • Not resist — do as the perpetrator says.
    • Give up the money immediately.
    • Wait until the perpetrator departs, then contact the Hawaiʻi Police Department or Campus Security immediately.
    • Attempt to get a good description of the perpetrator and direction of flight. Write down any information about the suspect that you can remember (see above).
    • Ask any witness(es) to remain for the arrival of Campus Security and/or HPD.
  5. In the event of a civil disturbance, continue with a normal routine as much as possible. If the disturbance is outside, stay away from doors and windows.
  6. Do not interfere with persons creating the disturbance, or with law enforcement authorities on the scene.

Crime Reporting Policy

Crimes and other emergencies can be reported directly to Campus Security by dialing (808) 974-7911 or extension 47911 from any phone on campus, by using an Emergency Call Box (ECB), or through the UH Hilo Campus Security App. Crimes can also be reported directly to the Hawaiʻi Police Department by dialing 911. We encourage the community to report crimes immediately and accurately to Campus Security for issuing emergency alerts and timely warnings.

The Campus Security Department accepts reports of criminal activity in confidence; crimes of sexual violence may be reported by a third party and/or anonymously. The UH Hilo website has a Silent Witness and anonymous reporting option where an individual can report a crime, incident, or sexual assault anonymously. Additionally, anonymous reports can be made through the UH Hilo Title IX Office, Confidential Advocate, and UH Hilo Counseling Services.

Campus Security requests that all campus counselors encourage their clients, when appropriate, to report criminal violations on a voluntary, confidential basis for inclusion in the annual disclosure of crime statistics. However, pastoral and professional counselors are exempt from reporting obligations and may choose to withhold statistics at their discretion.

Campus Security Authority

Campus Security Authority (CSA)” is a Clery Act-specific term that encompasses four groups of individuals and organizations associated with an institution. An official is defined as any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the institution.

CSA Defined

  • All individuals who work for UH Hilo's Campus Security Department are campus security authorities.
  • Any official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including, but not limited to, student housing, student discipline and campus judicial proceedings, student athletics, and personnel who are in positions of responsibility over students at off campus and on campus events and activities.
  • Any individual or organization to whom or to which the campus community has been directed to report criminal incidents in addition to the security department personnel.
  • Any individual who has responsibility for campus security but who does not constitute a campus security department (e.g., an individual who is responsible for monitoring the entrance into institutional property). Include individuals such as those who provide security or monitor access into a campus facility; act as event security, such as for sporting events or large registered parties, or escort students around campus after dark (including other students).

Because official responsibilities and job titles vary significantly on campuses, the law does not state a list of specific job titles. To determine specifically which individuals or organizations are campus security authorities for your institution, consider the function of that individual or office. Look for officials (i.e., not support staff) whose functions involve relationships with students. If someone has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, he or she is a campus security authority. Note that whether or not your institution pays an individual is not a factor in determining whether that individual is a CSA. Be sure to keep your CSA list current so that you do not omit any individual or organization that fits the definition of a CSA.

Examples of individuals (outside of the security department) who generally meet the criteria for being campus security authorities include

  • a dean or director who oversees student housing, a student center, student affairs, student discipline, or student extracurricular activities
  • a director of athletics, all athletic coaches (including part-time employees and graduate assistants)
  • a faculty advisor to a student group
  • a coordinator or director of a student group
  • a student resident advisor and assistant
  • a student who monitors access to dormitories or buildings that are owned by recognized student organizations
  • a Title IX coordinator
  • an ombudsperson (including student ombudspersons)
  • a director of a campus health center and counseling center
  • victim advocates or others who are responsible for assisting with housing relocation, disciplinary action or court cases, etc.
  • members of a sexual assault response team (SART) or other sexual assault advocates
  • officers from local law enforcement who are contracted by the institution to provide campus safety-related services
  • a physician/nurse in a campus health center
  • a counselor, including peer counselor (except for professional or pastoral counselors addressed later in this chapter)
  • a health educator, including peer health educators

Examples of individuals who would not meet the criteria for being campus security authorities include

  • a faculty member who does not have any responsibility for student and campus activity beyond the classroom
  • clerical or cafeteria staff

Institutions are advised to reevaluate the CSA status of all employees (including student employees) on at least an annual basis and document the rationale of the determinations. Please note that, while there may be some overlap, persons considered to be CSAs for Clery Act reporting are not necessarily the same as those defined as “responsible employees” for Title IX.

What a CSA does

The function of a campus security authority is to report those allegations of Clery Act crimes to the official or office designated by the institution to collect crime report information, such as the campus security department or a designated CSA. CSAs are obligated by law to report to the Campus Security Office allegations of Clery Act crimes that are reported to them in their capacity as a CSA. CSAs must report third party allegations only if the reporting party is a reputable source such as an outside counseling agency, doctor, or anyone in a position of similar responsibility.

What a CSA does not do

  • CSAs are not responsible for investigating any incident.
  • CSAs are not responsible for reporting incidents that they overhear students talking about in a hallway conversation.
  • CSAs are not responsible for reporting incidents that a classmate or student mentions during an in-class discussion.
  • CSAs are not responsible for reporting incidents that a victim mentions during a speech, workshop, or any other form of group presentation.
  • CSAs are not responsible for reporting incidents that the CSA otherwise learns about in an indirect manner.
  • A campus security authority is not responsible for determining authoritatively whether a crime took place; that is the function of law enforcement personnel.
  • A campus security authority should not try to apprehend the alleged perpetrator of the crime. That, too, is the responsibility of law enforcement.
  • It is also not a CSA’s responsibility to try and convince a victim to contact law enforcement if the victim chooses not to do so.

Examples of Collecting Crime Information

  • Scenario 1: A resident assistant (RA) who has been identified as a CSA is told by a fellow student that she has been raped and is seeking emotional and medical support. The resident assistant should forward the report to the institution’s designated official for inclusion in the statistics regardless of whether the victim chooses to file a report with law enforcement or press charges. Note: The RA must advise the victim that the crime will be reported and that no information regarding the victim will be disclosed unless the victim provides written approval for the CSA to do so.
  • Scenario 2: A student mentions to her boyfriend that a number of rooms on her dorm floor were broken into during the previous night’s football game. Later that day, her boyfriend tells the athletics director (AD) what he heard. The AD asks which dorm it was and what, if anything else, the boyfriend knows about the incident. The AD should document the information and forward it to the school’s campus security department or the institution’s designated official for inclusion in the statistics per the university's crime reporting policy.
  • Scenario 3: Ms. Jones, Director of Student Housing, gets a call from the director of a counseling center in town. The caller wants to let the director know that four students from the school sought assistance at the center and told the center’s counselors that they had been sexually assaulted on campus and were seeking emotional support. They did not want police investigations. Even though these are third-party reports, Ms. Jones, believing the report was made in good faith, documents all of the information she was given and forwards the reports to the person or office responsible for collecting Clery Act crime reports at her institution. At UH Hilo, that is the Campus Security Office.
  • Scenario 4: Jane, a resident advisor, is attending a “Take Back the Night” rally at her school. She attends the event as a participant and is not involved in providing any counseling services. As part of the event’s programming, a student gives a speech in which she says that she was raped on campus last year. In response to hearing the speech, three other students decide to address the crowd and disclose their own experiences being sexually assaulted. After the event, Jane returns to her room where a student from her housing facility knocks on her door and tells her that she was sexually assaulted at an on-campus party in another housing facility three months ago. Jane should forward the report of the incident that was reported to her as she was acting in her capacity as an RA for her housing facility. Jane should not report the sexual assaults that she heard discussed at the" Take Back the Night" event.

Exemption for Pastoral and Professional Counselors

To be exempt from disclosing reported offenses, the individual must be acting in the role of a professional counselor: one who provides mental health counseling to members of the institution's community. State licensing requirements for professional counselors typically include completion of a minimum of 3,000 hours of post-master’s degree supervised clinical experience, performed within two years before a license is awarded. If an unlicensed counselor has completed master’s degree course work and is acting in the role of a licensed counselor under the supervision of a licensed professional in order to gain the required supervised clinical experience in a two-year period, he or she would be exempt from CSA requirements. An example is a Ph.D. counselor-trainee acting under the supervision of a professional counselor at the institution.

  • Scenario 1: A dean of students who has a professional counselor’s license but is employed by the institution only as a dean and not as a counselor, is not exempt from reporting.
  • Scenario 2: If that same dean is employed by the institution as both a professional counselor and an academic counselor and learns of a criminal incident while engaged in academic counseling, that dean is not exempt from reporting the incident.
  • Scenario 3: If your institution has an individual with dual roles, one as a professional or pastoral counselor and the other as an official who qualifies as a CSA, and the roles cannot be separated, that individual is considered a CSA and is not exempt from reporting Clery Crimes.

In most cases it is possible for a CSA to fulfill his or her responsibilities while still maintaining victim confidentiality. CSA reports are used by the institution to compile statistics for Clery Act reporting and to help determine if there is a serious or continuing threat to the safety of the campus community that would require an alert (i.e., a timely warning or emergency notification). Those responsibilities can usually be met without disclosing personally identifying information

Crime Prevention and Awareness Programs

The Security Department and Student Health and Wellness Programs (SHWP) occasionally host workshops and learning events. A current list of courses being offered is available online.

As part of the crime prevention program, campus security offers security surveys for workspaces and buildings.

Securing Campus Facilities

The facilities of all campuses are well maintained. Students, faculty, and staff have access to all academic and administrative facilities. Access to private offices and certain other areas are restricted through the issuance of keys and or access cards. Visitors to the campus have access to those areas officially opened for study, work or related functions. Security patrols the property 24 hours a day, seven days a week at the Hilo campus.

Security Considerations Used in Maintenance

Security works closely with other departments to maintain a safe campus. Security personnel coordinates the repair of locks and doors that are not working properly, check the campus lighting on a regular basis and inform campus operations of all non-working lights. The campus community is encouraged to report all safety concerns to Offices of Security, Campus Operations or Environmental Health and Safety.

Weapons/Alcohol/Drugs

Weapons

The use, possession, or carrying of any kind of firearm or illegal and dangerous weapons on the property of an institution of higher education is a violation of state laws and the University of Hawaiʻi System policies and is strictly prohibited. Illegal and dangerous weapons include, but are not limited to, firearms, ammunition, spear guns, explosives, tasers, and dangerous substances. Any person found in violation may be subject to all applicable state and federal laws, university policy, and the Student Conduct Code. Should you suspect or discover someone on campus in possession of a weapon, contact UH Hilo Campus Security immediately. Violations may result in an arrest and/or suspension from UH Hilo. Since 2003, public displays of any type of “replica” firearm are illegal; this includes pellet, air, water, and toy guns.

Drug and Alcohol Use

The UH Hilo prohibits the illicit use, sale, attempted sale, conveyance, distribution, manufacture, cultivation, dispensation, purchase, attempted purchase, and possession of illegal drugs, intoxicants or controlled substances at any time and in any amount or in any manner. Illicit drugs include all drugs for which possession is illegal under federal or state law, including prescription drugs for which the individual does not have a valid prescription.

The purchase, consumption and possession of alcoholic beverages in facilities under the control of UH Hilo shall in all respects comply with state laws and with guidelines as defined in System Policy and Regulation. Misconduct may result in arrests and/or disciplinary action and penalties. Among the violations that could result in penalties are:

  • The purchase, consumption, possession or transportation of alcoholic beverages by anyone under age 21.
  • The furnishing of alcoholic beverages to anyone under age 21.
  • Public Intoxication as defined by State Law

Consumption of alcoholic beverages shall be limited to the areas designated by the UH Hilo and shall be subject to all requirements of state law, local laws and UH Hilo regulations. Any use of alcoholic beverages should be in moderation. Loud or disruptive behaviors, interference with cleanliness of facilities, or drinking habits that are harmful to the health or education of an individual or those around him/her are reasons for appropriate disciplinary action by UH Hilo administration.

Drugs

The use, possession, consumption, sale, manufacture, or furnishing of illicit drugs and narcotics, including marijuana and drug paraphernalia, is prohibited by state law and UH Hilo regulations. Violations may result in arrest, suspension or the completion of a mandatory drug and alcohol education program.

Substance Abuse Programs

Substance abuse programs are held by University staff several times a year and may be attended by UH Hilo students. Student Health and Wellness Programs (SHWP) provides systems of holistic care that integrate education and prevention efforts with medical and mental health services, programs, and activities.

University Policy on Drugs

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo recognizes its duty to uphold existing State and Federal laws regarding the unlawful possession, use, and sale of marijuana, hallucinogens, and other drugs, and cannot protect any member of UH Hilo community who violates the law.

Accordingly, any person discovered on campus by College officials in illegal possession of marijuana, hallucinogens, or any of the other drugs proscribed by the penal law will be subject to sanctions up to and including expulsion from UH Hilo. In every case, the drugs found will be turned over to the proper authorities and, should the facts warrant, the person as well will be turned over to the proper authorities.

Any student arrested by civil authorities in connection with illegal possession or use of drugs will be subject to disciplinary action by UH Hilo if it is judged that his/her actions have been detrimental to the general welfare of UH Hilo community, or that his/her general mode of life has rendered him/her unfit to pursue the normal College program.

Should guests, or anyone purporting to be a guest of students or of anyone else in UH Hilo community, bring drugs on campus, UH Hilo will take immediate action by notifying the proper authorities. Since UH Hilo does not consider itself a “sanctuary” outside the law for its own students, faculty or staff, neither can it be a place of refuge for persons not a part of UH Hilo community. Loitering on campus is subject to the specifics of penal law in this regard, and UH Hilo recognizes its freedom to act within the context of this law.

Standards of Conduct/Prohibition of Illicit Drug Use

The use, consumption, sale, purchase, possession, manufacture or distribution of illegal drugs, drug paraphernalia, and/or alcohol while on University property or while engaged in University activities is prohibited. All students and team members are subject to this policy and to applicable federal, state and local laws related to this matter. Any violation of this policy may result in disciplinary actions as set forth in the applicable sections of this policy. UH Hilo recognizes that students and team members may, in accordance with the federal, state and local laws, choose to use alcohol on their own time. Additionally, the University retains the right to grant limited exceptions to this policy only for the moderate consumption of alcohol during University-sponsored events or meals at which the University deems such moderate consumption to be acceptable.

Resources and Referrals

Campus Resources

Counseling Services offers resources, workshops, group and individual counseling, and referral for members of UH Hilo community regarding substance use and abuse.

Workshops to provide educational information and encourage preventative attitudes and behaviors are open to all students. Topics include creating social alternatives to alcohol-related activities, learning to manage stress without alcohol or drugs, recognizing the warning signs of substance abuse in self and others, intervening when friends or family members appear to be engaged in alcohol or substance abuse, and understanding issues of adult children of alcoholics. Counseling is available to all enrolled students. Referral to community resources is available to all enrolled students. All referrals respect the privacy of the individual and counseling is confidential.

Alcohol and Drug Resources

  • Alcoholics Anonymous is a self-help program which offers support and assistance for those with alcohol dependency;
  • Al-Anon provides mutual support and assistance to families and friends of alcoholics. To find a local meeting, please call 1-888-4AL-ANON (1-888-425-2666).
  • Alateen is a self-help group for children of alcoholic parents, led by non-professionals who have had similar experiences. To find a local meeting, please call 1-888-4AL-ANON (1-888-425-2666).
  • Al-Anon Family Group Headquarters, Inc., 888-425-2666, is part of the support network. This phone number has an automated service which will provide demographic information on meetings in any locale simply by entering your zip code. There is no fee for this service or for Al-Anon.

The resources listed above have been compiled with the intent of centralizing publicly available resources that may be useful to our students. It should be noted, however, that UH Hilo does not endorse any of the resources on the list. Students are implored to discern the organizations’ offerings to determine appropriateness for their individual circumstance. UH Hilo does not accept liability for any activities of students or institutions in connection with these resources or their representatives. Additionally, we strive to maintain accuracy. Please notify us if you encounter any discrepancies or difficulties.

Drug and Alcohol Counseling, Treatment, and Rehabilitation

UH Hilo urges individuals with substance abuse problems to seek assistance and support. Students are encouraged to seek help through available national and community resources and hotlines including, but not limited to, the following examples:

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence, Inc. (NCAD)
Telephone: 1-800-NCA-CALL (622-2255)
NCAD Website
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Telephone: 1-800-662-HELP (4357)
SAMHSA Website
SAMHSA Treatment Finder
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Telephone: 1-800-662-HELP (4357)
NIAAA Website
NIAAA Treatment Finder
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Telephone: 1-800-662-HELP (4357)
NIDA Website
Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)
Telephone: see local telephone directories
AA Website
Al-Anon
Telephone: 1-888-425-2666
National Cocaine Hotline
Telephone: 1-800-COCAINE (262-2463)

University Employees are eligible to participate in the University’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Faculty and Staff are encouraged to contact Human Resources with additional questions.

Alcohol Screening
To complete a free, anonymous, alcohol screening, please visit AlcoholScreening.org.
Drug Screening
To complete a free, anonymous, drug screening, please visit DrugScreening.org.
The Medicine Abuse Project
The Medicine Abuse Project website includes information about prevention of prescription drug abuse, painkiller addiction, and over-the-counter (OTC) medicine abuse. It provides information about how to dispose of medicine and how to safeguard the medicine in your home, as well as lists medicine abuse facts and includes comprehensive information about the most abused prescription drugs.

Preventing Abuse

While it's practically impossible to prevent anyone and everyone from using alcohol and drugs, here are five ways to help prevent alcohol and drug abuse.

Effectively deal with peer pressure

The biggest reason individuals start using alcohol and drugs is because their friends utilize peer pressure. No one likes to be left out, and people find themselves doing things they normally wouldn't do, just to fit in. In these cases, you need to either find a better group of friends that won't pressure you into doing harmful things, or you need to find a good way to say no. Prepare a good excuse or plan ahead of time to keep from giving into tempting situations.

Deal with life pressure

People today are overworked and overwhelmed, and often feel like a good break or a reward is deserved. But in the end, alcohol and drugs only make life more stressful - and many all too often fail to recognize this in the moment. To prevent using alcohol and drugs as a reward, find other ways to handle stress and unwind. Take up exercising, read a good book, volunteer with the needy, and create something. Anything positive and relaxing helps take the mind off using alcohol and drugs to relieve stress.

Seek help for mental illness

Mental illness and substance abuse often go hand-in-hand. Those with a mental illness may turn to alcohol and drugs as a way to ease the pain. Those suffering from some form of mental illness, such as anxiety, depression or post-traumatic stress disorder should seek the help of a trained professional for treatment before it leads to substance abuse.

Examine the risk factors

If you're aware of the biological, environmental and physical risk factors you possess, you're more likely to overcome them. A history of substance abuse in the family, living in a social setting that glorifies alcohol and drug abuse and/or family life that models alcohol and drug abuse can be risk factors.

Keep a well-balanced life

People take up alcohol and drugs when something in their life is not working, or when they're unhappy about their lives or where their lives are going. Look at life's big picture, and have priorities in order.

How much is too much?

Sanctions

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo subscribes to the Drug-Free Work Place Act of 1988 (34CFR, Part 85, Subpart F), the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public Law 101-226) and section 5301 of the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988. UH Hilo strictly prohibits the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees on its property or as part of any of its activities per UH Policies; The University will impose disciplinary sanctions on students and employees (consistent with local, state, and federal law), up to and including dismissal from the University or termination of employment and referral for prosecution, for violation of these standards of conduct. Disciplinary sanctions may also include the completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program.

Description of Sanctions for Drug and Alcohol Abuse

Federal law makes it a criminal offense to manufacture, distribute, dispense, or possess with intent to manufacture, distribute or dispense, or simply possess a controlled substance. See Title 21 U.S. Code section 801, et seq. Controlled substances are defined by the schedules contained in section 812 of Title 21 of the U.S. Code.

The possible sanctions for the violation of Federal and State law depend upon the particular offense violated. The various offenses are premised on aggravating factors which include the type and quantity of drugs involved.

Depending upon the particular aggravating circumstances involved, violations of said law could result in sanctions from a monetary fine to life imprisonment.

Sanctions (Federal, State, and Local Law)

Students and team members should be aware that they are criminal penalties – under federal, state, and local law – that make it illegal to use, manufacture, sell or possess controlled substances. Students must also be aware that there are federal financial aid penalties for drug-related convictions – received prior to and/or while receiving aid – that can affect student eligibility to receive federal financial aid. For additional information regarding federal financial aid and the implications of drug-related convictions, please visit the Office of the US Department of Education's Federal Student Aid website.

Institutional Sanctions for Drug and Alcohol Violations

Students and team members found participating in the use, consumption, sale, purchase, possession, manufacture or distribution of illegal drugs, drug paraphernalia, and/or alcohol while on University property or while engaged in University activities shall be subject to disciplinary sanctions on a case-by-case basis. Students are expected to conduct themselves professionally and refrain from acts of misconduct set forth in the Student Code of Conduct, published in the University Catalog.

Suspected acts of misconduct or violations of this policy should be reported to the appropriate authority for review. Substantiated violations may result in disciplinary sanctions, up to and including expulsion from the University. Employees are expected to observe high standards of ethical, moral, and legal business conduct. Violation of these standards of conduct or this policy may result in corrective action, up to and including termination of employment. Suspected violations should be reported to Human Resources and/or via the UH Hilo Care Team.

Federal Student Financial Aid Penalties for Drug Law Violations

A federal or state drug conviction (but not a local or municipal conviction) can disqualify a student for FSA funds. The student self-certifies (FAFSA question) in applying for aid that he or she is eligible.

Convictions only count against a student for aid eligibility purposes if they were for an offense that occurred during a period of enrollment for which the student was receiving federal student aid—they do not count if the offense was not during such a period, unless the student was denied federal benefits for drug trafficking by a federal or state judge (see drug abuse hold sidebar). Also, a conviction that was reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record does not count, nor does one received when he or she was a juvenile, unless he or she was tried as an adult.

The chart below illustrates the period of ineligibility for FSA funds, depending on whether the conviction was for sale or possession and whether the student had previous offenses. (A conviction for sale of drugs includes convictions for conspiring to sell drugs.)

Offense Possession ofIllegal Drugs Selling Illegal Drugs
1st Offense 1 year from dateof conviction 2 years from dateof conviction
2nd Offense 2 years from dateof conviction Indefinite period
3rd Offense Indefinite period Indefinite period

If the student was convicted of both possessing and selling illegal drugs, and the periods of ineligibility are different, the student will be ineligible for the longer period.

A student regains eligibility the day after the period of ineligibility ends (i.e., for a 1st or 2nd offense); or when he or she successfully completes a qualified drug rehabilitation program that includes passing two unannounced drug tests given by such a program. Further drug convictions will make him ineligible again.

Students denied eligibility for an indefinite period can regain eligibility after completing any of the following 3 options:

  1. Successfully completing a rehabilitation program, as described below, which includes passing two unannounced drug tests from such a program;
  2. Having the conviction reversed, set aside, or removed from the student’s record so that fewer than two convictions for sale or three convictions for possession remain on the record; or
  3. Successfully completing two unannounced drug tests which are part of a rehab program (the student does not need to complete the rest of the program).

In such cases, the nature and dates of the remaining convictions will determine when the student regains eligibility. It is the student’s responsibility to certify to the Financial Aid Office that he or she has successfully completed the rehabilitation program.

Standards for a qualified drug rehabilitation program

A qualified drug rehabilitation program must include at least two unannounced drug tests and satisfy at least one of the following requirements:

  • Be qualified to receive funds directly or indirectly from a federal, state, or local government program.
  • Be qualified to receive payment directly or indirectly from a federally or state-licensed insurance company.
  • Be administered or recognized by a federal, state, or local government agency or court.
  • Be administered or recognized by a federally or state-licensed hospital, health clinic, or medical doctor.

Health Risks Associated with the Use of Drugs and Alcohol

There are serious physical and psychological health implications associated with the use and/or abuse of drugs and alcohol that vary based on the frequency, extent, and intensity of consumption. When consumed in excess, drugs and alcohol can also lead to overdose or death. Drug use can cause changes in the brain that result in memory and cognition problems or lead to more severe consequences such as seizures, stroke, and possible brain damage. Alcohol use can impair brain function and motor skills; excessive use can increase the risk of certain cancers, stroke, and liver disease. Drug and alcohol use while pregnant may result in a number of health complications for the fetus such as premature birth, miscarriage, and low birth weight. For more information on the use of drugs and/or alcohol and its effects on the brain and body, visit the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence.

Description of Health Risks Associated with Drug and Alcohol Use

A drug is a chemical substance that has an effect upon the body or mind. Alcohol is defined as a drug. Drugs and alcohol are capable of impairing judgment and physical capacity and diminishing individual performance in activities of daily living. Problems associated with inappropriate use of drugs and alcohol are complex in nature.

One class of drugs is the sedative-hypnotic which relaxes the central nervous system. These include alcohol, barbiturates, tranquilizers (depressants), marijuana and hashish.

Alcohol is clearly the nation’s most common drug of abuse. With moderate drinking a person may experience flushing, dizziness, dullness of senses and impairment of coordination, reflexes, memory and judgment. Taken in larger quantities, alcohol may produce staggering, slurred speech, double vision, dulling of senses, sudden mood changes, and unconsciousness. When used over a long period of time and in larger amounts, it can cause heart and liver damage, and death from overdose and car accidents.

Synthetic Cannabinoids (synthetic marijuana, also known as K2 or Spice) are a variety of substances which invoke in the user experiences that are similar to that of marijuana but contain no actual marijuana. Instead, these substances are often made of other plant materials to which chemicals have been added to produce psychoactive changes in the brain. The packages may be labeled “natural”, however, they are actually made of synthetic compounds that are sold over the counter in gas stations, head shops and over the internet. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) has designated these substances as Schedule 1 Controlled Substances. Therefore, it is illegal to sell or possess them. However, the manufacturers of these products may evade the law by frequently changing the chemical compounds that they use. The DEA continues to monitor the situation by updating their list of banned substances. There is a misperception among some young people that these drugs are safe, when in fact, they are extremely dangerous. Some of these products are sold as “incense.” These products are abused mainly through inhalation or smoking. Sometimes they may be mixed with marijuana or prepared as a drink. Users report elevated mood, relaxation and altered perception. Negative effects include psychotic episodes with extreme anxiety, paranoia and hallucinations. Other negative symptoms that have been reported to poison control centers include rapid heart rate, vomiting, agitation, confusion and hallucinations. These substances may also raise blood pressure and cause reduced supply of blood to the heart. In a few cases, heart attacks have been reported. With regular use, withdrawal and other addiction symptoms may occur. It has not been fully verified but there is a public health concern that there may be heavy metal residues in these products. The National Institute of Drug Addiction (NIDA) is engaged in further research on synthetic cannabinoids.

Barbiturates and tranquilizers (central nervous system depressants) can cause intoxication and produce such signs as tremors of the hands, lips and tongue, confusion, poor judgment and poor muscular coordination, drowsiness, slurred speech, and constricted pupils.

Marijuana and hashish alter mood and perception and produce anxiety, euphoria, talkative behavior, floating feelings, and hunger. They interfere with memory and intellectual performance and can impair concentration. Long-term, regular marijuana smoking causes irritation of the respiratory tract and can produce lung disease and possible damage to the heart and immune system.

Nicotine acts as a stimulant on the heart and nervous system. When tobacco smoke is inhaled the immediate effects on the body are a faster heartbeat and elevated blood pressure. Young smokers may experience shortness of breath and a nagging cough. Some long-term effects of smoking cigarettes are emphysema, chronic bronchitis, coronary heart disease, and lung cancer.

Caffeine, one of the oldest and most widely used stimulants, is found in coffee, tea, cola, and some cold medications. Dependence on caffeine generally develops in habitual users, with headaches being the most common symptom of withdrawal.

Cocaine, whether it is smoked (crack), injected, or snorted, is risky in all forms. Physical effects include dilated pupils, increased blood pressure, heart rate, breathing and body temperature, and restlessness and anxiety.

Amphetamines increase alertness and activity and are often referred to as speed, uppers, pep pills, and diet pills. Mood swings, irritability, nervousness, and muscle pain are some of the effects of continued use. With use of amphetamines, hallucinations, paranoia, convulsions, brain damage, heart problems, and death occur.

Hallucinogens (psychedelics) include PCP, LSD and mescaline. Hallucinogens temporarily distort reality, cause visual hallucinations, perceptual distortion and psychotic experiences, and sometimes depression and flashbacks.

Opioids are medications that relieve pain (analgesics) by way of reducing the intensity of pain signals reaching the brain. Opioids affect those areas of the brain that control emotion, thus diminishing the effects of a painful stimulus. These analgesic medications include Oxycodone (Percocet), Morphine, and Codeine. They can produce drowsiness, mental confusion, nausea, constipation, and, depending upon the amount taken, then can depress respiration and lead to death. Opioid abusers may attempt to intensify their experience by snorting or ingesting, thus raising their risk for serious medical complications, including overdose.

Long term use may lead to physical dependence and addiction. Withdrawal symptoms of dependence and addiction include musculoskeletal pain, restlessness, diarrhea, vomiting, insomnia, cold flashes, (goose bumps), and involuntary leg movements.

Heroin is an opioid. It is one of the most dangerous drugs in existence. The dangers are physical, psychological, and social. Its use is often fatal as the risk of overdose to the user is very high.

Heroin dependency frequently causes the deterioration of the moral, physical, and intellectual fiber of an individual. Heroin abuse frequently impairs the user’s health, emotional well-being, family life, job performance, and friendships.

UH Hilo is aware of the stresses associated with daily living, and strongly urges that the entire UH ʻohana addresses these stresses by participating in holistic behaviors. It is our goal to assist in this endeavor by creating an environment that promotes and reinforces healthy and responsible living.

This list is not exhaustive. Please use caution when using any over-the-counter or other medication. For further information about the effects of these drugs, please contact Counseling Services.

Health Risks

Several health risks are associated with the use of illegal substances and alcohol. Some of the major risks include:

  • Alcohol - physical and psychological dependence, automobile accidents due to impaired ability and judgment, damage to the development of unborn children, and deterioration of vital organs such as the liver and brain.
  • Amphetamines (Speed, uppers, etc.) - physical and psychological dependence, elevated blood pressure, loss or coordination, stroke, high fever, and heart failure.
  • Cocaine - physical and psychological dependence, sudden cardiac arrest, respiratory failure, severe depression, and paranoia.
  • Hallucinogens (PCP, Angel Dust, LSD, acid, etc.) - physical and psychological dependence decreased muscular coordination, hallucinations, incoherent speech, loss of memory, severe depression or anxiety, and violent episodes.
  • Marijuana - physical and psychological dependence, paranoia, impaired short-term memory and comprehension, damage to the lungs and pulmonary system, and increased risk of lung cancer.
  • Narcotics (heroine, codeine, morphine, etc.) - physical and psychological dependence, nausea, convulsions, coma, premature or addicted infants, and increased risk of hepatitis or AIDS from contaminated syringes

The following is a summary of the various health risks associated with alcohol abuse and use of specific types of drugs. This summary is not intended to be an exhaustive or final statement of all possible consequences to your health of substance abuse, but rather is intended to increase your awareness of the grave risks involved in this kind of behavior.

Alcohol

Alcohol consumption causes several marked changes in behavior. Even low doses significantly impair the judgment and coordination required to drive a car safely. Low to moderate doses of alcohol may increase the incidence of a variety of aggressive acts. Moderate to high doses of alcohol may cause marked impairment in higher mental functions, severely altering a person's ability to learn and remember information. Very high doses may cause respiratory depression or death. If combined with other depressants, dependency may occur. Sudden cessation of alcohol intake is likely to produce withdrawal symptoms, including severe anxiety, tremors, hallucinations, and convulsions. Alcohol withdrawal can be life threatening. Long-term consumption of large quantities of alcohol can lead to permanent damage to vital organs such as the brain and the liver. Females who drink alcohol during pregnancy may give birth to infants with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome. These infants have irreversible physical abnormalities and intellectual disabilities. In addition, research indicates that children of alcoholic parents are more at risk than other youngsters of becoming alcoholics.

Narcotics

Narcotics are drugs that relieve pain, often induce sleep, and refer to opium, opium derivatives, and synthetic substitutes. Opioids and morphine derivatives can cause drowsiness, confusion, nausea, feelings of euphoria, respiratory complications and relieve pain. These include: codeine, fentanyl and fentanyl analogs, heroin, morphine, opium, Oxycodone HCL, and hydrocodone bitartrate, acetaminophen.

Stimulants

These drugs speed up the body's nervous system and create a feeling of energy. They are also called "uppers" because of their ability to make you feel very awake. Stimulants have the opposite effect of depressants. When the effects of a stimulant wear off, the user is typically left with feelings of sickness and a loss of energy. Constant use of such drugs can have very negative effects on the user. In order to prevent extreme negative side effects of these drugs and the impact they have on life, drug treatment centers are often recommended. Stimulants include: cocaine, methamphetamines, amphetamines, Ritalin, and Cylert.

Depressants (Sedatives)

Depressants slow down activity in the central nervous system of your body. These drugs are also called "downers" because they slow the body down and seem to give feelings of relaxation. Depressants are available as prescription drugs to relieve stress and anger, although drowsiness is often a side effect. The "relaxation" felt from these drugs is not a healthy feeling for the body to experience. To stop abuse of this drug, drug treatment is suggested. Depressants include: barbiturates, benzodiazepines, Flunitrazepam, GHB (Gamma-hydroxybutyrate), Methaqualone, alcohol, and tranquillizers.

Hallucinogens

When taking hallucinogens, switching emotions is frequent. These drugs change the mind and cause the appearance of things that are not really there. Hallucinogens affect the body's self-control, such as speech and movement, and often bring about hostility. Other negative side effects of these drugs include heart failure, increased heart rate, higher blood pressure and changes in the body's hormones. Hallucinogens include: LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), Mescaline, and Psilocybin.

Cannabinoids

These drugs result in feelings of euphoria, cause confusion and memory problems, anxiety, a higher heart rate, as well as staggering and poor reaction time. Cannabinoids include hashish and marijuana.

UH Hilo is now a "smoke free campus"

Effective July 10, 2018, Hawaiʻi state law (SB 134, Act 160, SLH 2018) now prohibits the use of tobacco products on all 10 UH campuses and university-owned facilities.

We encourage everyone to refrain from using tobacco products while on any property owned or operated by the University of Hawaiʻi. Tobacco products include, but are not limited to, cigarettes, cigars, pipes, smoking tobacco, electronic cigarettes, vapes and chewing tobacco. The University of Hawaiʻi system implemented a Tobacco Products policy to improve the working and learning environment of the university, and protect faculty, staff, students, and visitors from secondhand smoke exposure while on University of Hawaiʻi campuses. Under this policy, smoking is prohibited in the following areas:

Sexual Assault

Introduction & Guiding Philosophy

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo (UH Hilo) does not condone or tolerate acts of sexual misconduct perpetrated by or against members of its student, staff and faculty community. As an institution of higher education, UH Hilo is committed to ensuring that all students, regardless of their background or identity, have access to a quality learning experience and the opportunity to pursue their academic goals in a safe, supportive learning environment. Further, all forms of sexual misconduct, including rape and sexual assault, interferes with students’ abilities to be active, engaged learners. As such, the University is actively committed to reducing and eradicating the incidence of sexual violence and ameliorating the root causes that lead to sexual violence, as well as providing appropriate support to victims and survivors when an act of sexual violence does occur. This policy is a nondiscrimination policy and applies to all students regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity as well as to third parties. UH Hilo’s Student Sexual Misconduct Policy complies with the complex and interrelated requirements of the federal Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, as amended (“Clery Act”); the Violence Against Women Act, as amended (“VAWA”); Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (“Title IX”); Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended (“Title VII”); Hawaiʻi Revised Statutes (“HRS”) Title 21, Chapter 378; and other applicable laws and state and federal regulations. Please refer to the University of Hawaiʻi System Executive Policy E1.204 “Sexual Assault Policy and Procedural Guidelines.”

Definitions

The scope of “sexual misconduct” covered by this policy includes rape, acquaintance rape, and other sexual acts directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or when the individual is incapable of giving consent because of her/his youth or because of her/his temporary or permanent mental or physical incapacity (including incapacity due to drugs or alcohol). Sexual assault does not require the use of physical force and can be the result of a threat, expressed or implied, that places a person in fear of bodily injury.

Further sexual discrimination and sexual misconduct definitions include:

Consent

Consent in relationship to sexual activity is defined in accordance with its plain and common meaning. With respect to sexual activity, “consent” means words or actions that show a knowing and voluntary agreement to engage in mutually agreed sexual activity (including pictures/video). Mere assent (an affirmative statement or action) does not constitute consent if it is given by a person who is unable to make a reasonable judgment concerning the nature or harmfulness of the activity because of her or his incapacitating intoxication, unconsciousness, youth, language, intellectual or other disability, or other incapacity; or if the assent is the product of threat, coercion, or fraud. Past consent does not imply future consent; silence or an absence of resistance does not imply consent. Consent to engage in sexual activity with one person does not imply consent to engage in sexual activity with another. Consent can be withdrawn at any time. The term “consent” with respect to sexual activity is not specifically defined by Hawaiʻi Revised Statutes.

Dating Violence

VAWA definition of “dating violence” includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of the length of the relationship; the type of relationship; and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. (For the purpose of Clery reporting, dating violence does not include acts covered under the definition of domestic violence.)

Domestic Violence

VAWA defines “domestic violence” as a felony or misdemeanor crime of violence committed by: a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the local jurisdiction. Hawaiʻi law on “domestic abuse” includes persons who have or have had a dating relationship and current and former roommates, children, and persons related by consanguinity.

Indecent Exposure

Under Hawaiʻi law, “indecent exposure” involves a person intentionally exposing their genitals to another person under circumstances in which the conduct is likely to cause affront.

Retaliation

Retaliation is defined as adverse actions taken against a person because of their participation in the following types of protected activities: seeking advice or assistance about a discrimination concern or possible incident of sexual violence; opposing or filing an informal or formal complaint against conduct reasonably believed to constitute discrimination or sexual violence; or testifying, assisting, or participating in an investigation or other proceeding related to a complaint of discrimination or sexual violence. Adverse actions are actions that would dissuade a reasonable person from making or supporting a complaint of discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.

2 42 USC § 13925(a) (10) [40002(a) of VAWA] and 34 CFR Part 668 § 668.46

See Appendix A - HRS § 586-1 and HRS § 707-734.

Sexual Assault

Under Hawaiʻi sexual offense laws, a person commits sexual assault, including but not limited to, when the person knowingly or recklessly subjects another person to an act of nonconsensual sexual penetration or sexual contact. This includes knowingly engaging in the behavior with a person who is unable to give consent due to incapacitation, intellectual disability, and age. Sexual assault also includes statutory rape, indecent exposure, and voyeurism or trespassing on property to engage in surreptitious surveillance for sexual gratification. Sexual assault can be committed by men or women and can occur between persons of the same or different sex.

Hawaiʻi law categorizes sexual offenses as first, second, third, or fourth degree sexual assault, which takes into account factors such as severity, context, age of the victim, capacity for giving consent, and whether the acts involved forcible compulsion, lack of consent, threats of property damage, etc.

For the purpose of this policy “incapacitation” means the person’s decision-making ability is impaired such that the person lacks the ability to make a rational, reasonable decision due to an intellectual or other disability, sleep, involuntary physical restraint, alcohol, drugs, or so-called “date-rape” drugs.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that is strictly prohibited by this policy, as well as by UH Executive Policy EP 1.202 which prohibits discrimination and harassment based on protected categories, including sex, gender identity or expression, and sexual orientation.

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: submission to or rejection of the conduct is either an explicit or implicit term or condition of an individual’s employment, education, or participation in a University program, activity, or service; submission to or rejection of the conduct by an individual is used as a basis in decisions affecting that individual’s employment, education, or participation in a University program, activity, or service; or when such conduct is unwelcome to the person to whom it is directed or to others directly aware of it, and when such conduct is: severe or pervasive; and has the purpose or effect of either: unreasonably interfering with the employee’s work performance or student’s academic performance, or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work or educational environment.

The conduct must be both objectively and subjectively perceived as offensive. That is, the reporting party must view the conduct as offensive, and a reasonable person with the same fundamental characteristics as the reporting party (e.g., age, race, gender) must also view the conduct as offensive.

Sexual Misconduct

For the purpose of this policy, sexual misconduct is a broad term that encompasses sexual harassment, sexual assault, and may include domestic violence, dating violence, indecent exposure and stalking. Sexual misconduct can occur between strangers or acquaintances, including people involved in an intimate or sexual relationship. Sexual misconduct can be committed by men or women, and can occur between people of the same or different sex. Sexual misconduct may be a form of sex discrimination prohibited by federal and state discrimination laws, including Title IX, Title VII, and Chapter 378 of the HRS. In addition, some forms of sexual misconduct violate the criminal laws of the State of Hawaiʻi.

Sexual Violence

The U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR) considers sexual violence to be a form of sex discrimination and a violation of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The term “sexual violence” refers to physical sexual acts perpetrated against a person’s will or where a person is incapable of giving consent (e.g., due to the student’s age or use of drugs or alcohol, or because an intellectual or other disability prevents the student from having the capacity to give consent). A number of different acts fall into the category of sexual violence, including rape, sexual assault, sexual battery, sexual abuse, and sexual coercion. Sexual violence can be carried out by school employees, other students, or third parties. All such acts of sexual violence are forms of sex discrimination prohibited by Title IX.

Stalking

VAWA defines “stalking” as engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others or suffer substantial emotional distress. “Course of conduct” means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, unwelcome acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means (including cyberstalking) follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property. “Reasonable person” means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim. (Note: Hawaiʻi law requires proof of intent; however, this policy includes hostile environment harassment.)

“Substantial emotional distress” means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Applicability

This policy prohibits sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in any University workplace, educational program, activity, or service, which includes all academic, extracurricular, student housing, athletics, and other programs. The policy applies OCR Questions and Answers on Title IX and Sexual Violence, 4/29/2014, VAWA and 34 CFR Part 668 § 668.46, See Appendix A - HRS §711-1106.5 to University community members, volunteers, and visitors to campus. This includes guests, patrons, independent contractors, or clients of the University. This policy applies to sexual misconduct on University premises; at University sponsored activities; that has an adverse impact on the education or employment of a member of the University community; or otherwise threatens the health or safety of a member of the University community.

A student or employee who reports to the University that they believe they have experienced sexual harassment, sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, whether the offense occurred on- or off-campus, shall be offered appropriate assistance and be provided with a written explanation of the student or employee's rights and options under campus procedures.

Prevention Efforts

Through a variety of curricular and co-curricular programs, UH Hilo strives to provide individuals with the information, skills and values necessary to help reduce the risk of sexual violence and prevent it from occurring in the first place. We believe that both men and women should be active partners in dialogue about this issue, and that the responsibility for providing sexual violence prevention education is distributed across all campus constituents and administrative areas. Because of their special and salient relationship with students, faculty members serve a particularly important role in helping to educate students about sexual misconduct. Attention is given to capitalizing on the unique culture of Hawaiʻi to ensure educational efforts and prevention strategies are culturally relevant. Specific initiatives to educate the campus community may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs provides overall coordination for curricular and co-curricular programs targeted to new first-year students such as UNIV 101 (the freshmen seminar) and new student orientation, that address prevention education, campus policies, risk reduction strategies, and available campus resources;
  • Student Health & Wellness Programs implements a mandatory training for new students and a wide array of ongoing primary prevention programming throughout the academic year, addressing rape, sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking, cyber-harassment, and other forms of interpersonal violence, including the student-driven initiative, MEN OF STRENGTH;
  • The residential life program in University Housing provides one-on-one consultations to on- campus residents about personal safety concerns through its peer and professional staff team, as well as sponsors educational programs throughout the academic year about healthy relationships and sexual assault prevention and intervention;
  • The Campus Security Department is available to arrange workshops and seminars throughout the academic year for students, staff and faculty about personal safety and crime prevention;
  • The Women’s Center and the LGBTQ+ Center sponsor events and activities to increase campus awareness about issues related to violence against women, as well as facilitate student, faculty and staff partnerships to promote gender and gender identity equity, and, to ameliorate other root causes of violence and bias.

Intervention Efforts

UH Hilo is committed to ensuring that students who are the victims/survivors of sexual misconduct are treated in a respectful, supportive and caring manner. When sexual misconduct is reported to the University, we are committed to ensuring that:

  • A victim’s/survivor’s safety, privacy and confidentiality is preserved to the greatest extent possible;
  • S/he is able to access advocacy, medical, mental health and other support services both on- and/or off-campus in a timely manner with minimal hardship;
  • Reasonable academic and other accommodations will be instituted to facilitate the victim/survivor’s recovery;
  • Accurate and complete information about all options for recourse, including judicial, civil and criminal, will be communicated to the victim/survivor;
  • A victim/survivor will be empowered with regard to choosing her/his options for recourse; and
  • A victim/survivor’s choices will be honored to the greatest extent possible and will not influence the manner in which the University provides advocacy or support to that individual.

The University takes all allegations of sexual misconduct seriously and is obligated to respond with due diligence and implement actions and consequences accordingly that ensure the safety of our community. Should a victim/survivor wish that the incident not be investigated, the University will work with her/him to honor her/his wishes whenever reasonable and possible. Students who wish to report an allegation of sexual misconduct are strongly encouraged to ask about confidentiality issues and the extent of privacy that will be accorded when they report the incident.

Title IX Coordinator

The Title IX Coordinator’s core responsibilities include overseeing the University’s response to Title IX reports and complaints and identifying and addressing any patterns of systemic problems as a result of such reports and complaints. The coordinator will be informed of all reports and complaints raising Title IX issues, even if the report or complaint was initially filed with another individual or office, or if the investigation will be conducted by another individual or office. The coordinator will have the training, authority, and visibility necessary to fulfill their responsibilities. The University’s Title IX Coordinator reports to the Director of the Office of Equal Opportunity. The coordinator’s core responsibilities also include where appropriate:

  • Providing training on Title IX issues;
  • Investigating formal complaints;
  • Determining appropriate interim measures upon learning of a report or complaint of sexual misconduct; and
  • Ensuring appropriate policies and procedures are in place for working with local law enforcement and coordinating services with local victim advocacy organization and service providers.

The coordinator plays an integral role in carrying out the University’s commitment to provide a positive learning, teaching and working environment for the entire community.

Procedures for Reporting Sexual Misconducts

A student who believes s/he has been the victim/survivor of sexual misconduct is encouraged to contact the Title IX Coordinator. The Coordinator can provide support, information on advocacy and counseling for victims/survivors, assist them with accessing needed support services, and guide them in pursuing options for recourse.

If the student requires immediate medical attention and/or is in life-threatening danger, s/he should call emergency assistance (911) or Campus Security (808) 974-7911 immediately. When a student reports sexual misconduct to Campus Security, the security officer will take information about the incident, refer her/him to medical treatment, complete an Incident Report form, and notify the Title IX Coordinator. Reports received anonymously or from third parties will be reviewed and may be investigated. Anonymous or third party reports for sexual misconduct may be submitted at the University Campus Title IX website and/or the University Campus Security Silent Witness website.

Confidentiality

Efforts to maintain confidentiality will be exercised to the greatest extent possible. However, appropriate members of the University community will be informed that an incident of sexual misconduct has been reported. Certain information may need to be disclosed to appropriate administrators, the accused individual(s), and witnesses in order to conduct an investigation. Information may also be disclosed if required by law, rule, regulation, or by order of the court.

Reporting and Confidentially Disclosing Sexual Violence: Know the Options

The University encourages victims of sexual violence to talk to somebody about what happened – so victims can get the support they need, and so the University can respond appropriately.

Different employees on campus have different abilities to maintain a victim’s confidentiality.

  • Some are required to maintain confidentiality; talking to them is sometimes called a “privileged communication.”
  • Other employees may talk to a victim in confidence, and generally only report to the University that an incident occurred without revealing any personally identifying information. Disclosures to these employees will not trigger a University investigation into an incident against the victim’s wishes.
  • Most employees are required to report all the details of an incident (including the identities of both the victim and alleged perpetrator) to the Title IX coordinator. A report to these employees (called “responsible employees”) constitutes a report to the University – and generally obligates the University to investigate the incident and take appropriate steps to address the situation.

This section is intended to make students aware of the various reporting and confidential disclosure options available to them – so they can make informed choices about where to turn should they become a victim of sexual violence. The University encourages victims to talk to someone identified in one or more of these groups.

The Options

Privileged and Confidential Communications

Professional and Pastoral Counselors - Professional, licensed counselors and pastoral counselors who provide mental-health counseling to members of the school community (and including those who act in that role under the supervision of a licensed counselor) are not required to report any information about an incident to the Title IX coordinator without a victim’s permission.

Following is the contact information for these individuals:

  • All professional mental health counselors in the Student Health & Wellness Program’s Counseling Services at 932-7465 (Student Services Center, 2nd Floor, E203)

Non-professional Counselors and Advocates - Individuals who work or volunteer in the on-campus Student Medical Services, including front desk staff and students, can generally talk to a victim without revealing any personally identifying information about an incident to the University. A victim can seek assistance and support from these individuals without triggering a University investigation that could reveal the victim’s identity or that the victim has disclosed the incident.

Following is contact information for these non-professional counselors and advocates:

  • Staff located at the Student Health & Wellness Program’s Student Medical Services at 932-7369, Campus Center Room 212.

A victim who speaks to a professional or non-professional counselor or advocate must understand that, if the victim wants to maintain confidentiality, the University will be unable to conduct an investigation into the particular incident or pursue disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator. Even so, these counselors and advocates will still assist the victim in receiving other necessary protection and support, such as victim advocacy, academic support or accommodations, disability, health or mental health services, and changes to living, working or course schedules. A victim who at first requests confidentiality may later decide to file a complaint with the school or report the incident to local law enforcement, and thus have the incident fully investigated. These counselors and advocates will provide the victim with assistance if the victim wishes to do so. While these professional and non-professional counselors and advocates may maintain a victim’s confidentiality vis-à-vis the University, they may have reporting or other obligations under state law. [Hawaiʻi State Laws include: Rev. Stat. § 350-1.1, Rev. Stat. § 346-224, §626-1, and §334-60.2, §453D-13 – that pertain to mandatory reporting to law enforcement in case of minors; imminent harm to self or others; requirement to testify if subpoenaed in a criminal case.]

If the University determines that the alleged perpetrator(s) pose a serious and immediate threat to the University community, the Director of Security may be called upon to issue a timely warning to the community. Any such warning should not include any information that identifies the victim.

Reporting to “Responsible Employees”

A “responsible employee” is a University employee who has the authority to redress sexual violence, who has the duty to report incidents of sexual violence or other student misconduct, or who a student could reasonably believe has this authority or duty. When a victim tells a responsible employee about an incident of sexual violence, the victim has the right to expect the University to take immediate and appropriate steps to investigate what happened and to resolve the matter promptly and equitably.

A responsible employee must report to the Title IX coordinator all relevant details about the alleged sexual violence shared by the victim and that the University will need to determine what happened – including the names of the victim and alleged perpetrator(s), any witnesses, and any other relevant facts, including the date, time and specific location of the alleged incident.

To the extent possible, information reported to a responsible employee will be shared only with people responsible for handling the University’s response to the report. A responsible employee should not share information with law enforcement without the victim’s consent or unless the victim has also reported the incident to law enforcement.

The following categories of employees are the University’s responsible employees:

  • Executive and Managerial Staff (E/M) Deans/Associate Deans
  • Director of Security
  • Housing Director/Associate Director/Resident Assistants (RAs)
  • Athletic Director/Assistant Athletic Director, Athletic Trainers, Coaches & Assistant Coaches Women’s Center Staff
  • EEO (Equal Employment Opportunity) / AA (Affirmative Action) Staff

Before a victim reveals any information to a responsible employee, the employee should ensure that the victim understands the employee’s reporting obligations – and, if the victim wants to maintain confidentiality, direct the victim to confidential resources.

If the victim wants to tell the responsible employee what happened but also maintain confidentiality, the employee should tell the victim that the University will consider the request, but cannot guarantee that the University will be able to honor it. In reporting the details of the incident to the Title IX Coordinator, the responsible employee will also inform the Coordinator of the victim’s request for confidentiality.

Responsible employees will not pressure a victim to request confidentiality, but will honor and support the victim’s wishes, including for the University to fully investigate an incident. By the same token, responsible employees will not pressure a victim to make a full report if the victim is not ready to.

Expectations of All UH Hilo Employees

All employees (other than established confidential resources) have the obligation to report incidents of sexual misconduct that impacts UH Hilo students and staff. Employees are expected to promptly contact the UH Hilo Title IX Coordinator or Deputy Coordinator when the employee has knowledge of an incident of sexual misconduct that affects UH Hilo students and staff.

Requesting Confidentiality from the University

If a victim discloses an incident to a responsible employee but wishes to maintain confidentiality or requests that no investigation into a particular incident be conducted or disciplinary action taken, the University must weigh that request against the University’s obligation to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students, including the victim.

If the University honors the request for confidentiality, a victim must understand that the University’s ability to meaningfully investigate the incident and pursue disciplinary action against the alleged perpetrator(s) may be limited.

Although rare, there are times when the University may not be able to honor a victim’s request in order to provide a safe, non-discriminatory environment for all students.

The University has designated the following individual(s) to evaluate requests for confidentiality once a responsible employee is on notice of alleged sexual violence:

Title IX Coordinator and Deputy Title IX Coordinators

When weighing a victim’s request for confidentiality or that no investigation or discipline be pursued, the Title IX Coordinator will consider a range of factors, including the following:

  • The increased risk that the alleged perpetrator will commit additional acts of sexual or other violence, such as:
  • whether there have been other sexual violence complaints about the same alleged perpetrator;
  • whether the alleged perpetrator has a history of arrests or records from a prior school indicating a history of violence;
  • whether the alleged perpetrator threatened further sexual violence or other violence against the victim or others;
  • whether the sexual violence was committed by multiple perpetrators;
  • whether the sexual violence was perpetrated with a weapon;
  • whether the victim is a minor;
  • whether the University possesses other means to obtain relevant evidence of the sexual violence (e.g., security cameras or personnel, physical evidence);
  • whether the victim’s report reveals a pattern of perpetration (e.g., via illicit use of drugs or alcohol) at a given location or by a particular group.

The presence of one or more of these factors could lead the University to investigate and, if appropriate, pursue disciplinary action. If none of these factors is present, the University will likely respect the victim’s request for confidentiality.

If the University determines that it cannot maintain a victim’s confidentiality, the University will inform the victim prior to starting an investigation and will, to the extent possible, only share information with people responsible for handling the University’s response.

The University will remain ever mindful of the victim’s well-being, and will take ongoing steps to protect the victim from retaliation or harm and work with the victim to create a safety plan. Retaliation against the victim, whether by students or University employees, will not be tolerated. The University will also:

  • assist the victim in accessing other available victim advocacy, academic support, counseling, disability, health or mental health services, and legal assistance both on and off campus (see Appendix A);
  • provide other security and support, which could include issuing a no-contact order, helping arrange a change of living or working arrangements or course schedules (including for the alleged perpetrator pending the outcome of an investigation) or adjustments for assignments or tests; and
  • inform the victim of the right to report a crime to campus or local law enforcement – and provide the victim with assistance if the victim wishes to do so.
  • The University may not require a victim to participate in any investigation or disciplinary proceeding. Because the University is under a continuing obligation to address the issue of sexual misconduct campus-wide, reports of sexual misconduct (including non-identifying reports) will also prompt the University to consider broader remedial action – such as increased monitoring, supervision or security at locations where the reported sexual misconduct occurred; increasing education and prevention efforts, including to targeted population groups; conducting climate assessments/victimization surveys; and/or revisiting its policies and practices.

If the University determines that it can respect a victim’s request for confidentiality, the University will also take immediate action as necessary to protect and assist the victim.

Public Awareness

Take Back the Night and other public awareness events - Public awareness events such as “Take Back the Night,” the Clothesline Project, candlelight vigils, protests, “survivor speak outs” or other forums in which students disclose incidents of sexual violence, are not considered notice to the University of sexual violence for purposes of triggering its obligation to investigate any particular incident(s). Such events may, however, inform the need for campus-wide education and prevention efforts, and the University will provide information about students’ Title IX rights at these events.

Anonymous Reporting

Although the University encourages victims to talk to someone, the University provides an online system for anonymous reporting. The system will notify the user (before s/he enters information) that entering personally identifying information may serve as notice to the University for the purpose of triggering an investigation.

Off-campus Counselors and Advocates

Off-campus counselors, advocates, and health care providers will also generally maintain confidentiality and not share information with the University unless the victim requests the disclosure and signs a consent or waiver form. Following is contact information for these off-campus resources (See Appendix A for additional resources):

  • YWCA 24-Hour Sexual Assault Support Services: (808) 935-0677
  • Domestic Abuse Shelter (24 hour): (808) 959-8864

While these off-campus counselors and advocates may maintain a victim’s confidentiality vis-à-vis the University, they may have reporting or other obligations under state law. [Hawaiʻi State Laws include: Rev. Stat. § 350-1.1, Rev. Stat. § 346-224, §626-1, and §334-60.2, §453D-13 – that pertain to mandatory reporting to law enforcement in case of minors; imminent harm to self or others; requirement to testify if subpoenaed in a criminal case.]

Campus Procedures for Referring Victims/Survivors to Appropriate Resources

Sometimes a student may disclose sexual misconduct to another member of the campus community, such as a faculty or staff member or a friend. Disclosing sexual misconduct occurs under varying circumstances. In some situations, it is an immediate crisis, but in other instances, the person may disclose an incident that occurred several months or years ago. If the student requires immediate medical attention and/or is in life-threatening danger, s/he or the person contacted should call emergency assistance at 911 or Campus Security at (808) 974-7911.

However, in almost all instances the appropriate action for a member of the University community to take if a student discloses sexual misconduct is to refer her/him to the Title IX Coordinator. If the victim/survivor discloses the incident to a University employee, s/he should inform the victim/survivor that the employee is obligated to inform the Title IX Coordinator of the report. When an individual discloses a sexual misconduct, the person receiving the information is encouraged to follow the suggestions described in Attachment A, “Suggestions for Supporting a Person Disclosing Sexual Misconduct.”

Campus Procedures for Responding to Victims/Survivors of Sexual Misconduct

When a victim/survivor contacts the Title IX Coordinator, the Coordinator will follow the protocol described below:

  • Refer the student to medical treatment: The Coordinator will urge the student to seek medical treatment for injuries, receive prophylaxis for HIV/sexually transmitted infections, and get testing/education regarding pregnancy risks. The Nurse will inform the victim/survivor that s/he may request the presence of a professional staff member during a medical examination.
  • Refer the student to a forensic medical examination: The Coordinator will inform victims/survivors of sexual assault that they can go to the emergency room at a community medical center for a forensic medical examination in addition to obtaining medical treatment. Forensic examinations are best conducted within 72 hours of a sexual assault for evidence to be valid should criminal proceedings be pursued. To preserve as much evidence as possible, victims/survivors should be advised not to perform any personal hygiene until the examination is complete. The Coordinator can arrange for an advocate from a sexual assault response center such as the YWCA to be present with the student during the examination if s/he wishes. Victims/survivors are strongly encouraged to contact YWCA Sexual Assault Support Services at (808) 935-3215 if they wish to file criminal charges for the assault, or think they might wish to in the future. Sexual Assault Support Services can also assist with making arrangements for a forensic medical examination.
  • Provide and/or refer the student to support services: The Coordinator will arrange for immediate access to support services, which may include both on- and off-campus services. Available support services are listed in Appendix A. Counseling support will be offered to the student. In some situations, others involved in and/or affected by the incident such as roommates and friends may benefit from supportive services such as crisis intervention as well. The Coordinator will refer such individuals to Counseling Services so that their needs may be addressed.
  • Arrange accommodations for the student: The Coordinator may arrange for interim measures to ensure safety and appropriate academic accommodations for the complainant. The measures taken will depend upon the details of each case but may include changing academic, student employment, or campus residence situations, if requested by the complainant and if such accommodations can be reasonably made. While an investigation is pending, no contact orders can be issued.
  • Inform the student about options for recourse: The Coordinator will inform the student about the option and right to notify law enforcement and the option and right to be assisted by campus authorities, if the person so chooses. The Coordinator will also inform the victim/survivor of her/his option to request a restraining order (also referred to as an order of protection or an injunction) against the accused individual and about the process to do so. Restraining orders are issued by the courts, not by the University. If the accused individual is not a UH Hilo student, the victim/survivor may wish to request of the judge that the accused individual not be permitted to be on the UH Hilo campus. If a victim/survivor requests a restraining order, it is the responsibility of the accused individual to request of the judge that any conditions of the order not adversely affect her/his ability to remain in school, in the residence halls, and/or on campus. If a victim/survivor obtains a restraining order against another individual, it is her/his responsibility to notify law enforcement officials if that individual violates the order. In situations in which the complainant is requesting confidentiality such that it limits the institution’s ability to initiate formal proceedings against the respondent and fully investigate the allegations, the university will take steps to limit the impact of the alleged sexual misconduct. These steps may include increased security or monitoring of certain locations, additional education or training for members of the campus community, and additional reminders of the campus’ misconduct assault policy.

Anonymous or Third-Party Complaints

In the case where a report is received from an anonymous source or from an individual who is not the victim/survivor, the university will take steps to limit the impact of alleged sexual misconduct, which may include increased security or monitoring of certain locations and additional reminders of the campus’ sexual misconduct policy.

Campus Procedures for Investigating Sexual Misconduct

The University does not utilize mediation to resolve allegations of sexual misconduct. The university will follow the protocol described below when reports of sexual misconduct are received.

  • A report will be documented in writing and submitted to the Title IX Coordinator or designee. The report may be written by the complainant or by an individual to whom the incident was disclosed, such as a Campus Security or University Housing staff member.
  • The Title IX Coordinator or designee will initiate an investigation following the procedures contained herein. The University commits to conducting a fair, impartial, and thorough investigation and will attempt to investigate all complaints within 60 days. The timeframe of the investigation may vary based on the complexity of the case. In the event an extension is needed both parties will be notified in writing by the Title IX Coordinator or designee.
  • Investigations initiated by the Title IX Coordinator or designee shall be conducted by trained investigators within the university. Investigators shall receive appropriate training on an annual basis.
  • The Title IX Coordinator or designee will notify the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs upon the initiation of an investigation of sexual misconduct allegedly perpetrated against a student of the University. The Vice Chancellor will offer resources for personal support to an accused student, such as referring her/him to a counselor. The role of the support person is not to advocate for the accused student, but rather to provide personal support and assistance to ensure her/his wellbeing as well as offer referrals for assistance. Efforts will be made to avoid any potential conflicts of interest.
  • While an investigation is being conducted, the University may take any action it believes is appropriate against an accused individual in order to preserve the safety and wellbeing of the campus community, including but not limited to temporarily suspending or removing her/him from campus and/or from the residence halls or moving her/him to another residence hall.
  • If the incident occurred off-campus and the accused person(s) is a UH Hilo student, the Title IX Coordinator may initiate an investigation or other appropriate action pursuant to University procedures.
  • The investigator shall interview the complainant, respondent, and any witnesses who may have knowledge of the alleged incident. Both complainant and respondent will have opportunities to provide the names of relevant witnesses and documentary evidence. Evidence or questioning pertaining to the complainant’s prior sexual history with anyone other than the respondent is not allowed. Evidence of a prior consensual relationship between the complainant and respondent is not sufficient justification to confirm sexual misconduct did not occur.
  • If the Title IX Coordinator or designee discovers that the accused individual is not a University of Hawaiʻi student, it may not be possible for the university to investigate. Individuals who are not students may be banned from campus by the Director of Campus Security. If the accused individual is a University of Hawaiʻi student whose home campus is not UH Hilo, the Title IX Coordinator will notify the UH System Office of Institutional Equity. In these cases, it may be the responsibility of the home campus to investigate the incident and carry out its student conduct code procedures; UH Hilo personnel will cooperate fully with officials from other UH campuses in such situations. If the accused individual is a University employee, the Title IX Coordinator or designee will initiate an investigation in accordance with policies applicable to employees.
  • The investigator shall notify all parties questioned in the investigation that their statements have limited confidentiality, and shall be disclosed to the respondent party should the final investigation report determine that the alleged sexual misconduct did occur.
  • Both complainant and respondent have the right to bring an advisor of their choice to all phases of the investigation. The advisor is not permitted to speak or directly participate in any aspect the proceedings but may communicate with their advisee as necessary.
  • Upon the completion of an investigation, the Title IX Coordinator or designee shall send written correspondence to the complainant and respondent to notify the parties of the following:
    1. The investigation has been completed;
    2. A summary of the findings;
    3. That the final investigation report has been submitted to the Dean of Students for adjudication, in the case of a student respondent, or the employee’s supervisor, in the case of an employee respondent.

Campus Procedures for Adjudicating Sexual Misconduct

The Dean of Students will adjudicate proceedings where an investigation report finds that an incident of sexual misconduct has occurred. Sexual misconduct is a violation of the UH System Policy on Sex Discrimination and Gender Based Violence. All proceedings will be in accordance with the procedures herein, which include ensuring that both the complainant and the accused student have their rights to due process upheld.

  • The University uses the preponderance of the evidence standard (i.e. the more likely than not standard) to determine if a policy violation occurred. If, following the hearing, the Dean of Students finds that the existing information fails to support the alleged violation and the findings of the final investigation report; no action will be taken against the respondent. If the Dean of Students determines that it is more likely than not that the respondent violated the Policy, the Dean of Students will render a decision and impose sanctions and remedies as appropriate. Students found responsible for violating this policy will receive sanctions ranging from disciplinary probation to dismissal from the university. The level of sanction will be determined based on the severity of the incident and the respondent’s past conduct history. Both complainant and respondent will simultaneously be notified in writing of the decision of the Dean of Students.
  • Hearing Procedures: In situations in which there is a hearing by the Dean of Students or designee the following guidelines shall apply:
    1. A date and time will be set for the hearing by the adjudicator. Complainant and respondent will be notified in writing at least one week in advance of the hearing.
    2. The adjudicator may accommodate the complainant with special arrangements during the hearing, such as not requiring her/him to be in the same room at the same time with the respondent, if requested by the complainant, if the accommodations can be reasonably made, and if the accommodations do not violate the right to due process of the respondent. Both the complainant and the respondent may have an advisor of their choice (other than an attorney) present at hearings, although the advisor is not permitted to speak or directly participate in the hearing.
    3. All hearings will be closed.
    4. In a complaint involving multiple student respondents, each respondent shall have separate hearings.
    5. Prior to a hearing, complainant and respondent may review documentation that will be presented during the hearing. Personally identifiable information may be redacted.
    6. The complainant and respondent and his/her advisor, if any, will be allowed to attend the hearing, excluding deliberations, at which information is received. Admission of any other person to the hearing will be at the discretion of the adjudicator.
    7. The complainant and respondent have the right to be assisted by an advisor of her/his choice, at his/her own expense. The student is responsible for presenting his/her own information, and therefore, advisors are not permitted to speak or to participate directly in a hearing. A student should select as an advisor a person whose schedule allows attendance at the scheduled date and time for the hearing because delays will not normally be allowed due to the scheduling conflicts of an advisor. An advisor may not be attorney. However, if the same matter is also being investigated through pending criminal proceedings both complainant and respondent may be allowed to have an attorney serve as his/her advisor, at his/her own expense, to behave in the same manner as any other advisor.
    8. Relevant written statements, documents or other information such as photographs, and witnesses may be presented at the hearing by the complainant and respondent and accepted as information for consideration by the adjudicator. The same rules for the types of evidence that may be presented during the investigation also apply for the appeals hearing.
    9. All procedural questions are subject to the final decision of the adjudicator.
    10. Formal rules of process, procedure and/or technical rules of evidence, such as those applied in criminal and civil court will not be used.
    11. There will be a single verbatim record, such as an audio recording, of all hearings (not including deliberations). Deliberations will not be recorded. The record will be the property of UH Hilo and no copies will be made or distributed. All records will be confidential.
    12. If the respondent, without advance notice or explanation, fails to appear at the hearing, the adjudicator will make a decision based on the evidence contained within the Final Investigation Report and supplemental information, if any, provided by the complainant.
    13. Both parties may appeal the decision of the Dean of Students. An appeal must be submitted in writing to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs postmarked within ten (10) school days, or ten (10) business days if school is not in session, of the date of the written decision. The appeal must be based on one or more of the following criteria:
      1. New Information: To consider new information, sufficient to alter a decision or other relevant facts not brought out in the investigation, because such information and/or facts were not known to the student appealing at the time of the investigation.
      2. Procedural Error: To determine whether the investigation conformed to proscribed procedures in light of the complaint and the information presented, and in conformity with proscribed procedures.
      3. Substantive Facts: To determine whether the decision reached was based on information that, if believed by the Dean of Students, was sufficient to establish that a violation of the Student Conduct Code occurred.

The VCSA or designee will review the appeal and determine if it meets the criteria for an appeal to be heard. If it fails to meet one or more of the criteria, the appeal will be denied and the Dean of Student’s decision and sanction(s) will become final. If the VCSA or designee determines the appeal meets one or more of the criteria, the VCSA or designee will review the appeal. While an appeal is being reviewed, an accused student must comply with all sanctions and conditions of the original administrative decision, unless otherwise exempted by the Dean of Students.

The VCSA or designee will review the case and render a final decision in writing and sent via certified mail within twenty (20) working days after receipt of the appeal. Should an extension of time be required for any reason, the parties shall be notified in writing, and a decision shall be made within fifteen (15) working days of the extension. If the VCSA or designee provides either party the opportunity to submit supplemental documents for review, then the other party shall be permitted to submit rebuttal or supplemental documentation.

The standard of review for an appeal is whether the finding is against the clear weight of the evidence in the record of the case.

UH Hilo strongly prohibits retaliation. Retaliation is an adverse action taken against an individual because they have filed a complaint of sexual misconduct, participated in an investigation, or otherwise objected to sexual misconduct. The adverse action should be something that a reasonable person would view as being targeted to discourage the complainant from objecting to sexual misconduct. Incidents of retaliation are considered as separate charges of misconduct. A person found responsible for engaging in retaliation will be subject to disciplinary action.

The University reserves the right not to charge a complainant who reports an incident of sexual misconduct with violating the Student Conduct Code if the incident involves her/his use of alcohol or other drugs or other possible violations of the Code.

Consequences for Students Found Responsible for Sexual Misconduct

Upon completion of an investigation and subsequent proceedings of the student disciplinary process, students who are found responsible for sexual misconduct will be held accountable for their actions. Sanctions may include but are not limited to being placed on warning or probation, loss of certain privileges, providing restitution, and/or being suspended or dismissed from the University. In addition to any sanctions imposed by the Dean of Students, a student may be subject to the following consequences:

  • On-Campus Residents: A student who lives in the residence halls may have her/his housing privileges revoked by the University if found responsible for sexual misconduct. A student who does not reside in University campus residential facility may be banned from visiting the residential areas of the University for a specified period of time if found responsible for sexual misconduct.
  • Student-Athletes: Student-athletes may be terminated from an athletic team and may have her/his athletic scholarship revoked or terminated by the University if found responsible for sexual misconduct.
  • Student Employees: Students who work on-campus, including graduate interns and assistants, may be terminated from their jobs by the University if found responsible for sexual misconduct, particularly if the on-campus place of employment is one in which the victim/survivor may be required to visit.
  • Student Organizations: Chartered student organizations (CSOs) and Registered Independent Student Organizations (RISOs) found to condone, promote, or be involved in activities relating to sexual misconduct may have their University recognition withdrawn and/or other sanctions imposed by the University.
  • Student Leaders/Officers: Students holding positions of leadership and/or service on campus, such as in student government, who are found responsible for sexual misconduct may be terminated from such positions. Students aspiring to such positions are ineligible to hold them if they are not in good disciplinary standing with the University.
  • Special Program Participants: Students who are not in good disciplinary standing or who are accused of a Student Conduct Code violation which is pending may be ineligible for participation in special programs such as National Student Exchange, international exchange programs, and study abroad programs.

The application of the University sexual misconduct policy does not preclude the application of any other relevant University policy, rule, or regulation.

Training

The UH Hilo Title IX Coordinator shall be responsible for coordinating all Title IX and sexual misconduct training on campus. Ongoing training for employees will include practical information about how to prevent and identify sexual violence, including same-sex sexual violence; the behaviors that may lead to and result in sexual violence; the attitudes of bystanders that may allow conduct to continue; the potential for re-victimization by responders and its effect on students; appropriate methods for responding to a student who may have experienced sexual violence, including nonjudgmental language; the impact of trauma on victims; and the person(s) to whom such misconduct must be reported.

UH Hilo will ensure that “responsible employees” with authority to address sexual violence including the Chancellor, Vice Chancellors, Deans, Campus Security staff, Administrators, Athletic staff, and Resident Assistants are trained to respond appropriately to reports of sexual misconduct.

UH Hilo will ensure that all persons involved in responding to, investigating, or adjudicating sexual misconduct including the Title IX Coordinator, Deputy Coordinators, Campus Security, “responsible employees,” victim advocates, and others who receive complaints, will be trained in handling sexual violence complaints, and in the operation of the University’s grievance procedures.

To ensure that students understand their rights under Title IX and to encourage students to report incidences of sexual misconduct, UH Hilo will provide ongoing training for new and continuing students regarding Title IX and sexual violence.

Relationship to Other Policies and Legislation

This policy interfaces with other existing University policies, as well as state statutes and federal regulations, in numerous ways, including but not limited to the following:

  • Jeanne Clery Act: The Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy & Campus Crime Statistics Act is a Federal law, formerly known as the Crime Awareness & Campus Security Act of 1990, requiring colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to maintain and disclose information about crime on and near their campuses. This federal law requires staff in positions designated as Campus Security Authorities (CSAs) report sexual misconduct and other crimes. Examples of positions designated as CSAs include: campus security, dean of students, residence life staff, athletic directors, coaches, student activities staff, and any position with significant responsibility for campus and student activities. Institutions must publish an annual campus security report providing crime statistics, including forcible and non-forcible sex offenses. The information contained in the annual security report does not contain any personally identifiable information but provides statistical data categorizing the type of incident and the location where the incident occurred in accordance with general location categories as defined by the Clery Act. The report must also include policy statements regarding various safety and security measures, campus crime prevention program descriptions, and procedures for responding to allegations of sex offenses. The Clery Act also requires institutions to maintain a public log of all crimes reported to them or those of which they are made aware, as well as to provide timely warnings of crimes that represent a threat to the safety of students or employees.
  • Violence Against Women Act (Reauthorized on 3/7/2013): Initially passed in 1994, VAWA created the first U.S. federal legislation acknowledging domestic violence and sexual assault as crimes, and provided federal resources to encourage community-coordinated responses to combating violence. VAWA 2013 is built upon the overarching goals of the initial 1994 VAWA and its subsequent 2000 and 2005 reauthorizations to provide and improve advocacy, services, and support for all victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking – crimes that primarily impact women, in addition to too many children and some men.
  • Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act: The Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA) is a Federal law that protects the privacy of student education records. In accordance with FERPA, the Dean of Students may disclose the final results, including only the name of the perpetrator, violation of the Student Conduct Code, and sanction, of a UH Hilo disciplinary proceeding to a victim/survivor of a forcible or non-forcible sex offense. This may include the results of a disciplinary proceeding even if the accused student was not found responsible for the violation. The final decision is shared with the victim/survivor only after s/he signs a statement that s/he understands the information is confidential.
  • Campus Sexual Assault Victims' Bill of Rights: The U.S. Congress enacted the "Campus Sexual Assault Victims' Bill of Rights," sometimes referred to as the Ramstad Act, in 1992 (Public Law: 102-325, section 486(c)). This law requires that all colleges and universities (both public and private) participating in federal student aid programs afford sexual assault victims certain basic rights. These rights include the following: The accuser and accused must have the same opportunity to have others present at campus disciplinary proceedings; both parties shall be informed of the outcome of any disciplinary proceeding; victims/survivors shall be informed of their options to notify law enforcement authorities; victims/survivors shall be notified of counseling services; and victims/survivors shall be notified of options for changing academic and living situations if so requested and if such changes are reasonably available.
  • Hawaiʻi Penal Code: Sex offenses, as defined in the Hawaiʻi Penal Code, Part V, Sections (707) 730-733, may be subject to criminal prosecution.
  • Nondiscrimination, Anti-Harassment, and Affirmative Action Policy: UH Executive Policy E1.202Nondiscrimination, Anti-Harassment, and Affirmative Action Policy is the system wide policy prohibiting discrimination in University education, employment, programs, activities, and services. It covers equal opportunity, reasonable accommodations, definition of “discriminatory harassment,” and federal contractor obligations to maintain good faith efforts to recruit job applicants who are qualified veterans, individuals with disabilities, and members of underrepresented groups (women, minorities). The term discriminatory harassment includes sexual harassment and other gender based offenses such as sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.
  • University of Hawaiʻi System Sexual Assault Policy: The University of Hawaiʻi Executive Policy E1.204, “Sexual Assault Policy and Procedural Guidelines,” is the System-wide policy prohibiting sexual discrimination and misconduct within the University. The policy authorizes Chancellors or their designees to implement procedures for their respective campuses for responding to reports of sexual discrimination and misconduct, and to use the executive policy and procedure as a guide to develop a similar protocol tailored to the organizational structure of their respective campus. This UH Hilo sexual misconduct policy is intended to supplement and comply with the scope and procedural guidelines of the University of Hawaiʻi System policy.
  • University of Hawaiʻi System Workplace Nonviolence Policy: The University of Hawaiʻi Executive Policy E9.210 on workplace nonviolence prohibits violence in the workplace. The policy affirms the University’s commitment to maintaining a safe and secure environment for students, employees (including administrators, faculty and staff), visitors, and other members of the University community. Victims of sexual assault who wish to file a complaint with the University have the option of using campus procedures for sexual assault or procedures for workplace nonviolence.
  • Student Conduct Code: UH Executive Policy E7.208University of Hawaiʻi System wide Student Conduct Code affirms the rules and regulations that students are expected to comply with. The policy also prohibits conduct that conflicts with the University’s values and community standards. Prohibited conduct includes sexual harassment, discrimination, physical and verbal abuse, assault, and surreptitiously taking photos, audio or video recordings when such acts are likely to cause injury or distress.
  • Policy on the Use of Information Technology Resources: UH Executive Policy E2.210Executive Policy on the Use and Management of Information Technology is the system wide policy outlining the appropriate use of information technology resources by University faculty, staff, and students. The policy provides guidance for IT users on complying with University policies regarding sexual harassment, email harassment, and community standards regarding privacy. The policy also references Hawaiʻi law prohibiting the use of computers to commit sexual assault and child abuse.

Campus and Public Announcements

As a University, we recognize that we have an ethical and fiduciary responsibility to act and respond in ways that minimize risk to our campus community and actively promote a living-learning environment free from fear and coercion. There are times when incidents of violence occur on or near campus that have the potential to affect the wellbeing of students, staff and faculty. The University will provide timely relevant information through appropriate, reasonable mediums (e.g., alerts sent by email and/or on the University website) to ensure that members of the campus community have access to information that can enable them to make informed choices about their personal safety. In consultation with the Director of Campus Security, the VCSA will determine whether a report of sexual misconduct represents a threat to the safety of members of the campus community. If so, the VCSA, Director of Campus Security, or the University Relations office will make the announcement to the campus community in a timely manner. To protect her/his privacy, the name of the victim/survivor will not be made public in any such public communication. When possible, the victim/survivor will be advised regarding the issuance of announcements. University employees contacted in response to such an announcement should refer inquiries to the University Relations office.

Records of Sexual Misconduct

In compliance with the Clery Act, the University is required to provide annual statistics on sexual misconduct incidents that occur on or near campus. These statistics are public information; however, victims/survivors will not be identified by name. To facilitate the annual reporting of these statistics, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs will maintain confidential records of all reports of sexual misconduct on or near campus.

Suggestions for supporting a person disclosing sexual misconduct

For Faculty, Staff and Friends

The first response is to provide support and basic crisis intervention to the individual. However, victims/survivors of sexual misconduct may take days, weeks or even years before they can talk about what has happened to them. Talking about sexual violence will often bring up topics difficult to handle. Remember that if someone has chosen you to talk with about sexual misconduct, it is because they trust you. Acknowledge that trust by being supportive and non-judgmental.

In most instances, the most appropriate action for you to take is to encourage and assist the victim/survivor to seek assistance at the UH Hilo Counseling Center. A counselor will coordinate services on campus to support the student. It is not your job to serve as a counselor to the victim but the way you respond, offer support, and refer her/him for assistance can make a significant impact on her/his recovery.

Use sensitive and supportive communication with the victim/survivor of sexual misconduct. Such communication is:

  • Supportive: gives victims the sense that they can trust you;
  • Nonjudgmental: conveys the message that the perpetrator, not the victim, is responsible for the assault;
  • Empathetic: shows sensitivity to the trauma the victim is experiencing;
  • Non-directive: encourages the victim to make her/his choices, without pressure;
  • Provides information: gives the victim information about options available to her/him;
  • Encourages self-directed decision-making: allows the victim to regain a sense of control through making her/his own choices.

Examples of ways to talk with victims/survivors when they disclose that they have been sexually assaulted include:

  • “Thank you for telling me this, I realize how hard this is.” (Conveys support and empathy)
  • “May I ask you some questions, so that we can figure out what to do next?” (Shows respect and is non-directive)
  • “Sometimes when this happens, victims blame themselves—this is not your fault.” (Shows non- judgment)
  • “There are different options for help, would you like to talk about these?” (Gives information and encourages the person’s decision-making)
  • “Staff at the Counseling Center is available to help. They are especially trained to work with students who have been assaulted and can offer you help with whatever you choose to do or not to do. May I help you make the call?” (Gives information and helps the victim/survivor link with services)

Resources for Victims/Survivors of Sexual Misconduct

Emergency Response

  • Police/Fire/Ambulance: 911
  • Campus Security: (808) 974-7911

Campus Services and Support

Student Medical Services, (808) 932-7369, Campus Center Room 212

Medical Services provides follow-up treatment and care, including referral for a forensic medical examination at the Hilo Medical Center. The student can also be evaluated at Student Health Services for emergency contraception and testing for some sexually transmitted infections. For tests not conducted at Student Health Services, the Nurse will assist with arrangements for testing at an outside laboratory.

Counseling Services

(808) 932-7465, New Student Services Center, 2nd floor, Room E203

The Counseling Center offers continuing supportive individual counseling including support for traumatic events such as sexual misconduct as well as referrals to other mental health services. When you contact the Counseling Center, you may request to work with a female or male counselor.

Women’s Center

(808) 932-7381, New Student Services Center, 2nd floor, Room E223/E224

The Women’s Center can assist a student who reports sexual misconduct with initial consultation and information about available on- and off-campus services. The staff works to support a student who has been victimized at her/his request, through the reporting and investigation process.

University Housing

(808) 932-7406, PB 11 Room 5

University Housing staff members are trained to assist students who are residents with resources and referrals. Staff members will assist with connecting students to vital care and support services.

Dean of Students Office

(808) 932-7472 or (808) 932-7470, Student Services Building Room W301

Students who have been assaulted by a UH Hilo student may report the incident to the Dean of Students office, which will investigate the matter and hold students who are found responsible accountable for their actions.

Off-Campus Services and Support

24-Hour Sexual Assault Crisis Line: (808) 935-0677

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) supports victims/survivors of sexual assault and their significant others immediately after an assault via a 24-hour telephone line. Victims/survivors who appear at the Hilo Medical Center or Kona Hospital or report an assault to the police will receive in-person contact with an SASS staff member for support and advocacy 24 hours a day.

Victim/Witness Assistance Program Office of the Prosecuting Attorney

655 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo, HI 96720: (808) 934-3306

Assists individuals by explaining procedures and provides orientation and support to victims/survivors and witnesses through the criminal justice system. Provides information on cases, promotes public awareness of victim/witness concerns, and provides referrals to service agencies providing further assistance to victims/survivors.

Temporary Restraining Orders (TROs)

Family Court: 777 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 961-7500
District Court: 777 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 961-7470

Responsible for administering restraining orders, both temporary and long-term ones. For cases involving family members, relations or roommates, restraining order are handled by Family Court; all other cases are handled by District Court. Turning Point for Families (see below) provides assistance with preparing requests for restraining orders administered through Family Court.

Child & Family Services, Alternatives to Violence

1045A Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 969-7798

Peer counseling, education groups and legal help for women and children. Advocacy and help for battered women including services such as preparing and filing requests for restraining orders. Therapeutic groups for children under 12. Court-mandated groups for men/women who batter.

Domestic Abuse Shelter

c/o Child & Family Services, 1045A Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 959-8864

24-hour spouse abuse shelter for women and their children who are victims of spouse abuse within their household. Clients may stay up to 60 days and some transportation is provided.

National Sexual Assault Hotline

(800) 656-4673 (toll free)

24-hour access to information, resources and research regarding sexual assault.

What to do if you are Sexually Assaulted

  • Know that no victim or survivor is ever at fault for their own sexual assault, regardless of their behavior, actions or whereabouts. Every person deserves to live in a safe environment free of violence.
  • If you have been sexually assaulted, the most important thing is to take care of your safety and well-being. Get to a place away from the perpetrator and seek family or friends if possible.
  • When reporting a sexual assault, document as many details as possible, as soon as possible. Accurate recall of events will fade quickly. Documentation in sufficient detail soon after an incident can serve as more reliable evidence in legal proceedings should they follow. Specifically:
    • Note the location and time of any events. Describe the number and characteristics of the assailant or assailants. Write down as much detail as possible about the circumstances surrounding the assault as possible. Note if you may have inflicted any injuries on the assailant, e.g., scratched the assailant’s face with your nails. A greater level of detail increases the likelihood that the suspect will be apprehended and successfully prosecuted.
  • Maintain as much evidence as possible in its intact state. Do not wipe away or throw away any bodily fluids, secretions or tissue that can be identified. Refrain from brushing your teeth, drinking beverages, removing/changing clothing, or removing/changing bedding, furniture or any fabric/upholstery.
  • Resist the urge to clean up by washing, showering or douching. You may receive a forensic examination to collect sexual assault evidence by a trained health professional at a medical care facility. The specimens that will be collected are very important in establishing the guilt and identity of the assailant. Many of these specimens contain DNA evidence that can provide conclusive proof of the identity of the assailant.
  • Before going to a hospital to receive a forensic examination, it is a good idea to bring an extra change of underwear, clothing and shoes, as these items will likely be kept by the hospital as part of the evidence collection process to be turned over to law enforcement.
  • As soon as possible after a sexual assault, be sure to use available counseling or mental health services, including contacting the 24-hour crisis hotline. The sooner that you seek emotional and psychological support, the sooner you can begin the road to recovery. Sexual assault is a very traumatic experience, but many victims/survivors can find ways to go on with their lives and turn the experience into a source of strength and wisdom. Talking to others about what happened as soon as possible is critical to the healing process.

What Men and Boys can do to Prevent Rape

Because most perpetrators of sexual assault and rape are male, boys and men have a special role and responsibility to prevent this form of violence.

It isn’t enough to be “against rape.” Research shows that most heterosexual men would never rape a woman and believe that rape is wrong. Yet, most college men who commit rape fail to recognize their acts as such, even when the victim presses charges. Closely and critically examine the way you treat and feel about women: might you ever be placing yourself in potentially compromising situations? Do you categorize some women as “loose” or “slutty” and therefore presume they are sexually available? Ask yourself honestly: do you believe in any rape myths or some variation of them? If so, work on changing.

Take an active stand against sexism. Avoid making sexist jokes or laughing when others tell them. Whether you actively participate in the degradation of women or simply passively listen, you are communicating that you believe women are not as deserving of respect or equal treatment as men are. Jokes, comments, pornography and other forms of media which objectify or sexualize women foster a “rape culture” which justifies and normalizes rape. Remember, too, that every woman is somebody’s sister, daughter, mother, girlfriend, etc. Men often expect and demand that the women who are close to them be treated appropriately but some men may fail to afford the same treatment to other women. Treat all women as you would want the women you care about to be treated.

Never assume. Ask straightforward, tactful questions about your partner’s sexual boundaries and desires. If you believe you’re mature enough to have sex, then you should be comfortable with open, honest communication — even if it means you might get rejected. Refrain from coercive, pressuring techniques. Realize that prevailing gender role norms may inhibit women from being assertive when expressing their sexuality, so when a woman is comfortable enough to be responsible for her own sexuality, she needs to be appreciated for that, not judged. If you are unable to get a clear response from your partner or sex is being used to manipulate you, it’s best to get yourself out of the situation.

Establish clear verbal consent from a sober partner. Research shows that men and women interpret non-verbal signals, dress, and behavior in different ways. Men, in general, more readily interpret behavior such as touching, laughing or consumption of alcohol or other drugs as signs of sexual interest when women are in fact only being friendly or flirtatious; similarly, going up to a man’s room, wearing revealing clothing, or dancing in a suggestive manner are often misinterpreted. Unless a woman has given you a verbal, audible and sober “yes,” you don’t have clear consent for sexual intercourse.

Manage alcohol and other drug use. The vast majority of campus rapes involve alcohol or other drug use on the part of the perpetrator and/or victim. Research studies demonstrate that alcohol increases male sexual aggression by exacerbating the effects of testosterone. Men should especially be aware that when they are intoxicated, they may not listen as well or be aware of their own strength. Regardless of your state of intoxication, you are accountable for your actions.

Hold your male friends accountable. How men are raised in US society can affect the way men think and talk about sexual relationships or women. You may feel a lot of pressure to prove your masculinity. The best role models of masculinity are those who aren’t afraid to stand up for or do the right thing. Stop a friend who is getting too sexually aggressive. If you care about your male friends, don’t let them go home with potential sexual partners who are intoxicated or high, sexually harass women at a house party or in a bar, or otherwise place themselves in potentially risky situations. Men have a lot to lose if they’re accused or convicted of rape.

Take a public stand against sexual assault. Write letters to the editor of the college newspaper. Participate in anti-violence marches and rallies. Not enough men’s voices are heard in the public arena in support of a non-violent community. All men are ethically and morally responsible for influencing the behavior of the few men who do commit violence against women. Ultimately, men have the greatest potential to impact other men and prevent sexual assault (Katz, 1995).

Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

Emergency Response

In the event of an emergency on any campus, UH Hilo personnel (mainly safety and/or security personnel) will respond and generally are first on scene. The Incident Command System (ICS) is utilized when responding to an emergency. The ICS provides standard procedures for the confirmation of and response to an emergency.

Depending on the nature of the emergency, members of the Crisis Management Team will be notified and will report to the Emergency Operations Center. The UH Hilo Administration Intake Team will keep the UH Hilo Crisis Management Team apprised of the situation. UH Hilo will request assistance from outside law enforcement agencies or other response organizations and will coordinate response efforts.

Immediate Notification

Upon confirmation of a significant emergency or dangerous situation involving an immediate threat to the health or safety of students or employees occurring on campus, UH Hilo will, without delay and taking into account the safety of the community, determine the content of the notification and initiate the notification system for all or a segment of the campus, unless issuing a notification will, in the judgment of responsible authorities, compromise efforts to assist a victim or to contain, respond to or otherwise mitigate the emergency.

Responsible authorities, who can confirm a significant emergency or dangerous situation and draft and issue an immediate notification, include:

  • Chancellor
  • Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs
  • Director of Campus Security
  • Environmental Health & Safety Officer
  • Campus Designees
  • Director of Auxiliary Services

Depending on the nature of the emergency, one or more notification systems may be utilized. These systems include, but are not limited to:

  • Text messages
  • UH email system
  • Local media
  • Social Media
  • Building fire alarms
  • Emergency Announcement Systems

UH maintains an opt-in emergency notification system – UH Alert – that may be used for immediate notifications via email and text messages. Pre-scripted messages have been developed and will be used – with appropriate modifications – during emergency situations.

All immediate notifications will have at least one follow-up message (i.e., the “All Clear” message). Generally, the follow-up messages will be issued utilizing the same notification systems as the initial notification. However, word-of-mouth, the UH Hilo website or other means may be utilized when appropriate.

The public information officer or designee may communicate with local media such as newspapers, television stations and radio stations to disseminate emergency information to the surrounding community. The public information officer will provide a statement for posting additional information on the UH Hilo website, which is another possible source for the larger community to obtain such information.

Campus Evacuation Procedures

The UH Hilo chancellor or designee will authorize campus evacuation orders. Once an evacuation order has been given, students and employees should follow the instructions and timelines for leaving the campus and should alert others to do the same. Information about returning to campus will be communicated through the UH Hilo webpage.

Building Evacuation Procedures

An evacuation will occur when the fire alarm sounds and/or notification is given by appropriate personnel. All persons (students, employees and visitors) are to immediately vacate the building in as safe a manner as possible. All persons should follow orders given by UH Hilo officers at the scene. Personnel shall not return to an evacuated building until instructed by UH Hilo security or other appropriate officials. Evacuation drills are conducted periodically for on campus buildings. The building evacuation is documented and reviewed by the Office of Environmental Health and Safety.

UH Hilo Crisis Management Team Members

  • Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
  • Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs
  • Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
  • Director of Campus Security
  • Environmental Health & Safety Officer
  • Director of University Relations
  • Human Resources Office
  • Director of Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action

Testing Emergency Response and Evacuation Procedures

UH Hilo tests its emergency response and evacuation procedures as defined in the Clery Act on an annual basis. UH Hilo conducts a drill, an exercise and publicizes its emergency response and evacuation procedures via campus email annually. A description of the drill is documented and an after-action report is completed and kept by the Emergency Management/Business Continuity Coordinator.

Fire Safety Report

UH Hilo Fire Safety Report is now published with the Annual Security and Fire Safety Report and is available at the Security Office 24 hours a day or online.

Missing Students

The UH Hilo takes student safety seriously. The following policy and procedures have been established to assist in locating missing UH Hilo students who reside in on‐campus housing. The purpose of this policy and procedures is to promote the safety and welfare of UH Hilo students in accordance with the requirements of the Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008.

Procedures for Reporting a Missing Student

If an individual has reason to believe that a student who legally resides in on‐campus housing is missing, he/she should immediately notify Campus Security, (808) 974‐7911, the Dean of Students (808) 932-7472, or the University Housing Office (808) 974‐7522. This team will work together to share information under the leadership and coordination of the Director of Campus Security.

For students who do not reside on-campus and are reported missing, the University may provide reasonable response and assistance as resources and time allow.

Investigating a Report of a Missing Student

Upon receiving information that a student cannot be located and may be missing, the Director of Campus Security in collaboration with University Housing personnel and the Dean of Students will initiate an investigation. Before presuming that the student is missing, reasonable measures will be taken to determine whether or not anyone familiar with the student has seen or heard from him/her recently or is aware of where he/she may be. Investigating a missing student report includes, but is not limited to, the following:

  • Obtain information from the reporting individual about the student, such as a physical description, including clothes he/she may have been wearing when last seen; who he/she may be with or where he/she may be; his/her physical and mental well-being; and the reasons he/she believes the student is missing. (Campus Security Director)
  • Attempt to contact the student via his/her cell phone (if available) and/or email address. (Dean of Students)
  • Check the student’s room to see if he/she is present. (University Housing personnel)
  • Contact University Housing Community Coordinators, roommates, friends, employers, and members of clubs and organizations the student may be affiliated with, if known, to obtain information about when and where the student was last seen and if the student’s absence is inconsistent with his/her established patterns of behavior. (University Housing personnel)
  • Contact the student’s professors to ascertain the student’s recent attendance in class. (Dean of Students)
  • Obtain a photograph of the student, if available, from student ID card records and use this information (and/or the physical description) to conduct a search, with the possible assistance from University Housing personnel or others, of campus and buildings where the student has classes. The Campus Security Director may issue an ID card photograph to personnel involved to assist in the identification of the missing student. (Campus Security Director)
  • Contact the Parking Office to determine if the student has a vehicle registered on campus; if the student has a vehicle, Campus Security officers will attempt to locate the vehicle on campus. (Campus Security officers)

Notifying Appropriate Persons of a Report of a Missing Student

If the student cannot be located after reasonable efforts, the following individuals will be notified no later than 24 hours after the student has been determined to be missing:

  • The Dean of Students will contact the Confidential Contact identified by the student (see below).
  • If the missing student is under the age of 18 and is not an emancipated individual, the Dean of Students will notify the student’s custodial parent or legal guardian.
  • The Director of Campus Security will notify the local law enforcement agency.
  • The Dean of Students will notify the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.

This policy does not preclude the University from implementing the procedures described above in less than 24 hours if circumstances warrant a faster implementation.

Confidential Contact

Students residing in on‐campus housing have the option to confidentially identify an individual to be contacted by UH Hilo in the event he/she is determined to be missing for more than 24 hours. Students will be provided the option of designating a confidential contact at the time he/she checks in to a residence hall. Students will be informed at that time that:

  • if they identify such an individual, UH Hilo will notify that person no later than 24 hours after they have been determined to be missing
  • if they are under age 18 and are not an emancipated individual at the time they are determined to be missing, UH Hilo will notify the student’s custodial parent or legal guardian
  • even if they do not provide a contact person, the University will notify local law enforcement that they have been determined to be missing
  • The confidential contact information will be accessible only by authorized campus officials and law enforcement officers in furtherance of a missing person investigation.

Student Notification of this Policy

In addition to informing resident students of this policy at the time they check in to a residence hall, the University will notify students of this policy and procedures through the following methods:

  • Posting it on the UH Hilo, University Housing, Campus Security, and Student Rights and Responsibilities websites
  • Discussing it with resident students by University Housing personnel at the beginning of the academic year in residence hall meetings

External Communications

In cases of a missing student, local law enforcement agency may provide information to the media that is designed to obtain public assistance in the search for a missing student. In doing so, the local law enforcement agency will consult with UH Hilo University Relations. Any media requests to the University will be directed to the University Relations office.

Contact Information

Emergency Response

Police/Fire/Ambulance: 911
Campus Security: (808) 974-7911

Campus Services and Support

Student Medical Services

(808) 932-7369, Campus Center Room 212

Medical Services provides follow-up treatment and care, including referral for a forensic medical examination at the Hilo Medical Center. The student can also be evaluated at Student Health Services for emergency contraception and testing for some sexually transmitted infections. For tests not conducted at Student Health Services, the Nurse will assist with arrangements for testing at an outside laboratory.

Counseling Services

(808) 932-7465, New Student Services Center, 2nd floor, Room E203

The Counseling Center offers continuing supportive individual counseling including support for traumatic events such as sexual assault as well as referrals to other mental health services. When you contact the Counseling Center, you may request to work with a female or male counselor.

Women’s Center

(808) 932-7381, New Student Services Center, 2nd floor, Room E223/E224

The Women’s Center can assist a student who reports a sexual assault with initial consultation and information about available on- and off-campus services. The staff works to support a student who has been victimized at her/his request, through the reporting and investigation process.

University Housing

(808) 932-7406, PB 11 Room 5

University Housing staff members are trained to assist students who are residents with resources and referrals. Staff members will assist with connecting students to vital care and support services.

Dean of Students Office

(808) 932-7472 or (808) 932-7470, Student Services Building Room W301

Students who have been assaulted by a UH Hilo student may report the incident to the Dean of Students office, which will investigate the matter and hold students who are found responsible accountable for their actions.

Off-Campus Services and Support

Hawaiʻi Police Department

349 Kapi‘olani Street, Hilo, HI 96720

  • Emergency: 911 (TDD accessible) / Non-emergency (808) 935-3311
  • Crime Stoppers: Hilo (808) 961-8300 / Kona (808) 329-8181
  • Vice/Drug Tip Hotline: Hilo (808) 934-8423 / Kona (808) 329-0423
  • Information about arrested adults: (808) 961-2213
  • Reports/Police Records: East Hawaiʻi (808) 961-2233 / West Hawaiʻi (808) 326-4646, ext. 256
  • Community Policing: East Hawaiʻi (808) 961-2350 / West Hawaiʻi (808) 326-4646, ext. 259
  • Email: copsysop@co.hawaii.hi.us
  • Website: www.hawaiipolice.com

24-Hour Sexual Assault Crisis Line

(808) 935-0677

Sexual Assault Support Services (SASS) supports victims/survivors of sexual assault and their significant others immediately after an assault via a 24-hour telephone line. Victims/survivors who appear at the Hilo Medical Center or Kona Hospital or report an assault to the police will receive in-person contact with an SASS staff member for support and advocacy 24 hours a day.

Victim/Witness Assistance Programs

Office of the Prosecuting Attorney

655 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 934-3306

Assists individuals by explaining procedures and provides orientation and support to victims/survivors and witnesses through the criminal justice system. Provides information on cases, promotes public awareness of victim/witness concerns, and provides referrals to service agencies providing further assistance to victims/survivors.

Temporary Restraining Orders

(TROs) Family Court: 777 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 961-7500
District Court: 777 Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 961-7470

Responsible for administering restraining orders, both temporary and long-term ones. For cases involving family members, relations or roommates, restraining order are handled by Family Court; all other cases are handled by District Court. Turning Point for Families (see below) provides assistance with preparing requests for restraining orders administered through Family Court.

Child & Family Services

Alternatives to Violence

1045A Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 969-7798

Peer counseling, education groups and legal help for women and children. Advocacy and help for battered women including services such as preparing and filing requests for restraining orders. Therapeutic groups for children under 12. Court-mandated groups for men/women who batter.

Domestic Abuse Shelter

Child & Family Services, 1045A Kilauea Avenue, Hilo: (808) 959-8864

24-hour spouse abuse shelter for women and their children who are victims of spouse abuse within their household. Clients may stay up to 60 days and some transportation is provided.

National Sexual Assault Hotline

(800) 656-4673 (toll free)

24-hour access to information, resources and research regarding sexual assault.

Other University Policies

Anti-Discrimination Policy

Board of Regents Bylaws, Section 1-5 (April 21, 2011)

It is the policy of the University to provide equity of opportunity in higher education, both in the educational mission and as an employer. The University is committed to comply with all State and Federal statutes, rules, and regulations which prohibit discrimination. The University is committed to a policy of nondiscrimination on the basis of race, sex, gender identity and expression, age, religion, color, national origin, ancestry, citizenship, disability, genetic information, marital status, breastfeeding, income assignment for child support, arrest and court record (except as permissible under State law), sexual orientation, national guard absence, or status as a covered veteran.

This policy covers admission and access to, and participation, treatment and employment in the University’s programs and activities. Discriminatory harassment, including sexual harassment, is prohibited under this policy. The University shall promote a full realization of equal opportunity through a positive, continuing program of nondiscrimination and affirmative action (41 CFR Chapter 60) on each campus.

Executive Policy EP1.202 on Nondiscrimination and Affirmative Action.

Disability Access

Contact the EEO/AA Office at eeo@hawaii.edu or your campus EEO/AA Coordinator for information on the reasonable accommodation process for applicants and employees with disabilities.

Please contact us if you would like to read the State of Hawaiʻi Accommodations for Employees with Disabilities Manual, which outlines the recommended procedures and provides accommodation request forms and medical waivers.

Program Access

Are you teaching a class? Sponsoring a public event? Organizing a workshop? Leading a field trip? Responsible for a sports event?

All university programs and activities should be accessible to persons with disabilities. Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act states: “A public entity shall furnish appropriate auxiliary aids and services where necessary to afford an individual with a disability an equal opportunity to participate in, and enjoy the benefits of, a service, program, or activity conducted by a public entity.”

You can also download the State of Hawaiʻi Programs and Services Manual For Persons with Disabilities. The manual covers customer service, auxiliary aids, sign language interpreters, facility access, service animals, registration forms, catering and banquet facilities, audio/visual presentations, safety and other elements of an accessible program.

Web access

All university programs have an obligation to ensure effective communication with persons with disabilities. This includes print media, audio media and electronic media such as the internet.

Consensual Relationships

The University of Hawaiʻi is committed to ensuring a safe, civil, working environment in which the dignity of every individual is recognized and respected. All members of the University share equal responsibility in this regard. All relationships between University employees and its students adhere to principles of professionalism, integrity, mutual trust, and respect.

The new Policy on Consensual Relationships takes a best-practice approach in recognizing and managing consensual relationships, while also balancing the privacy interests of individuals and supporting the values, mission and goals of our university.

In particular, this policy will help our campuses remain free from real or perceived conflicts when individuals in positions of unequal power are involved in consensual romantic, dating or sexual relationships. Power is unequal when one individual in a relationship has direct supervision, direction, instruction, oversight, evaluation, advisement or substantial influence over the employment or educational status of another.

Procedures

For guidelines on affirmative action recruitment and EEO in the hiring process, see AP9.540 Recruitment and Selection Procedures for APT and Faculty.

Search Committees

Are you serving on a search committee?

You are strongly advised to have your campus EEO/AA Coordinator provide a search committee briefing on affirmative action goals and recruitment, unlawful and lawful inquiries, confidentiality, preventing conflicts of interest and conducting background and reference checks.

Workplace Non-violence Policy

Executive Policy 9.210.

  1. The University of Hawaiʻi prohibits any work related or workplace violence against its students, faculty, staff, visitors and contract employees which materially and substantially interferes with an individual’s work, academic performance, and/or workplace safety and/or otherwise subjectively and objectively creates a hostile environment. Such prohibited violent acts may involve physical attack, property damage, as well as written or verbal statements or non-verbal gestures that, to a reasonable person, express or suggest the intent to cause physical or mental harm to another person including but not limited to:
    1. hitting;
    2. pushing and shoving;
    3. throwing or breaking objects;
    4. shouting or yelling in a threatening or hostile manner;
    5. threatening gestures or remarks;
    6. disruptive or hostile actions;
    7. abusive or belligerent language;
    8. sabotage of equipment;
    9. making or sending harassing or threatening telephone calls, letters or other forms of written or electronic communications;
    10. stalking, etc.
  2. All incidents must be reported and will be addressed immediately according to statutes, rules, collective bargaining agreements, or policies. Employees (i.e. faculty and staff) should report all incidents to their supervisors or campus designee. The decision to report an incident will never be questioned. The supervisor is responsible for addressing the complaint immediately in accordance with statutes or University policies.

UH Hilo Title IX Training Programs

Date of Training Title of Training Content Area Numberof Attendees
3/1/17 Title IX Student Employee Training 12
3/7/17 Title IX Classroom training on Title IXpolicy, rights 18
3/9/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forAdvisors 8
3/29/17 Title IX General Information for Divisionof Student Affairs staff 15
8/1/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forCoaches Retreat 25
8/8/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forHousing RAs and OAs 30
8/15/17 Title IX General Title IX Training for RISOAdvisors 4
8/16/17 Title IX General Title IX Training for NewFaculty Orientation 8
8/17/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forFinancial Aid Team 6
9/1/17 Title IX Title IX & Campus Resourcesfor Women’s Studies 200 Class 10
9/1/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forCAFNRM Dept. 12
9/19/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forLGBTQ+, Women’s & Pacific Island Student Centers 10
10/12/17 Title IX Online course for staff:Anti-harassment, VAWA Section 304, Awareness, Escalation +25
10/23/17 Title IX General Title IX Training for KaHaka`Ula 20
10/24/17 HI Act 206 Domestic Violence Awareness forEmployees, Know Your Rights Not Tracked
10/27/17 Title IX Due process, investigations,interim measures for Counseling 5
11/9/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forWomen’s Studies Class 15
11/9/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forsecond Women’s Studies Class 12
11/17/17 Title IX General Title IX Training for CASDepartment Chairs 17
11/21/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forMinority Access and Achievement Program (MAAP) 9
11/29/17 Title IX General Title IX Training for CoBE 10
12/1/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forHumanities Division 7
12/13/17 Title IX General Title IX Training forCollege of Education 8

UH Hilo Student Health and Wellness, Women’s and LBGTQ Centers, and Faculty Workshops

Dateof Training Title of Training Content Area Numberof Attendees
3/6/2017 Hawaiʻi Says No More Campaign at UH Hilo for Violence Prevention 18
3/8/2017 Hawaiʻi Says No More Campaign at UH Hilo for Violence Prevention 16
3/10/2017 Hawaiʻi Says No More Campaign at UH Hilo for Violence Prevention 15
3/13/2017 Alcohol/Substance Use Awareness Campaign 25
4/10/2017 Pau Violence Preventing Violence Awareness 23
4/12/2017 Pau Violence Preventing Violence Awareness 12
4/18/2017 SLAM Against Violence Awareness Activity 20
4/19/2017 Pau Violence Preventing Violence Awareness 18
Fall 2017 The Sistah Project 15 hr curriculum on empowering women,HIV/AIDS Awareness Not tracked
Fall 2017 The Bradda Project 15 hr curriculum on empowering men, HIV/AIDS Awareness Not tracked
10/16/17 Hawaiʻi Says No More Domestic Violence Awareness Not tracked
10/18/17 Clothesline Project Domestic Violence Awareness Not tracked
10/19/17 Wear Purple Day Domestic Violence Awareness Not tracked
10/19/17 Can I Kiss You? Sexual Harassment/Abuse Awareness Not tracked
2/18/17 The Vagina Monologues Women’s Issues Awareness (Sexual Assault, Abuse, Trafficking) 120 +
3/8/17 International Women’s Day Gender and Women’s Issues Awareness Not tracked
3/22/17 Film: ‘He Named Me Malala’ Fighting for Girls Rights, Gender Discrimination Awareness 10
4/18/17 Human Trafficking Town Hall Discussion – Raising Awareness 100 +
9/26/17 Learn to be a LGBTQ Ally LGBTQ Awareness Not tracked
10/11/17 National Coming Out Day LGBTQ Awareness Not tracked
10/18/17 Domestic Violence Awareness Training Group Encounter, Activity ad Awareness 50 +, flex activity
10/20/17 Dealingwith Anger Steps to Transformation/Non-violent Communication Not tracked
10/24/17 Blanketedby Blame Workshop Domestic Violence Awareness 40
10/26/17 Learnto be a LGBTQ Ally Weeklong Activities: LGBTQ Awareness Not tracked
11/16/17 Film: ‘Water Girl’ Advocacy against sex trafficking and overcoming abuse 9
11/16/17 UH Hilo Housing Open House Awareness of LGBTQ and Women’s Issues Resources 25 +
12/1/17 World Aids Day Awareness and support for HIV and AIDS Not tracked

2017 Crime Statistics

Offenses reported by hierarchy

Offense Year On Campus Non-Campus Public Property Total Residential Facilities¹ Unfounded Crimes
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter by Negligence 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 2017 1 0 0 1 1 0
Incest 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 2017 2 0 0 2 0 0
Burglary 2017 1 0 0 1 1 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 2017 5 0 0 5 4 0
Liquor Law Arrests 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law Arrests 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
WeaponsLaw Arrests 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2017 56 0 0 56 56 0
Drug Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2017 4 0 0 4 4 0
Weapons Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2017 1 0 0 1 1 0

¹ Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On-Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in both categories.

Offenses not reported by hierarchy

Offense Year On Campus Non-Campus Public Property Total Residential Facilities¹ Unfounded Crimes
Arson 2017 0 0 0 0 0 0
Domestic Violence 2017 1 0 0 1 0 0
Dating Violence 2017 3 0 0 3 0 0
Stalking 2017 1 0 0 1 0 0

¹ Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On-Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in both categories.

Hate Crime Reporting: There were no hate crimes reported in 2017.

2016 Crime Statistics

Offenses reported by hierarchy

Offense Year On Campus Non-Campus Public Property Total Residential Facilities¹ Unfounded Crimes
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter by Negligence 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Incest 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Aggravated Assault 2016 0 1 0 1 0 0
Burglary 2016 5 5 0 10 4 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 2016 5 5 1 11 1 0
Liquor Law Arrests 2016 2 0 0 2 0 0
Drug Law Arrests 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Weapons Law Arrests 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
LiquorLaw Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2016 64 2 0 66 60 0
Drug Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2016 14 2 0 16 10 0
Weapons Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0

¹ Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On-Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in both categories.

Offenses not reported by hierarchy

Offense Year On Campus Non-Campus Public Property Total Residential Facilities¹ Unfounded Crimes
Arson 2016 0 0 0 0 0 0
Domestic Violence 2016 3 0 0 3 1 0
Dating Violence 2016 3 0 0 3 1 0
Stalking 2016 0 1 0 1 0 0

¹ Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On-Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in both categories.

Hate Crime Reporting: There were no hate crimes reported in 2016.

2015 Crime Statistics

Offenses reported by hierarchy

Offense Year On Campus Non-Campus Public Property Total Residential Facilities¹ Unfounded Crimes
Murder/Non-Negligent Manslaughter 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manslaughter by Negligence 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rape 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Fondling 2015 1 0 0 1 1 0
Incest 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Statutory Rape 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Robbery 2015 1 0 0 1 1 0
Aggravated Assault 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Burglary 2015 2 4 0 6 0 0
Motor Vehicle Theft 2015 9 5 0 14 0 0
Liquor Law Arrests 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Drug Law Arrests 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Weapons Law Arrests 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Liquor Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2015 24 0 0 24 17 0
Drug Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2015 60 1 0 61 59 0
Weapons Law Violations Referred for Disciplinary Action 2015 1 0 0 1 0 0

¹ Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On-Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in both categories.

Offenses not reported by hierarchy

Offense Year On Campus Non-Campus Public Property Total Residential Facilities¹ Unfounded Crimes
Arson 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Domestic Violence 2015 0 0 0 0 0 0
Dating Violence 2015 1 0 0 1 0 0
Stalking 2015 2 0 0 2 0 0

¹ Note: Residential Facility Crime Statistics are a subset of the On-Campus Category, i.e. they are counted in both categories.

Hate Crime Reporting: There were no hate crimes reported in 2015.

2018 Annual Fire Safety Report

Required reporting date 10-1-2018.

In August of 2008, The Higher Education Opportunity Act was enacted and became a law (Public Law 110-315) which requires all Title IV eligible institutions that participate in any Title IV program and that maintain on-campus student housing facilities to publish an annual fire safety report, maintain a fire log, and report fire statistics to the Secretary of Education. Starting October 2010, the report must be publicly disclosed. This report presents the required fire statistics for the calendar year 2014 including the fire log for the 60-day period prior to the submittal of this report.

Fire Safety is an essential tool in protecting a campus community from injuries, deaths, business interruption, and property damage resulting from fires and related perils. Fire Safety includes education, training, and policies designed to ensure all students, staff and faculty of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo are aware of and understand the elements that help to ensure the safety of all.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo Environmental Health and Safety Office (EHSO) in collaboration with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa EHSO Fire Safety Program (EHSO/FSP) provides a fire safe campus environment by identifying and eliminating potential fire hazards through consistent and comprehensive building fire inspection procedures emphasizing compliance with all applicable fire and building codes. EHSO is responsible for fire safety building inspections, fire investigations, Uniform Fire and Building Code interpretations and technical assistance, new construction and building renovation plans review, emergency egress and relocation drills (fire drills), and the inspection, maintenance, and testing of all fire protection equipment on the UH Hilo campus. FSP also conducts education and training programs which include relevant lecture, audio/video presentations on fire safety awareness and hands-on fire extinguisher training to any on-campus group upon request.

Summary of EHSO Reporting Requirements

The Higher Education Opportunity Act (HEOA) (Code Reference DOE 34 CFR 600, 668, 675 Final Rule) requires that certain information pertaining to the Fire Safety in UH Hilo administered housing units of current or perspective students and employees be reported on and readily available for viewing by any interested party. This document will address the following:

  • Definition of Terms
  • Policies
  • Fire Safety Systems
  • Fire Drills
  • Reporting List
  • Future Improvements
  • Statistics
  • Fire Log
  • Disclosure of Information

Definition of Terms

Cause of Fire
The factor or factors that give rise to a fire. The causal factor may be, but is not limited to, the result of an intentional or unintentional action, mechanical failure, or act of nature.
Fire
Any instance of open flame or other burning in a place not intended to contain the burning or in an uncontrolled manner.
Fire Drill
A supervised practice of a mandatory evacuation of a building for a fire
Fire-related injury
Any instance in which a person is injured as a result of a fire, including an injury sustained from a natural or accidental cause while involved in fire control, attempting rescue, or escaping from the dangers of the fire. The term person may include students, faculty, staff, visitors, firefighters, or any other individuals.
Fire-related death
Any instance in which a person is killed as a result of a fire, including death resulting from a natural or accidental cause while involved in fire control, attempting rescue, or escaping from the dangers of a fire; or dies within one year of injuries sustained as a result of the fire.
Fire Safety System
Any mechanism or system related to the detection of a fire, the warning resulting from a fire, or the control of a fire. This system may include sprinkler systems or other fire extinguishing systems, fire detection devices, standalone smoke alarms, devices that alert one to the presence of a fire, such as horns, bells, or strobe lights; smoke-control and reduction mechanisms; and fire doors and walls that reduce the spread of a fire.

On-Campus Student Housing Facility

Regulatory Language: A dormitory or other residential facility for students that is located on an institution’s campus.

UH Fire Safety Program Definition: The HOEA applies to all residential facilities owned or controlled by the University within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area provided the building is owned by the University or on the main campus. If the residential housing facility is privately operated, not owned by the University and not located on the main campus then the facility is not included in this report.

Value of Property Damage – The estimated value of the loss of the structure and contents, in terms of the cost of replacement in like kind and quantity. This estimate should include contents damaged by fire, and related damages caused by smoke, water and overhaul; however, it does not include indirect loss, such as business interruption.

Policies

Safety Policies

Use of Electrical Appliances

Electrical appliances that are not allowed in the residence halls include, but are not limited to:

  • Appliances with open heating elements (such as toasters or hotplates),
  • George Forman type grills/sandwich makers,
  • space heaters, or
  • toaster ovens.

The University reserves the right to reject any electrical appliance that it considers as potentially hazardous to the safety of students and others. (These appliances may be permitted in Apartment Areas, provided they are utilized for their intended purpose)

Microwaves must not exceed a stated FCC rating of 800 watts. Microwaves must also be plugged directly into an outlet and have its FCC rating placard intact. Refrigerators must not exceed 2.9 cubic feet. Refrigerators must also be Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) approved and be kept clean and sanitary.

Residents in the residence halls are expected to use the community kitchens for any cooking needs.

Many prohibited items are specified in other relevant community standards within the Housing Judicial Process handbook. Other prohibited items include:

  • Heaters, dishwashers, washers and dryers
  • Dangerous chemicals
  • Candles, incense, oil lamps, open flame devices, potpourri pots
  • Homemade or modified electrical wiring
  • Gas, lighter fluid or any flammable liquid
  • Waterbeds, inflatables or mini-pools, etc.
  • Use of cooking appliances in residence hall rooms
  • Hookahs, bongs, pipes, rolling papers (glass pipes, water bongs, etc.)
  • Air conditioners, ceiling fans
  • Barbells in excess of 25lbs. each
  • Halogen lights/lamps
  • Laser pointers
  • Automobile batteries and acids
  • Personal Lofts or any other structure
  • Items deemed unsafe by Student Housing staff

Smoking

All University residence Halls and Apartments are Smoke-Free.

Residents may smoke cigarettes on Housing property only in designated outdoor smoking areas.

Smoking and/or chewing of plant-based intoxicants is not permitted inside Housing, on walkways, or within 20 feet of any building.

In areas where the use of tobacco products is permitted, users are responsible for the proper disposal of cigarette butts and related waste products. Failure to properly dispose of cigarette butts and related smoking product wastes on Housing property may result in fines and/or other disciplinary action.

For more detailed and the most current information, refer to the UH system-wide smoking policy.

Open Flames

Candles including incense candles or any open flame devices are prohibited in Residential facilities.

Fire Evacuation Procedures

  • Before a fire: Know the location of all exits from the building.
  • If a resident discovers a fire or smells smoke: Sound the building fire alarm. Know the locations of the fire hose stations and how they operate. Do not attempt to fight a fire due to the hazards associated with the products of combustion and the threat of spreading fire.
  • When the fire alarm sounds, all residents and their guests must leave at once: Lock the room/apartment door. Use the nearest safe exit. Upon exit from the building, proceed to a “safe” area at least 300 feet away from the building. Check the fire safety instructions on the back of the room/apartment door for specific instructions for that facility. Do not attempt to re-enter the building until residents are told that they can do so by hall staff.
  • Do no use the elevator: Elevator shafts are like chimneys; smoke and heat could enter the elevator shaft thereby asphyxiating the occupants of the elevator.
  • Feel the door that leads from a resident’s room: If it is hot or smoke is seeping in, do not open it. If a resident becomes trapped and cannot reach the fire exit, keep the door closed and seal off any cracks. Use the telephone to call Campus Security (808) 956-6911 and give the name and location of the building, the floor and room number. If the resident does not have a phone, go to the window and signal for help using a white- or light-colored pillowcase or sheet. Do not jump. The fire department will assist the resident.
  • If the door feels cool: Open it cautiously. Be braced to slam it shut if the hall is full of smoke or if the resident feels heat or pressure against the door. If the hall is clear, proceed to the nearest fire exit.
  • If caught in smoke or heat: Stay low where the air is better; take short breaths (through the nose), until the resident reaches a safe exit or area of refuge.

Important: Be sure fire exit doors and hallway doors are kept closed at all times. These doors prevent the spread of noxious smoke and heat should a fire occur. If a resident observes these doors propped or tied open, please close them and report the occurrence to the hall staff or community desk.

Residents with special needs or those who are unable to wake up to alarms should notify the hall staff of any assistance needs.

Fire Safety Education and Training

Fire safety awareness training is provided to Residential Assistants every year before the start of the Fall semester including hands-on fire extinguisher training. UH Hilo Student Housing conducts education and training briefings which include relevant lecture, audio/video presentations on fire safety awareness to residents at the start of each semester. Additional training and hands-on fire extinguisher training may be made available to any on-campus group upon request.

Fire Safety Systems

Building FA System Transmitter Monitored by Campus Security Sprinkler System (full) Smoke Detection Manual Pull Stations Fire Extinguishing Devices # Planned Evacuation Drills each calendar year³
Hale Kanilehua Simplex 4100U¹ Digitize DGM-8LS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Kanilehua Living/Learning Simplex 4100U Digitize DGM-8LS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale Kauanoe Edwards EST-2¹ Digitize DGM-8LS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–A Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–B Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–C Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–D Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–E Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–F Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–G Edwards IRC-3 See note 2 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻIkena–H Edwards IRC-3 Digitize DGM-8LS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale Kehau Simplex 4002-8001/Hochiki¹ Digitize DGM-8LS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2
Hale ʻAlahonua Edwards EST-3¹ Digitize DGM-8LS Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes 2

Notes:

  1. Hale Kanilehua, Hale Kauanoe, Hale Kehau, and Hale ʻAlahonua systems include remote annunciators which provide a secondary location for responders to view Fire Alarm Panel messages.
  2. Fire Alarm Panels at Hale Ikena buildings A-G report back to building H which sends the signal to Campus Security.
  3. Currently there are two planned drills each year (one per semester), additional drills may be added depending on circumstances.

Additionally, the corridors and rooms in Hale Kanilehua, Kauanoe and Hale Ikena are fire-rated construction. Hale Kehau consists of individual living spaces which exit to the exterior.

Fire Drills

Fire drills are to be conducted by Housing staff at the beginning of each semester. Drills may be announced or unannounced. Additional drills may be scheduled as needed.

  • January: (Start of Spring Semester) 12 Evacuation (fire) drills will be conducted at start of Spring Semester. Each dormitory will have a separate drill (total of 12 drills). Drill for Hale ʻIkena A-H may be conducted simultaneously.
  • August/September: (Start of Fall Semester) 12 Evacuation (fire) drills will be conducted at the start of the Fall Semester. Each dormitory will have a separate drill (total of 12 drills). Drill for Hale ʻIkena A-H may be conducted simultaneously.

Reporting List

For purposes of including a fire in statistics in the annual fire safety report, a list of titles of each person or organization to which students and employees should report that a fire occurred.

Name Title Phone Number/email
Campus Security 24-hour Dispatch line 972-7013/uhhsafe@hawaii.edu
Rick Murray Director, Campus Security 932-7644/ramurray@hawaii.edu
Kyle Fujiyoshi Interim Director, Student Housing 932-7407/fujiyosh@hawaii.edu
Ken Ikeda Director, EHSO 932-7638/keni@hawaii.edu
William Walters Director, Auxiliary Services 932-7858/wwalters@hawaii.edu

Future Improvements

Fire Safety Systems – Hale Kehau recently completed elevator upgrades which added fire recall functionality to the current system. There are no other planned upgrades to the fire alarm systems in Student Housing. Repair and maintenance will be conducted as required. Addition of devices to Kauanoe Fire Alarm System due to addition of emergency services kitchen facility has been completed.

Statistics

The institution must report statistics for each on campus student housing facility for the three most recent calendar years which data are available.

Fire Statistics Report for UH Hilo Student Housing Facilities

Residential Facility Date Time Cause of Fire Injuries that requiredtreatment at a Medical facility Deaths Related to Fire Value of Property Damage Incident report #

No fires reported in student housing facilities in 2017.

Fire Log

Fire Log: August – September 2018

Date Time Location Nature of Fire

No fires reported during this time period.

Note: No fires reported through posting date of 09-20-2018.

The fire log reports any reported fires within the last 60 day period prior to the submittal of the Annual Fire Report. The Annual Fire Report is submitted for the previous calendar year. Therefore, the Fire Log and Fire Statistics table (previous section) are separate and do not report fires that occur in the same calendar year.

The following is logged in the Fire Log:

  • date
  • time
  • location
  • nature of fire

The Fire Log must be open to the public for the most recent 60-day period. Please contact UH Hilo Campus Security for copies of the Fire Log.

Disclosure of Information

  1. Fire Log:
    1. Must maintain a written, easily understood fire log.
    2. Must make an entry or an addition to an entry within 2 business days of receipt of information
    3. Must make the fire log for the most recent 60-day period open to public inspection during normal business hours, and older logs available within 2 business days of request.
    4. Must be reported to the campus community on an annual basis through the annual fire safety report statistics log.
  2. Annual Fire Statics Report:
    1. Each year, by the date and in a form specified by the Secretary, an institution must submit the statistics to the Secretary.
    2. Will include: number of fires and the cause of each fire; number of injuries related to a fire that required treatment; number of deaths related to a fire; value of property damage caused by the fire.
  3. Annual Fire Safety Report:
    1. Must be distributed to enrolled students through appropriate publications and mailings or internet or intranet websites
    2. Must be distributed in brief form to current employees through notice of exact electronic address for internet or intranet websites with a statement that paper copies of full report available upon request.
    3. Must provide a notice to prospective students or prospective employees of the availability of the report, a description of the report contents and an opportunity to request a copy. The notice must also include the exact electronic address if the report is posted on an internet website, and include a statement that paper copies of full report available upon request.
    4. Will include: fire statistics as described previously; description of each on-campus student housing facility fire safety system, the number of fire drills held during the previous calendar year; the institutions policies or rules on portable electrical appliances, smoking, open flame in student housing facilities; the institutions procedures for student housing evacuation in case of a fire; policies regarding fire safety education and training programs provided to the students, faculty, and staff; a list of the titles of each person or organization to which students and employees should report that a fire occurred; plans for future safety improvements.
  4. Access to Annual Security Report:
    1. If the Annual Fire Safety report is published independently of the Annual Security Report, it must include information in each of the two reports about how to directly access the other report.

UH Hilo Higher Education Opportunity Act Reporting Form [2009-2010]

Policies (§668.49(b))

  • Safety Policies (Use of electrical appliances, Smoking, Open Flames)
  • Fire Evacuation Procedures
  • Fire Safety Education and Training

Fire Safety Systems

  • Campus list (spreadsheet) on description of fire safety systems for each facility.

Fire Drills

  • Fire Drill Log or Statement of drills

Reporting List

  • List of Emergency Contact numbers/names

Future Improvements

  • List or log of scheduled future improvement

Statistics

  • Campus Statistics Log for three (3) most recent calendar years

Publication

  • Exact electronic address or other information of how to access the UH Hilo Annual Security Report