Puna lava flow in graphics & maps, last updated Feb. 22, 2015

Map with overlay showing flow Size in Relation to Pahoa
Sept 20. 2014. Just for a rough idea, how big is the lava flow compared to the size of Pahoa? Kimura says the size of the flow changes, depending on terrain and other factors, and gives this image as a reference. His choice of locations in Pahoa is not based on any forecast — he picked those two places because a lot of people can easily visualize them in their heads.

 

Graphic showing flow size in Comparison to NYC
Sept. 20, 2014. This map of  New York City might help the mainland public understand the size of the active lava flow that’s likely to affect a lot of people in the District of Puna in the Big Island of Hawai‘i. In this image, Pahoa, the town in the path of the flow, would be located in lower Manhattan — at Washington Square Park.

 

Graphic showing flow Size in Comparison to LA
Sept. 20, 2014. This map of Los Angeles might help the mainland public understand the size of the active lava flow that’s likely to affect a lot of people in the District of Puna in the Big Island of Hawai‘i. In this image, Pahoa, the town in the path of the flow, would be located around the south of Westwood — at Westfield Century City.

 

Graphic showing flow Size in Comparison to SF
Sept. 20, 2014. A comparison map such as this of San Francisco might help the mainland public understand the size of the active lava flow that’s likely to affect a lot of people in the District of Puna on the Big Island of Hawai‘i. In this image, Pahoa, the town in the path of the flow, would be located somewhere around Financial District — at AT&T Park.

 

Aerial with overlay showing direction of lava flow.
Sept. 20, 2014. Here’s the latest USGS flow forecast to October 3 as of September 19, 2014 (hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/). As Kimura emphasized in his previous post, “Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change,” (USGS). In fact, their projection did change. This does not mean USGS is not doing its job; it simply means prediction/forecasting is extremely difficult.

 

Infographic showing Projection of Lava
Sept. 19, 2014. Kimura digitized the arrows on USGS image (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/), put them on Google Earth, and magnified the top arrow. Please note USGS page reads, “Lava flow behavior is complex and this projection is subject to change.”

 

Graphic and aerial photo showing distances between roads.
Sept. 18, 2014. A more comprehensive picture that shows where the lava flow front has been for the past three weeks, relative to Beach Rd, Railroad Ave, edge of Hawaiian Beaches and HI-130.

 

Graphic showing Distance of Flow Front to Hwy130
Sept. 18, 2014. This graph shows how the distance between the flow front and HI-130 has been shrinking over the past six weeks. When/if the line hits 0 (horizontal axis), the lava flow hits HI-130.

 

Map showing population per Census
Sept. 17, 2014. This image shows the population (Census 2010 data) of each local neighborhood, instead of the entire affected area.

Of the infographic above, Kimura says:

I wanted two things when I started this FB page: (1) people in lower Puna feel empowered (at least a little) by understanding the possible ramifications of the lava flow reaching the ocean; and (2) the rest of the world learns how serious the situation is and responds accordingly. This one is for the latter.

I don’t want people outside of Hawaii to just come here right before the lava hits a residential area (if it does) and simply enjoy the “show”. I want them to care. They need to know real people exist, not just the hot lava burning down the trees.

Aerial map showing Drive Times
Sept. 16, 2014. If residents in lower Puna had to use Chain of Craters Road to go to other parts of the island, how long would it take for them to get to that road? And how many people live in each “band” of driving time? This image shows approximate driving times from Kalapana (Intersection of H-130 and Pahoa Kalapana Rd) within the potentially affected area. (This is just a guideline–these numbers can easily change depending on many factors.)

 

Chart showing Volume of Lava
Sept. 15, 2014. How much lava is flowing? Here’s a contribution from Kimura’s mentor Steven Colbert, assistant professor of marine science with a specialty in geological science. Using the USGS estimate and data, Colbert compared the rate of the lava flow to that of the Wailuku River. The lava flow may seem slow, but the flow rate (gallons per minute) is much higher than that of Wailuku river today (9/15/2014) and close to the 85-year average.