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Summer 2017 Course Descriptions

Registration begins April 3, 2017, 8:00am HST Please visit class availability for dates, schedule and location.

Course Descriptions by Subject

Agriculture (AG)

AG 194, Unmanned Aerial Systems Pilot, 3 credits
This course serves to train remote pilots on the proper procedures for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) operations including theoretical knowledge in preparation for the FAA Written Knowledge Exam.
AG 230, Sustainable Agriculture, 3 credits
Evaluation of conventional and alternative farming methods in the U.S., Polynesia, Southeast Asia, Africa and Latin America from a long-term perspective. Analysis of the effects of those practices on environmental quality, agrosystems, and food security. Consideration of conflicting values and resolution.
AG 294, UAS Intermediate Techniques, 3 credits
Students will build on the knowledge gained from AG 194 Unmanned Aerial Systems Pilot course in a lab setting. They will experience hands-on-controls flight instruction. Students will join their instructor in the field for flying techniques, maneuvers, troubleshooting, and emergency procedures.

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Animal Science (ANSC)

ANSC 185, Intro to Companion Animals, 3 credits
Introductions of common breeds of the dog and cat, proper physical examination, proper care and nutrition.

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 100, Cultural Anthropology, 3 credits
Humans as cultural and social beings. The major concepts and conclusions of cultural anthropology. Biological, social, and linguistic foundations of culture. Basic research methodology.
ANTH 347, Pidgins and Creoles, 3 credits
A study of the world's pidgins and creoles; the origin and nature of pidgins and creoles; the relationship of Hawaiian Creole English to other Creoles in the world; the link between the developments of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING 102 or LING 121. (Attributes: GAHP)
ANTH 354, Filipino Culture, 3 credits
Introduction to peoples and cultures of the Philippines. Topics include cultural origins, linguistics and cultural diversity, values, social structure, and overseas Filipino adaptations. (Same as FIL 354) (Attributes: GAHP)

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Art (ART)

ART 100, Intro Studio Seminar, 3 credits
An introductory studio exploration in a variety of media including mixed media. Presentations, critiques, and assigned readings for the purpose of comparative study and discussion.
ART 101, Intro to Visual Art, 3 credits
Slide/lecture course and introduction to the visual arts in their various forms and expressions.
ART 300, Intermediate Studio Seminar, 3 credits
Studio explorations in a variety of media including mixed media. Presentations, critiques, and assigned readings for the purpose of comparative study and discussion. Pre: Foundation Program Studios (ART 121, ART 122, ART 123, ART 124) and completion of two semesters of 200-level art studios. May be retaken for a total of 9 credits.

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Astronomy (ASTR)

ASTR 110, General Astronomy, 3 credits
A survey of modern astronomy intended for non-science majors; the structure and evolution of the solar system, stars, stellar systems, and the Universe. If students desire to take ASTR 110, 180, and 181, they may receive credit for ASTR 110 only if it is taken prior to taking ASTR 180 and ASTR 181.
ASTR 110L, General Astronomy Lab, 1 credit
Demonstration of astronomical principles through laboratory observations and analysis of astronomical data. Not required for ASTR 110. Pre: Credit or registration in ASTR 110, ASTR 180, or ASTR 181.
ASTR 150, Life in the Universe, 3 credits
The possibility that life might exist elsewhere in the universe has fascinated human beings ever since our ancestors first gazed into the starry sky. In this course, the question for extraterrestrial life is considered from astronomical, biological, and sociological perspectives. Topics include planets, stars and galaxies, the Big Bang, the origin and evolution of life on Earth, searches for extraterrestrial life, and more. A non-mathematical course for non-science majors who want to explore astronomy.
ASTR 352, Comparative Planetology, 3 credits
Study of the geology and geophysics of Earth-like planets and satellites in the Solar System, with emphasis on understanding terrestrial geology in a broader, astronomical context. Study of the atmospheres of Solar System planets and satellites, and also the formation and evolution of the Solar System and extrasolar planetary systems. Pre: GEOL 111, ASTR 180, PHYS 106 or PHYS 170. (Same as GEOL 352).
ASTR 394, Special Topic: Software Systems for Astronomy, 4 credits
SSFA (Software Systems for Astronomy) is a course that teaches students the basics they need to produce software tools and systems that astronomers and telescope operators find intuitive and efficient to operate. SSFA provides a bridge between these two disciplines, the branch of astronomy that teaches students practical observing skills and the branch of computer science that teaches students how to develop reliable, user-friendly, software systems. SSFA is a course on telescope and instrument control systems, observation planning tools, and data analysis software. Students will work with existing software tools and current design methodologies.  A required lab tied to the class will also be offered for hands on experiential learning.   In the lab students will implement their software designs and then apply the software systems they have created to real-life problems in astronomy. Lab exercises complement the presentations in control systems, planning tools, data analysis, and archiving given in the lectures. Team programming techniques and proven methods for providing robust software solutions are also exercised in the lab. Prerequisites: ASTR 110 or ASTR 180; CS 150.

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 101, General Biology, 3 credits
A one-semester introductory biology course for non-majors.
BIOL 176, Biology II, 3 credits
Biodiversity of animal-like protistans, invertebrates, and vertebrates. Animal tissues, sensory reception and integration, endocrine systems, support and movement, circulation and immunity, gas exchange, digestion, kidney function, reproduction and development. Population and community ecology, energy flow and biogeochemical cycles. BIOL 175 and BIOL 176 are each taught both semesters, and students may enroll in either (but not both) during either fall or spring semester.
BIOL 176L, Biology II Lab, 1 credit
Laboratory for Introductory Biology II. Laboratory exercises covering structure, function, and natural history of animal-like protistans, invertebrates and vertebrates; structure and function of animal tissues; reproduction and development; and community ecology. BIOL 176L should be taken concurrently with BIOL 176.
BIOL 243, Human Anatomy & Physiology I, 3 credits
Basic structure and function of human tissue and organ systems, including skeletal, integumentary, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, and immune systems.
BIOL 244, Human Anatomy & Physiology II, 3 credits
Basic structure and function of human tissue and organ systems, including digestive, urinary, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Pre: BIOL 243 or equivalent, or instructor's consent.
BIOL 275, Fundamental Microbiology, 3 credits
A survey or microbiology with emphasis on bacteria, viruses, infectious diseases and their control. Pre: one semester of college chemistry. Recommended: at least one semester of BIOL 101, BIOL 175 or BIOL 176. (Attributes: GCC)
BIOL 410, Biochemistry, 3 credits
Basic compositions and functions of biological matter, metabolic interconversions and transformations; the bioenergetics involved and the levels of control over these processes. Pre: BIOL 270 and CHEM 242.
BIOL 481, Tropical Island Ecology & Evolution, 3 credits
The major subdisciplines of ecology and evolutionary biology, with emphasis on the models and methodologies of areas of active research, especially as they relate to tropical islands. Taught using examples of published research. Pre: BIOL 280, BIOL 281-281L and BIOL 357-357L.
BIOL 481L, Tropical Island Ecology & Evolution Lab, 2 credits
Intensive field-laboratory supporting BIOL 481. Research topics selected from current fields of active research within tropical island ecology and evolution. Develop research hypotheses, gather data from field sites, analyze and interpret data and write reports in the style of scientific papers. Pre: concurrent enrollment in BIOL 481 required.

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Business (BUS)

BUS 100, Intro to Business, 3 credits
A study of business functions, methods of business operation, types of business ownership, and the role of business organizations in contemporary society.
BUS 394, Designing Your Life, 3 credits
This course is an opportunity to learn how designers approach problems in business and industry and then apply those same skills to your life. Observe, analyze, explore options, build, and refine based on what matters most so that you can shape your prototype - your career and life - into an experience that brings satisfaction and meaning. This will be a hands-on class, so be prepared to explore, have fun, and create opportunities.
This course is based on an extremely popular and successful course at Stanford University that has been developed over 15 years and is consistently rated by students as one of the most useful courses that they have taken. You can watch a three-minute video overview. Note: The UH Hilo versions of this course have been supplemented with additional material from other sources to enrich your learning experience.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 141, Survey Organic Chemistry & Biochemistry, 3 credits
Brief introduction to organic chemistry and selected topics in biochemistry.
CHEM 151, Elementary Survey of Chemistry, 3 credits
Introduction to basic chemical principles. Pre: competence in high school algebra as demonstrated by (a) the math placement test or (b) the first 20 questions of the ACS chemistry placement exam. (Both exams are offered at UH Hilo). Previously offered as CHEM 114
CHEM 151L, Elementary Survey of Chemistry Lab, 1 credit
Introduction to basic chemical laboratory principles and techniques. Pre: concurrent registration in CHEM 151 required. Previously offered as CHEM 114L
CHEM 161, General Chemistry I, 3 credits
A mathematically rigorous introduction to chemistry designed for majors in the natural sciences. Topics covered include measurement and problem solving, structure of atoms, molecules, and compounds; chemical equations, chemical quantities and aqueous reactions; behavior of gases; thermochemistry; quantum-mechanical model of the atom; periodic property of the elements; chemical bonding. Pre: Passing score on the chemistry placement exam. Previously Offered as CHEM 124
CHEM 161L, General Chemistry I Lab, 1 credits
Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Pre: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 161 or prior credit for CHEM 161. Previously offered as CHEM 124L
CHEM 162, General Chemistry II, 3 credits
A mathematically rigorous continuation of CHEM 161. Topics covered include liquids, solids and intermolecular forces; properties of solutions; chemical kinetics and equilibrium; acids and bases; aqueous ionic equilibrium; free energy and thermodynamics; electrochemistry. Pre: a grade of "C" (not "C-") or better in CHEM 161. Previously offered as CHEM 125
CHEM 162L, General Chemistry II Lab, 1 credit
Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Pre: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 162 or prior credit in CHEM 162. Previously offered as CHEM 125L
CHEM 241, Organic Chemistry I, 3 credits
The study of carbon compounds. Topics include molecular structure, stereochemistry, molecular spectroscopy, reactions and methods of preparation of principal classes of organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms. Pre: CHEM 162-162L or instructor's consent.
CHEM 241L, Organic Chemistry I Lab, 1 credit
Techniques of organic chemistry, including synthesis and qualitative analysis. Applications include spectroscopy and chromatography. Pre: concurrent registration in CHEM 241 required.
CHEM 242, Organic Chemistry II, 3 credits
The study of carbon compounds. Topics include molecular structure, stereochemistry, molecular spectroscopy, reactions and methods of preparation of principal classes of organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms. Pre: CHEM 241-241L or instructor's consent.
CHEM 242L, Organic Chemistry II Lab, 1 credit
Techniques of organic chemistry, including synthesis and qualitative analysis. Applications include spectroscopy and chromatography. Pre: concurrent registration in CHEM 242.

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Chinese (CHNS)

CHNS 381, Chinese Culture through Architecture & Gardens, 3 credits
This course introduces Chinese architecture and gardens as an important part of traditional Chinese culture. It starts with a brief introduction to Chinese history, philosophy, religions and literature, laying a foundation for understanding Chinese social structure, ideology, and religious and literary traditions. (Attributes: HPP)

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Communication (COM)

COM 240, Professional Communication, 3 credits
An overview of the various approaches to organizations, communication, public relations, leadership, and interviewing. Professional presentation, writing, small group problem solving and consulting skills are developed. Also addressed are diversity, technology, and globalization issues.
COM 251, Public Speaking, 3 credits
Analysis, preparation and delivery of speeches. Emphasis on content, organization and style.
COM 270, Intro to Theories of Human Communication, 3 credits
Examination of the theoretical foundations of the human communication discipline. Coverage of traditional and contemporary theories in such areas as interpersonal, small group, organizational, intercultural, public and mass communication.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 340, Money & Banking, 3 credits
Relation of monetary system to price level, employment and income; nature and functions of money and banking; role of money in international trade and inflation. Pre: ECON 131.

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Education (ED)

ED 210, Introduction to Teaching, 3 credits
This course is an introduction to education with an emphasis on the following topics: the teaching profession, the analysis of reasons for entering teaching and factors that influence these reasons; the characteristics of the present teaching force; complexities of teaching; the current trends and issues in education; and the role of the school within the community. Student will be provided an opportunity for voluntary field experience totaling 10 hours. (Attributes: GCC)
ED 310, Foundations of Education, 3 credits
Introduction to the practice of thinking and the development of intelligence within the complexities of a diverse and transforming society. Historic aspects of education are explored along with philosophical and political movements so students understand education's potential. Critical thinking skills are developed to help students think seriously about education as a potential career. Must be taken for grade. Pre: GPA of 2.5 and junior standing, or instructor's consent.
ED 314, Educational Technology, 3 credits
Introduction to the theory and application of multimedia educational technology principles in 21st century learning environments. Course is contextualized in project-based and place-based learning. Special emphasis on Hawaiian and Pan Pacific history and culture. Must be taken for a grade. Pre: CS 101 or equivalent, junior standing or instructor's consent. (Attributes: GAHP)
ED 350, Developmental Concepts of Learning, 3 credits
Theories of development focusing on the integration of physical, social, emotional and cognitive development during the school-aged years, children (grades K-6) and adolescents (grades 7-12). Systematic observation and analysis of behavior of school-aged children at home, in the community and at school. Must be taken for grade. Pre: GPA of 2.5 and junior standing or instructor's consent.
ED 394, Special Topics: Educating Children with Exceptional Needs
This course will provide an overview of educating students with exceptional needs. The path will begin with a brief history of Special Education in the United States and Hawaii, a history of community accessibility, and current research in special education practice with a focus on inclusive practices. We will continue by becoming familiar with the Individualized Education Program process and how to most effectively implement modifications and accommodations in the classroom.
ED 625, Seminar in Teaching Fld, 3 credits
Study in trends, research, and problems of implementation in interdisciplinary teaching. Pre: acceptance into the M.Ed. Program or instructor's consent.
ED 640, Learner Development, 2 credits
Introduction to theories of learner development, including cognitive, linguistic, emotional, personality, and moral/ prosocial development of students (grades K-12). Exploration of developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences. Pre: Admission to MAT program.
ED 643, Learning Environments I, 1 credit
Introduction to theory and practice of classroom management at the elementary and secondary school level. Exploration of student motivation and communication techniques as related to the establishment of a positive learning environment. Pre: Admission to the Master of Arts in Teaching program. Co-req: ED 640, ED 650, ED 660, and ED 670.
ED 650, Teaching in Hawaii’s Schools, 1 credit
Introduction to culture-based instructional practice, including overview of Na Hopena A╩╗o, to integrate Hawaiian history, language, and culture in effective planning, content knowledge, and assessment of student learning experiences. Pre: Admission to the Masters of Teaching program. Co-req: ED 640, ED 643, ED 660, and ED 670
ED 660, Professional Responsibility, 1 credit
Overview of professional licensure standards and professional attributes. Professional development through field experiences in local schools. Pre: Admission to the MAT program.
ED 670, Field Experience I, 1 credit
Practical application of theories of learner development, learning environments, and instructional planning in local schools. Introduction to schools as learning communities. Pre: Admission to the Master of Arts in Teaching program. Co-req: ED 640, ED 643, ED 650, ED 660.

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English (ENG)

ENG 100, Composition I, 3 credits
Instruction and practice in writing clear, effective university-level essays and research paper. Attention to all stages of the process: generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. Pre: ENG 100 on Writing Placement Examination.
ENG 100T, Composition with Tutorial, 3 credits
Instruction and practice in writing clear, effective university-level essays and research paper. Attention to all stages of the process: generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. Attending regular sessions is required. Equivalent to ENG 100 or ESL 100. Pre: ENG 100T on Writing Placement Examination.
ENG 200B, Intro to Literary Genres: Drama, 3 credits
An introduction to major genres in literature. The course will be offered at various times with different focuses: (A) Short Story and Novel; (B) Drama; (C) Poetry; (D) Popular Fiction; (E) Mythology and Folklore; (F) Autobiography; (G) Introduction to Graphic Novels and Comics. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T. (Attributes: GH)
ENG 204, Intro to Race/Gender Film Studies, 3 credits
This course will focus on how race and gender historically shape individual and cultural experiences in America, as expressed in film. Key works that offer portrayals by and about various groups (i.e. gays/lesbian, immigrants, indigenous communities, mixed-race populations, etc.) will be critically compared and examined. Students will also discuss and address evolving audience responses to these works. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as WS 204)
ENG 209, Writing for Business, 3 credits
Working from logical and rhetorical principles, this course prepares students to write in the informative, analytical, and persuasive modes required for their major field and in their careers. Intended for students majoring in Business and related fields. Includes a formal research project and report. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T.
ENG 225, Writing for Science and Technology, 3 credits
Working from logical and rhetorical principles, this course prepares students to write about science and technology in their academic disciplines and careers. Assignments include synthesis, process analysis, and argumentation. Intended for students majoring in the applied and natural sciences. Includes a formal research project and report. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.
ENG 323, Literature of Hawai╩╗i, 3 credits
A critical analysis of the history of literature in the Hawaiian Islands. Study will touch upon the politicization of the Hawaiian language, the insider/outsider debate, the emergence of local literature, and ethnic/racial divides in contemporary discussions of literary craft and study. Class will include oral narratives (chants, hula), expatriate literature (Bingham, London, Michener), and a wide range of local texts. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent (Attributes: GAHP, GCC, HPP)
ENG 345, Children & Literature, 3 credits
Literature in English for and by children, with special emphasis on the ways in which literature promotes social, emotional, and intellectual development. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, ESL 100T or instructor's consent.
ENG 347, Pidgins and Creoles, 3 credits
A study of the world's pidgins and creoles with special reference to the Pacific region; the origin and nature of pidgins and creoles; the relationship between Hawai╩╗i Creole English to other Creoles in the world. The link between the development of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING 102 or LING 121. (Same as ANTH/LING 347) (Attributes: GAHP)
ENG 356, Language and Gender, 3 credits
Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T and LING 102, or instructor's consent. (Same as LING/WS 356)
ENG 466, The Contemporary Fairy Tale, 3 credits
A study of a representative range of contemporary fairy tales in English, which incorporates current theories and analytical approaches to literary fairy tales and the politics of interpretation. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

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Filipino (FIL)

FIL 330, Filipino Films, 3 credits
This is a survey course on Philippine cinema presented in in Filipino with English subtitles. In this course students will be taught how to watch and listen to films; then identify and analyze various issues within Philippine socio-political contexts. Through lectures, discussions, and various classroom activities, students will develop critical thinking skills necessary for investigating ethical issues in Philippine films. (Attributes: GAHP, GCC, HPP)
FIL 354, Filipino Culture, 3 credits
This course is an introduction to peoples and cultures of the Philippines. Topics include cultural origins, linguistic and cultural diversity, values, social structure and overseas Filipino adaptation. This course is cross-listed with ANTH 354. (Attributes: GCC, HPP)

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Geography (GEOG)

GEOG 120, Weather & Climate Hawaii, 3 credits
For non-science majors and prospective science teachers. Basic meteorology, sun-earth-ocean-atmosphere interrelationships, weather types, seasonal changes, trade winds, clouds, rainfall, with examples drawn from the local weather and climate. (Same as PHYS 120) (Attributes: GAHP, GCC, HPP)
GEOG 325, Legal Geography, 3 credits
In this course, we will explore and examine a variety of places that upon first consideration, do not seem either legal or political. We will investigate a variety of types of places and spaces that carry legal and political weight in our everyday lives. Themes of consumption, expression, access, accommodation, culture, sex, race, living, national identity, community, discipline, and property will guide our inquiry into the relationship between law, politics, and spatial habitation. (Same as POLS 325). (Attributes: GCC)

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Geology (GEOL)

GEOL 352, Comparative Planetology, 3 credits
Study of the geology and geophysics of Earth-like planets and satellites in the solar system, with emphasis on understanding terrestrial geology in a border, astronomical context. Study of the atmosphere of solar system planets and satellites, and also the formation and evolution of the solar system and extra solar planetary systems. Pre: GEOL 111, ASTR 180. (Same as ASTR 352).

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Hawaiian (HAW)

HAW 101, Elementary Hawaiian I, 4 credits
Development of listening, speaking, reading and writing and analytical skills at the elementary level of auxiliary language. Taught within the context of the contemporary culture of the Hawaiian people. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)
HAW 102, Elementary Hawaiian II, 4 credits
Continuation of HAW 101. Pre: HAW 101 or placement exam. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)

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Hawaiian Studies (HWST)

HWST 111, Hawaiian Ohana, 3 credits
The culture of the Hawaiian people as expressed in the home and family. The position of the family as the basis of the larger Hawaiian society and culture. Both ancient and modern aspects covered; extensive use of Hawaiian terminology. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)
HWST 175, Intro Music of Polynesia, 3 credits
A general survey of the indigenous and acculturated music of eight major Polynesian island groups: Tonga, Samoa, New Zealand, Cook Islands, Society Islands, Marquesas Islands, Easter Island and Hawai╩╗i. Music is viewed as both an organization of sound and as a product of culture and people. (Same as MUS 175). (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)

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History (HIST)

HIST 152, World History since 1500, 3 credits
A global and historical survey focusing on human societies and cross-cultural interactions to 1500 C.E.
HIST 284, History of Hawai╩╗i, 3 credits
A survey course in the history of the Hawaiian Islands from Polynesian origins to contemporary multi-cultural society. Traces the impact of major events and historical figures upon Hawaiian society and also considers the Hawaiian response to these changes. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)
HIST 339, Athletics & Health in Hawai╩╗i, 3 credits
This survey course examines the role of fitness/athletics and health-related activities in Hawaiian lifestyles, prior to foreign arrivals through to the late 20th century. The course also examines the consequences of political, economic, and cultural change on Native Hawaiian health-related activities and practices. (Same as KES 339)
HIST 398, Special Topic: The History of Chocolate, 3 credits
This course will take a global view of the history of chocolate largely within the context of the “Columbian Exchange” (i.e. post 1492) considering chocolate's role in cultural exchange, biological exchange, and economic exchange.┬á┬á In other words, we will be combining natural history with the cultural and economic history of this global and to some, essential, commodity. Interdisciplinary course readings will introduce us to the history of cacao cultivation, the global chocolate industry, the diverse cultural constructions surrounding chocolate, and the implications for chocolate’s future.

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Ke╩╗elik┼Źlani Education (KED)

KED 341, Ulu Ke Keiki, 3 credits
This course will examine child development from a Hawaiian perspective. This course will examine Hawaiian principles and philosophy of child development, current child development research and studies, and appropriate curriculum, pedagogy and evaluation aligned with child growth and development. This course is taught solely in the Hawaiian language. Pre: KHAW 204 or equivalent (which may be taken concurrently) and permission of the instructor.
KED 620, Foundations for Hawaiian Medium Education, 3 credits
Goals of Hawaiian medium education and their cultural, philosophical, historical and legal bases. Basic tools for planning, developing, delivering and evaluating instruction of Hawaiian-speaking children, including techniques for management and age-appropriate development from a Hawaiian cultural base. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission from College.
KED 621, Language Arts in Hawaiian Med Education, 2 credits
Literacy in Hawaiian and associated comprehension and speaking skills. Teaching other languages, including English, to Hawaiian-literate students. Use and teaching of oral and written literature in dramatized presentations. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission from the College.
KED 623, Social Studies in Hawaiian Medium Education, 2 credits
Major global and local social processes that affect the lives of Hawaiian-speaking children and their families. Integration of social studies and practical arts with a Hawaiian historical and cultural perspective. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission of the College.
KED 625, Physical Education in Hawaiian Medium Education, 1 credit
Group and individual expression to convey thoughts and emotions through various media including music, fine arts, dance, fitness and computer technology. Understanding and appreciation of such expressions and their integrations into Hawaiian tradition. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission from the Academic Studies Division, Ka Haka ╩╗Ula O Ke╩╗elikolani College.
KED 626, Science in Hawaiian Med Education, 2 credits
Scientific concepts within a Hawaiian cultural and environmental framework. Techniques for teaching content, problem-solving, and critical thinking to Hawaiian children. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission from the Academic Division, Ka Haka ╩╗Ula O Ke╩╗elikolani College.
KED 627, Math in Hawaiian Med Ed, 2 credits
Mathematical concepts within a Hawaiian cultural and environmental framework. Techniques for teaching content, problem-solving and critical thinking to Hawaiian-speaking children. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission from the Academic Division, Ka Haka ╩╗Ula O Ke╩╗elikolani College.
KED 628, Arts in Hawaiian Med Ed, 1 credit
Group and individual expression to convey thoughts and emotions through various media including music, fine arts and dance. Understanding and appreciation of such expressions and their integration in Hawaiian tradition. Conducted in Hawaiian. Pre: Permission from Academic Division, Ka Haka ╩╗Ula O Ke╩╗elikolani College.

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Kinesiology and Exercise Science (KES)

KES 202, Health Promotion, 3 credits
This course is designed for students to understand health in the broadest sense of the word -- as an integrated process for discovering, using, and protecting all possible resources within the individual, 'ohana, community, and environment.
KES 206, Basic Human Movement, 3 credits
Developing skills to understand the nature and function of human movement in everyday life, sport, dance, physical education, and adapted movement activities.
KES 250, Foundation of Public Health, 3 credits
An introduction to public health practice and history, with focus on principles and tools for population health, disease prevention, health promotion, health professions and healthcare systems.
KES 310, Basic Motor Learning, 3 credits
Basic understanding of the principles of motor learning and performance in a variety of contexts including teaching, coaching, design of performer-friendly equipment and work environments, and everyday motor skill learning.
KES 339, Athletics & Health in Hawai╩╗i, 3 credits
This survey course examines the role of fitness/athletics and health-related activities in Hawaiian lifestyles, prior to foreign arrivals through to the late 20th century. The course also examines the consequences of political, economic, and cultural change on Native Hawaiian health-related activities and practices. (Same as HIST 339)
KES 340, Science: Diet & Weight Control, 3 credits
This course presents a basic understanding of the multiple factors involved with body weight control and health. This course centers on the important scientific factors of body weight control, including energy balance, basal metabolism, hunger versus appetite, nutritional function and needs, nature versus nurture of obesity, treatment of obesity, physical activity and its importance in weight control and maintenance. Eating disorders and medical interventions such as gastric bypass surgery will be presented.
KES 350, Health Promotion Program Planning, 3 credits
Student develop skills to effectively plan, design, implement, and evaluate health promotion programs in community/public health settings. Pre: KES 202
KES 368, Sports and Exercise Nutrition, 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to the importance of nutrition in the field of exercise sciences. The purpose of this course is to bridge between nutritional concepts and exercise concepts, and the practical applications. Pre: KES 207.
KES 370, Sport Psychology, 3 credits
Survey of methods and findings in the application of psychological principles in sport. Topics include arousal and anxiety, cognitive processes, team performance, coaching behavior and techniques to maximize sports performance. (Same as PSY 370)
KES 394, Endocrinology: The Wild and Wacky World of Hormones, 3 credits
This course introduces the student to the endocrine system, and the body’s wild and often wacky coordination of body functions galore by chemical messengers. The course will explore how the body depends upon this complex system to grow, maintain itself, respond to outside and inside irritations and perturbations, and fight diseases. Exercise and the endocrine system will be introduced in the course.
KES 440, Physiology of Aging
Study of the physiological mechanisms and the effects of aging on the human systems including the cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, neurological, sensory, metabolic, and endocrinological. This course will present the topic of physiology of exercise and aging. Pre: BIOL 125.

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Linguistics (LING)

LING 102, Introduction to Linguistics, 3 credits
A broad introduction to general linguistics: survey of phonology, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis, and historical and comparative linguistics. (Formerly LING 203/ENG 203).
LING 347, Pidgins and Creoles, 3 credits
A study of the world's pidgins and Creoles with special reference to the Pacific region; the origin and nature of pidgins and Creoles; the relationship of Hawaiian Creole English to other Creoles in the world; the link between the development of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING 102 or LING 121. (Same as ANTH 347 and ENG 347) (Attributes: GAHP)
LING 356, Language and Gender, 3 credits
Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: ENG 100/ESL 100 or ENG 100T/ESL 100T and LING 102, or instructor's consent. (Same as ENG 356 and WS 356)
LING 422, Languages in Hawai╩╗i, 3 credits
This course explores the linguistic situation of Hawai╩╗i with a focus on the history, structure, and political situation of the diverse set of languages spoken in the Islands. Languages to be examined include, but are not limited to, Hawaiian, Hawaiian Creole English, Japanese, Chinese, Ilocano, Portuguese, and Korean. Pre: LING 102 (Attributes: GCC, HPP)

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Management (MGT)

MGT 425, Business Planning for New Ventures, 3 credits
Development of a business plan for a new venture with attention to form of business organization; competitive advantage; accounting systems and controls; financial, marketing, human relations, operations and risk management; government regulation and compliance; social responsibility. Identification of sponsors and sources of help for small business. Pre: Admission to Professional Business Program, C or better in any 200-level ENG course, C or better in ECON 130 or BUS 100, and C or better in QBA 260. (Attributes: GCC)

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Marine Science (MARE)

MARE 140, Intro to Hawaiian Coral Reefs, 3 credits
Explore the underwater world of the Big Island of Hawai╩╗i while learning about unique marine ecosystems found nowhere else on Earth. Students will acquire an appreciation for local aquatic fauna in the classroom including the basics of marine biology and natural history. Pre: concurrent enrollment in MARE 140L required. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)
MARE 140L, Intro to Hawaiian Coral Reefs Lab, 1 credit
Students will enter the natural laboratory that is Hawai╩╗i and investigate coral reefs, coastal beaches and tide pool systems with mask, snorkel and fins. Learn to identify common marine inhabitants while enjoying an unparalleled educational experience under the sea. Concurrent enrollment in MARE 140 is required. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)
MARE 171, Marine Biology-Diversity, 3 credits
Marine organisms: classification, structure, physiology, ecology and adaptations to the marine environment. This course satisfies College of Arts and Sciences General Education Natural Science requirement.
MARE 240, Small Boat Operations/Research, 3 credits
This course is intended to provide the novice boater with skills needed to safely operate and conduct research from a small boat. Topics include: state and federal regulations, safety, navigation, small boat handling, and conducting research operations. The course will consist of lectures, lab sessions, and time on the water in a small boat. Participants must be able to swim. Pre: Instructor's consent.
MARE 250, Statistical Apps in Marine Science, 3 credits
Hands-on approach to designing field experiments, collection of ecological data, analysis of data on computers using statistical methods, and presentation of results. Requires completion of a project using data collected in the field followed by the preparation of both written and oral reports. Pre: MARE/BIOL 171 or MARE 201, or instructor's consent.
MARE 264, QUEST, 3 credits
The application of commonly utilized nearshore underwater ecological surveying techniques using SCUBA. Intensive two-week course combining lecture and field work. Data will be collected in the field, reduced, analyzed and presented in an oral report. Pre: Authorization as a scientific diver in training before start of course and instructor's consent.
MARE 298, N─ü Wa‘a a Mau┼Ź (the canoes which sustain us), 3 credits
This course will introduce students to the use of wa╩╗a, 6-man outrigger canoes, in scientific research throughout Hawai╩╗i and train in introductory voyaging techniques using a double-hull voyaging canoe. During this course students will learn the components of the wa╩╗a, traditional uses of wa╩╗a, and the use of wa╩╗a for scientific data collection in shallow water reef systems of Hawai╩╗i Island. Students will conduct ocean research from a Hawaiian perspective using traditional Hawaiian tools in combination with western science methods. Through this all encompassing approach to ocean resource management students will learn the arts of Hawaiian navigation, observation, and place naming that will enhance their interest in ocean conservation and strengthen their relationship with the natural resources of Hawai╩╗i.
MARE 364, Advanced QUEST, 3 credits
Students lead a dive team learning underwater ecological surveying techniques; supervise field data collection, data reduction and analysis, and team presentation of written and oral reports; and assist in training students in identification of marine organisms. Pre: BIOL/MARE 264, authorization as a scientific diver in training before start of course, and instructor's consent. Student receives CR/NC for the course.
MARE 380, Natural History of Sharks and Rays, 3 credits
This course will examine the natural history of the Elasmobranchs, an ancient group of fishes that have existed for almost 450 million years. Comprehensive investigations of sharks, rays, skates, sawfishes, and chimera, along with representative species from Hawai╩╗i, will be conducted. Subjects will include evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology, conservation and management of these unique animals. Discussions of current research papers along with group research projects will be covered during lectures Pre: MARE 171 or instructor's consent.
MARE 380L, Natural History of Sharks and Rays Lab, 1 credit
This course will further examine Elasmobranchs using a hands-on approach to compliment the work done in Lecture using both laboratory and field-based activities. Laboratory sessions will involve detailed dissections of shark, ray, skate, and chimera functional anatomy. Students will also participate in a tagging study of coastal shark species throughout the Big Island of Hawaii. Pre: Concurrent enrollment in MARE 380.
MARE 490, Sea Turtle Conservation & Ecology, 3 credits
All-encompassing look at the natural history of these ancient marine vertebrates. Topics include investigations of sea turtles, sea snakes, saltwater crocodiles and marine iguanas throughout the world. Subjects will consist of conservation and management, human impacts, reproductive and feeding ecology, evolution, taxonomy, and anatomy and physiology of these unique marine animals. Pre: MARE 265 or equivalent or instructor's consent.
MARE 490L, Sea Turtle Conservation & Ecology Lab, 1 credit
Field and lab techniques employed by sea turtle biologists including shore and underwater photo-surveys, forage surveys, and evaluation of nests and hatchlings. Investigations will focus on local species of sea turtles. Pre: MARE 490 or concurrent enrollment.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 100, Survey of Math, 3 credits
Survey of Mathematics course is intended primarily for non-science liberal arts majors to satisfy the university's quantitative reasoning requirement. Core topics include mathematical logic and mathematical thinking and problem solving. Additional topics may include number systems, computers, algebra, and probability. Pre: None.
MATH 103, Intro to College Algebra, 3 credits
For students who need to improve algebraic skills prior to taking Pre-calculus or Applied Calculus, or for courses in Introductory Chemistry, Physics or Statistics. Topics include exponents and radicals, factoring, systems of equations, linear equations, quadratic equations, general properties of functions, graphing, polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions.
MATH 121, Intro to Stats & Probability, 3 credits
Utilizes basic statistical topics including measures of central tendency and dispersion, classification of variables, sampling techniques, elementary probability, normal and binomial probability distributions, tests of hypothesis, linear regression and correlation to solve programs.
MATH 125, Applied Calculus, 3 credits
The course emphasis is on computations and applications to Business and Life Sciences. Topics include derivatives, curve sketching, optimization, exponential and logarithmic functions, integration and applications in these areas. Pre: C or better in MATH 103, or recommendation from the Math Placement Test. (Previously offered as MATH 115)
MATH 135, Precalc: Elementary Functions, 3 credits
Investigates linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic functions, and relevant topics. This course is the first part of the precalculus sequence. Pre: C or better in MATH 103, or an appropriate recommendation on the Math Placement Test. (Previously offered as MATH 104F)
MATH 140X, Precalculus, 4 credits
MATH 140X is an accelerated one semester course on the material covered in the sequence 135-140. Topics include the essential pre-calculus skills needed for success in calculus: functions, with special attention to polynomial, functions; plane trigonometry; and polar coordinates. Credit may not be earned for both MATH 140 and MATH 140X Pre: B+ or better in MATH 103, or C or better in Math 135, or an appropriate recommendation on the Math Placement Test. (Previously offered as MATH 104)
MATH 205, Calculus I, 4 credits
First half of a standard first year calculus sequence intended primarily for Natural Science majors. Topics include differential calculus, applications, and an introduction to integration. Pre: C or better in MATH 140X or MATH 140, or an appropriate recommendation on the Math Placement Test.
MATH 206, Calculus II, 4 credits
Second semester of a standard first year calculus sequence intended primarily for Natural Science majors. Topics include applications of the definite integral, techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. Pre: C or better in MATH 205.
MATH 311, Intro to Linear Algebra, 3 credits
Algebra of matrices, linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, diagonalization and basic applications. Pre: C in MATH 206, and MATH 310 or CS 241.

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Music (MUS)

MUS 166, Music in World Cultures, 3 credits
Explores music as an aspect of human culture focusing on selected non-Western music styles from Asia, Africa, and the Americas.
MUS 175, Intro Music of Polynesia, 3 credits
A general survey of the traditional and acculturated music of eight major Polynesian island groups: Tonga, Samoa, New Zealand, Cook Islands, Society Islands, Marquesas Islands, Easter Island, and Hawai╩╗i. Music is viewed as both an organization of sound and as a product of culture and people. (Same as HWST 175) (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)

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Nursing (NURS)

NURS 348, Human Pathophysiology, 3 credits
This course explores concepts of the biological basis for disease in adults and children. Alterations in normal body functions leading to disease and discomfort of the individual will be presented with an organized framework. Note: Restricted to Nursing and Pre-Nursing students only.
NURS 360, Health Care Policy, 3 credits
Analyses of local, national and global economic, legal and social factors impacting health care policies. Discussion of relationship between emerging social issues/trends and health care disparities and capacities. Discussion of social justice, cultural competence, and equity in access and delivery of health care services. Opportunities are provided to participate in political processes impacting nursing and health care policy. (Same at SOC 360)
NURS 372, Spirituality in Health Care, 3 credits
An examination of the role of spirituality in patient care for clients of multicultural backgrounds across the life span. Exploration of spirituality as an integral part of self.
NURS 375, Applied Human Nutrition, 3 credits
Applied nutrition in human health and disease, and the nurse's role in supporting nutritional care. Pre: one chemistry and one anatomy/physiology course, or consent of instructor. Note: Restricted to Pre-nursing and Nursing students only.
NURS 606, Rural Health Promotion, 3 credits
Focus is on the responsiveness of organizational health services to health needs of populations, individuals, and families in rural communities. The impact of political, ecological, economic and cultural factors on community health in rural areas will be analyzed. Utilization of evidence-based processes and collaborative leadership in designing and structuring health promotion services to address rural community needs are emphasized.
NURS 606L, Rural Health Promotion Lab, 3 credits
This is a supervised advanced practice practicum focusing on health promotion and clinical management of the health concerns of adult clients as commonly encountered in diverse and rural primary care settings. Emphasis will be placed on culturally appropriate evidence-based practice, consultation, research and evaluation. Three (3) semester hours of supervised practicum hours (135 clock hours) are required.
NURS 608L, Primary Care of Older Adults Lab, 3 credits
This supervised advanced practice practicum focuses on promotion and clinical management of the health concerns of older adult clients as commonly encountered in diverse and rural primary care settings. Emphasis will be placed on culturally appropriate evidence-based practice, consultation, research and evaluation. Three (3) semesters of supervised practicum hours (135 clock hours) are required.
NURS 613, Program Development/Evaluation, 3 credits
This course builds on the synthesis of evidence-based know- ledge for a specific culturally diverse clinical target population/practice. Students will identify and propose appropriate strategies for organizational/practice program development and evaluation. An innovative policy action plan for a population of interest based on an understanding of the cultural, financial, legal, and human resource needs of the health care environment is developed.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 209, Reasoning, 3 credits
Informal logic: Study of practical reasoning, argument, and the use and misuse of language. Emphasis on development of critical thinking skills.
PHIL 304, Philosophy & Cultural Diversity, 3 credits
Philosophical examination of the meaning of cultural diversity and pluralism for questions concerning community and knowledge from a variety of American and non-western cultures as well as their interactions with categories of identity, based upon nation, race, class, gender and sexuality. Addresses the interactions of the social experience of individuals based upon categories of identity and the emergence of forms of community and knowledge. A global or transnational section will be one component of the course. (Same as WS 304). (Attributes: GCC)
PHIL 316, Science, Technology & Society, 3 credits
Impact of science and technology on various philosophical issues. Through a variety of readings that exemplify the field's content, students will examine the social, political, aesthetic, ethical, economic, and environmental constructs that shape modern institutions in science and technology. (Same as WS 316)

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Physics (PHYS)

PHYS 106, College Physics, 3 credits
Principles of physics with the use of algebra and trigonometry. Covers electricity mechanics, oscillations, fluids, waves, kinetic theory and thermodynamics. Pre: MATH 140x or MATH 140 or MATH 125. See also PHYS 170L which serves as the lab course.
PHYS 120, Weather & Climate Hawaii, 3 credits
For non-science majors and prospective science teachers. Basic meteorology, sun-earth-ocean-atmosphere interrelationships, weather types, seasonal changes, trade winds, clouds, rainfall, with examples drawn from the local weather and climate. (Same as GEOG 120). (Attributes: GAHP, GCC, HPP)
PHYS 170L, Gen Physics I Lab, 1 credit
A required laboratory supplement for PHYS 106 and PHYS 170; covers basic principles of experimentation and physical measurement. Presents illustrative experiments in mechanics, heat and waves. Pre: PHYS 106 or PHYS 170 (either of which can be taken concurrently).
PHYS 171L, Gen Physics II Lab, 1 credit
A required laboratory supplement for PHYS 107 and PHYS 171; presents illustrative experiments in electricity, magnetism and optics. Pre: PHYS 107 or PHYS 171 (either of which can be taken concurrently).

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Political Science (POLS)

POLS 325, Legal Geography, 3 credits
In this course, we will explore and examine a variety of places that upon first consideration, do not seem either legal or political. We will investigate a variety of types of places and spaces that carry legal and political weight in our everyday lives. Themes of consumption, expression, access, accommodation, culture, sex, race, living, national identity, community, discipline, and property will guide our inquiry into the relationship between law, politics, and spatial habitation. (Same as GEOG 325). (Attributes: GCC)
POLS 326, Juvenile Delinquency, 3 credits
Examination of the causes and control of juvenile delinquency. The major theories of juvenile delinquency will be reviewed. The course will also explore the organization and process of juvenile justice. Pre: SOC 100 or instructor's consent. (Same as SOC 326)
POLS 335, Environmental Politics & Policy, 3 credits
An examination of the major environmental and natural resource problems facing society today. Topics covered will include air and water pollution, energy development, and land use. (Formerly POLS 435)
POLS 342, International Law, 3 credits
Development, functions, and sources of public international law. Survey of major areas: law of the sea; laws of air and space; laws of warfare; pacific settlement of disputes; and rule-making in international organizations. Pre: POLS 242 or instructor's consent.
POLS 360, Public Administration, 3 credits
Public administration as a major component in the American political process and of public policy making and the crucial role administrators play in that process.

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Psychology (PSY)

PSY 100, Survey of Psychology, 3 credits
Principles of human behavior, individual differences, motivation, emotion, perception, learning. This introductory course provides a general survey of the entire field of psychology and serves as the prerequisite for all upper-division psychology courses.
PSY 213, Statistical Techniques, 4 credits
Frequency distributions; graphic methods; central tendency and variability; correlation and regression; inferential statistics; non-parametric statistics. Pre: two years of high school algebra or equivalent.
PSY 320, Developmental Psychology, 3 credits
Emotional, mental, physical, social development from infancy to adulthood; interest and abilities at different age levels. Pre: PSY 100.
PSY 321, Psychology of Personality, 3 credits
Scientific study of personality through examination of major theoretical approaches: personality functioning, development, and change; assessment and research strategies; empirical data on central concepts and social-cultural determinants. Pre: PSY 100.
PSY 322, Social Psychology, 3 credits
Interpersonal relations, social attitudes; group dynamics; intergroup relations, class and cultural influences. Pre: PSY 100.
PSY 323, Community Psychology, 3 credits
Community factors such as urbanization, social service programs, and schools as they affect the psychological well-being of individuals. Social system intervention techniques to better the fit between individuals and environments. Pre: PSY 100. (Attributes: GAHP, GCC, HPP)
PSY 324, Abnormal Psychology, 3 credits
Nature and causes of psychotic, neurotic, intellectual, and other psychological disorders. Definition, assessment, and diagnosis of abnormality. Psychotherapy, chemotherapy, and other treatment alternatives. Prevention, legal, and societal issues. Pre: PSY 100.
PSY 325, Psychology of Women, 3 credits
Issues and topics relevant to the psychological development and functioning of women including sex differences in abilities and behavior, achievement motivation, work, sexuality, pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood, mental health and domestic violence. Pre: PSY 100. (Same as WS 325)
PSY 350, Cognitive Psychology, 3 credits
Theories, assumptions, empirical findings, and applications of cognitive psychology. Topics include memory, inference, prediction, and mental imagery. Pre: PSY 214.
PSY 360, Cross-Cultural Psychology, 3 credits
Application of psychological methodology and theories to the study of behavior in selected cultures, with a focus on Polynesia. Topics to include child-rearing and socialization, cognition, personality, and social behavior patterns. Pre: PSY 100 and upper division standing. (Attributes: GAHP)
PSY 370, Sport Psychology, 3 credits
Survey of methods and findings in the application of psychological principles in sport. Topics include arousal and anxiety, cognitive processes, team performance, coaching behavior and techniques to maximize sports performance. Pre: PSY 100. (Same as KES 370).
PSY 377, Counseling Psychology, 3 credits
This course covers the various theoretical approaches to counseling, the therapeutic relationship, techniques of counseling, ethical issues, research, diagnosis and assessment, cross-cultural counseling, as well as career, family and couples, and group interventions. Pre: PSY 100.
PSY 440, History of Psychology, 3 credits
Historical origins and development of contemporary psychology. Pre: 12 semester hours in psychology.
PSY 451, Adult Behavior Therapy, 3 credits
Theory, research, and practice in cognitive behavior therapy applied to adult disorders and problems. Treatment applications of relaxation, exposure and prevention, desensitization, aversion therapy, biofeedback, self-control, imagery and cognitive strategies. Pre: PSY 324
PSY 471, Child Abuse and Neglect, 3 credits
A survey of topics related to physical, sexual and psychological child abuse and neglect, including: the prevalence and incidence of different forms of abuse and neglect, scientific theories and findings about the causes and consequences of abuse and neglect, forensic and clinical assessment of abuse and neglect, mandated reporting and other legal issues, and psychological interventions for abused and neglected children and their families. Pre: PSY 214 and PSY 320, or instructor's consent.
PSY 475, Asian American Psychology, 3 credits
The course examines the personality and mental health issues of Asian Americans. Special emphasis is given to how minority group status, adaptation processes and bicultural development influence various aspects of psychological functioning. Specific topics include stereotypes and racism acculturation and enculturation, cultural values and behavioral norms, family roles, ethnic identity, communication styles, gender and interracial relationships, academic and career achievement, stressors and social support systems, psychopathology and culturally competent mental health treatment. Pre: PSY 100 and either PSY 360 or consent of instructor. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)
PSY 611, Human Lifespan Development, 3 credits
Psychological, social, and physical development over the life span. Interaction among genetic make-up, human activity, and context in the process of development. Stages and mechanisms of development. Normative development and deviations from the norm. Theories of development. Research on developmental processes in various domains. Cross-cultural perspectives on human development. Current research issues.
PSY 612, Career Development, 3 credits
Work and work-related behavior over the life span. Relationships between life style and career development. Theories of vocational development. Career development of women and minorities. Occupational information and decision making. Impact of changing technology and job market. Application to career counseling with diverse populations.
PSY 694, Special Topic: Human Sexuality, 3 credits
This course will examine the scientific study of sexual behavior in both human and non-human animals from the perspectives of behavioral genetics, psychoneuroendocrinology, ethology, psychology, and neuroscience. Special emphasis will be placed on practical application in a counseling setting.

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Sociology (SOC)

SOC 100, Principles of Sociology, 3 credits
An introduction to the theories, scientific methods and empirical findings of contemporary sociology.
SOC 300, Family in World Perspective, 3 credits
A comparative analysis of family and marriage patterns, mate selection, parent-child interaction, divorce rates, socialization of gender roles, legal sanctions, trends in organization and function. Pre: SOC 100 or instructor's consent. (Same as WS 300).
SOC 320, Social Stratification, 3 credits
The causes and consequences of institutionalized social inequality. Pre: SOC 100 or instructor's consent. (Same as WS 321).
SOC 326, Juvenile Delinquency, 3 credits
Examination of the causes and control of juvenile delinquency. The major theories of juvenile delinquency will be reviewed. The course will also explore the organization and processes of juvenile justice. Pre: SOC 100 or consent of instructor. (Same as POLS 326)
SOC 328, Gender, Crime & Justice, 3 credits
This course will examine theoretical perspectives on gender, crime, and the criminal justice system. Students will analyze the intersecting roles played by gender, race, and class in criminal offending, victimization, and institutional responses. Additional topics may include masculinity and crime, women and punishment, female delinquency, gender violence, sex work, and the role of women in the criminal justice system. Pre: SOC 100 or WS 151 (Same as WS 328).
SOC 350, Global Sociology, 3 credits
Introduction and exploration into global social and economic processes and how they interact with local conditions in different regions of the globe.
SOC 360, Health Care Policy, 3 credits
Analyses of local, national and global economic, legal and social factors impacting health care policies. Discussion of relationship between emerging social issues/trends and health care disparities and capacities. Discussion of social justice, cultural competence, and equity in access and delivery of health care services. Opportunities are provided to participate in political processes impacting nursing and health care policy. (Same at NURS 360)
SOC 391, Internship, 3 credits
Application of knowledge and skills in a public, private, or government agency/setting. May be taken for at total of 12 credits, only six of which can apply to the Sociology major or three to the minor. Pre: instructors consent, pre-approved placement, statement of learning objectives, and completed internship contract. (Attributes: GCC)

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Tourism (TOUR)

TOUR 350, Intro to Sustainable Tourism, 3 credits
Management and marketing issues faced by communities, business and government in developing sustainable tourism. Product development, pricing, capacity management, promotion and distribution channels. The strategic planning approach is introduced and applied in hands-on casework. Special resources include guest speakers with working knowledge of sustainable tourism and field trips to on-island tourism sites. Pre: Junior standing and acceptance into the Professional Business Program.

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Women's Studies (WS)

WS 151, Intro to Gender and WomenÔÇÖs Studies, 3 credits
An interdisciplinary survey of gender issues in contemporary U.S. society. Introduces foundational concepts regarding social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexual orientation. Topics include history, religion, sexuality, body image, reproductive rights, family, work, and violence.
WS 204, Intro to Race/Gender Film Studies, 3 credits
This course will focus on how race and gender historically shape individual and cultural experiences in America, as expressed in film. Key works that offer portrayals by and about various groups (i.e. gays/lesbian, immigrants, indigenous communities, mixed-race populations, etc.) will be critically compared and examined. Students will also discuss and address evolving audience responses to these works. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as ENG 204)
WS 300, Family in World Perspective, 3 credits
A comparative analysis of family and marriage patterns, mate selection, parent-child interaction, divorce rates, socialization of gender roles, legal sanctions, trends in organization and function. Pre: SOC 100 or instructor's consent. (Same as SOC 300).
WS 304, Philosophy & Culture Diversity, 3 credits
Philosophical examination of the meaning of cultural diversity and pluralism for questions concerning community and knowledge from a variety of American and non-western cultures as well as their interactions with categories of identity, based upon nation, race, class, gender and sexuality. Addresses the interactions of the social experience of individuals based upon categories of identity and the emergence of forms of community and knowledge. A global or transnational section will be one component of the course. (Same as PHIL 304).
WS 316, Science, Technology & Society, 3 credits
Impact of science and technology on various philosophical issues. Through a variety of readings that exemplify the field's content, students will examine the social, political, aesthetic, ethical, economic, and environmental constructs that shape modern institutions in science and technology. (Same as PHIL 316)
WS 321, Social Stratification, 3 credits
The causes and consequences of institutionalized social inequality. Pre: SOC 100 or instructor's consent. (Same as SOC 320).
WS 325, Psychology of Women, 3 credits
Issues and topics relevant to the psychological development and functioning of women including sex differences in abilities and behavior, achievement motivation, work, sexuality, pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood, mental health and domestic violence. Pre: PSY 100. (Same as PSY 325)
WS 328, Gender, Crime, & Justice, 3 credits
This course will examine theoretical perspectives on gender, crime, and the criminal justice system. Students will analyze the intersecting roles played by gender, race, and class in criminal offending, victimization, and institutional responses. Additional topics may include masculinity and crime, women and punishment, female delinquency, gender violence, sex work, and the role of women in the criminal justice system. Pre: SOC 100 or WS 151 (Same as SOC 328).
WS 356, Language and Gender, 3 credits
Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: ENG 100/ESL 100 or ENG 100T/ESL 100T and LING 102, or consent of instructor. (Same as ENG 356, LING 356)