Puna lava flow in graphics & maps, last updated Feb. 22, 2015

Graph showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 13, 2014. The lava flow progress chart as of this morning. The breakouts are advancing steadily. Caption of this chart by Kimura: “I don’t know how many times I had to change the range of the horizontal axis, secretly believing that I added enough space for the future dates (in spite of my disclaimers about the uncertainty of the lava flow). Everybody involved in this slow process has her/his internal conversations with Pele, and that’s one of the topics of my conversations with her–horizontal axis!”

 

Graph and aerial photo showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 11, 2014. A few active breakouts to keep an eye on.

 

Graph and aerial photo showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 10, 2014. Here’s a new progress chart with the new breakout by the transfer station, based on Civil Defense’s update this afternoon. The distance between Apa‘a St and HI-130 is different from the previous charts because Kimura is now using straight-line distances. Accordingly, the relationships between data points for the leading edge and Apa‘a St are not accurate.

 

Map showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 6, 2014. Emergency access route. See remarks below for details.

Remarks from Mark Kimura regarding the above mapping information:

I had a meeting with some staff members of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park this afternoon to share information and discuss potential future collaboration. I want to share two findings from the meeting:

1. The newly rebuilt road is not called “Chain of Craters Road”. The part that belongs to U.S. National Park Service (NPS) should be called “Chain of Craters Kalapana Road” and the part that belongs to the county is Highway 130. (See the image). You may think this is just a technicality, but it may become important for effective communication in the future.

2. Some blogs and Facebook posts reported that Chain of Craters Kalapana Road will be available only to the residents of lower Puna, but that is not true (or only partially true). Here’s a more accurate explanation I got:

  • The Chain of Craters Kalapana Road will become the emergency access route in and out of Puna after lava has crossed the other two main access routes (Hwy 130 and Railroad Avenue) and the NPS has determined the road to be safe for vehicles to cross.
  • The Emergency access route will be available for use by Puna residents affected by the lava flow and their invitees and agents, and the transportation of goods and services needed to sustain the community including vendors, contractors, and service providers. A free window decal to facilitate access through the park for affected Puna residents is being developed. More information on the decal will be forthcoming.
  • The public is invited to submit comments regarding the construction and use of the road and mitigation measures developed to protect the park resources. You can access the park’s compliance website at http://parkplanning.nps.gov/havo
  • The road will remain open to local residents and for uses to sustain the community until another long term viable route is established by the state or county.

It will take all of us working together to insure the safety and sustainability, economically and otherwise, of the community of Puna and protect the park and its resources. The NPS staff will be at the community meeting tonight. (Community meetings are held every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at the Pāhoa High School Cafeteria.)

 

Aerial photo showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 4, 2014. This is just for insight — Back in September, USGS-HVO posted a “projected path” of the lava flow (9/17, hvo.wr.usgs.gov/maps/). This image shows their projection back then and the lava flow as of 10/31. (Note that USGS always cautions that lava flow behavior is complex and their projections are subject to change.)

 

Graph and aerial photo showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 3, 2014. It has been four days since the flow front ceased advancing.

 

Google map showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 1, 2014. Kimura has created a permanent Google Map that he’s updating as the flow moves forward. Click on image above to go directly to Google Map. Once there, if you click on the yellow pin at the flow front, you’ll see the time stamp, so you can tell how fresh/old the data is. The yellow line shows 200 straight-line distance from Pahoa Village Rd.

 

Graph showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 1, 2014. The leading edge of the lava flow has stalled for several days now just above Pahoa Village Road.

 

Graph and aerial photo showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Nov. 1, 2014. Distance update. Source Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

Source of data for above graph: Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

 

Graph and aerial photo showing flow progress and distance from highway.
Oct. 30, 2014. 10/29 4:15 pm, 202 yards from Pāhoa Village Road (Hawaiian Volcano Observatory). 10/30 8:00 am, 160 yards from Pāhoa Village Road (Civil DefenseD). 10/30 2:45 pm 160 yards from Pāhoa Village Road (CD). 10/31 8:00 am 160 yards from Pāhoa Village Road (CD).