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Summer 2018 Course Descriptions

Descriptions for Summer 2018 Guaranteed Courses are listed below. A complete schedule with all classes and details will be posted on the class availability page in February.

Updated 11/20/2017

Course Descriptions by Subject


Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 205, Cultural Anthropology, 3 credits The course will provide you with a multicultural perspective on the world, and deepen your understanding from a global perspective by highlighting cultural and gender diversity, kinship patterns, and economic and political systems.

ANTH 347, Pidgins and Creoles, 3 credits A study of the world's pidgins and creoles; the origin and nature of pidgins and creoles; the relationship of Hawaiian Creole English to other Creoles in the world; the link between the developments of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING 102 or LING 121. (Same as ENG 347, LING 347) (Attributes: GAHP)

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Astronomy (ASTR)

ASTR 385, Software Systems for Astronomy, 3 credits The course provides basic instruction in the design and implementation of software for telescope control systems, instrument control systems (cameras and spectrographs); as well as the web-based tools used to plan observations. The course also covers the analysis and archiving of astronomical data. Students learn about existing software tools and packages, develop their own software tools, and analyze datasets from today's leading observatories. The course is open to both astronomy students with a strong interest in computer science, and to computer science students with a strong interest in astronomy. Pre: ASTR 110 or ASTR 180; CS 150 or instructor approval.

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Biology (BIOL)

BIOL 243, Human Anatomy & Physiology I, 3 credits Basic structure and function of human tissue and organ systems, including skeletal, integumentary, muscular, respiratory, circulatory, and immune systems.

BIOL 244, Human Anatomy & Physiology II, 3 credits Basic structure and function of human tissue and organ systems, including digestive, urinary, nervous, endocrine, and reproductive systems. Pre: BIOL 243 or equivalent, or instructor's consent.

BIOL 275, Fundamental Microbiology, 3 credits A survey or microbiology with emphasis on bacteria, viruses, infectious diseases and their control. Pre: one semester of college chemistry. Recommended: at least one semester of BIOL 101, BIOL 175 , or BIOL 176. (Attributes: ALEX, GCC)

BIOL 275L, Microbiology Lab, 1 credit A survey or microbiology with emphasis on bacteria, viruses, infectious diseases and their control. Pre: one semester of college chemistry. Recommended: at least one semester of BIOL 101, BIOL 175, or BIOL 176. (Attributes: ALEX, GCC)

BIOL 410, Biochemistry, 3 credits Basic compositions and functions of biological matter, metabolic interconversions and transformations; the bioenergetics involved and the levels of control over these processes. Pre: BIOL 270 and CHEM 242.

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Business (BUS)

BUS 100, Intro to Business, 3 credits A study of business functions, methods of business operation, types of business ownership, and the role of business organizations in contemporary society.

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Chemistry (CHEM)

CHEM 141, Survey of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, 3 credits Brief introduction to organic chemistry and selected topics in biochemistry.

CHEM 161, General Chemistry I, 3 credits A mathematically rigorous introduction to chemistry designed for majors in the natural sciences. Topics covered include measurement and problem solving, structure of atoms, molecules, and compounds; chemical equations, chemical quantities and aqueous reactions; behavior of gases; thermochemistry; quantum-mechanical model of the atom; periodic property of the elements; chemical bonding. Pre: Passing score on the chemistry placement exam. Previously Offered as CHEM 124

CHEM 161L, General Chemistry I Lab, 1 credit Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Pre: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 161 or prior credit for CHEM 161. Previously offered as CHEM 124L

CHEM 162, General Chemistry II, 3 credits A mathematically rigorous continuation of CHEM 161. Topics covered include liquids, solids and intermolecular forces; properties of solutions; chemical kinetics and equilibrium; acids and bases; aqueous ionic equilibrium; free energy and thermodynamics; electrochemistry. Pre: a grade of "C" (not "C-") or better in CHEM 161. Previously offered as CHEM 125

CHEM 162L, General Chemistry II Lab, 1 credit Experiments illustrating the fundamental principles and techniques of chemistry. Pre: concurrent enrollment in CHEM 162 or prior credit in CHEM 162. Previously offered as CHEM 125L

CHEM 241, Organic Chemistry I, 3 credits The study of carbon compounds. Topics include molecular structure, stereochemistry, molecular spectroscopy, reactions and methods of preparation of principal classes of organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms. Pre: CHEM 162 and CHEM 162L or instructor's consent.

CHEM 241L, Organic Chemistry I Lab, 1 credit Techniques of organic chemistry, including synthesis and qualitative analysis. Applications include spectroscopy and chromatography. Pre: CHEM 241 which may be taken concurrently.

CHEM 242, Organic Chemistry II, 3 credits The study of carbon compounds. Topics include molecular structure, stereochemistry, molecular spectroscopy, reactions and methods of preparation of principal classes of organic compounds. Reaction mechanisms. Pre: CHEM 241 and CHEM 241L or instructor's consent.

CHEM 242L, Organic Chemistry II Lab, 1 credit Techniques of organic chemistry, including synthesis and qualitative analysis. Applications include spectroscopy and chromatography. Pre: CHEM 242 which may be taken concurrently.

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Communication (COM)

COM 251, Public Speaking, 3 credits Analysis, preparation and delivery of speeches. Emphasis on content, organization and style.

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Economics (ECON)

ECON 340, Money & Banking, 3 credits Relation of monetary system to price level, employment and income; nature and functions of money and banking; role of money in international trade and inflation. Pre: ECON 131.

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English (ENG)

ENG 225, Writing for Science & Technology, 3 credits Working from logical and rhetorical principles, this course prepares students to write about science and technology in their academic disciplines and careers. Assignments include synthesis, process analysis, and argumentation. Intended for students majoring in the applied and natural sciences. Includes a formal research project and report. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.

ENG 345, Children & Literature, 3 credits Literature in English for and by children, with special emphasis on the ways in which literature promotes social, emotional, and intellectual development. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T or instructor's consent.

ENG 347, Pidgins and Creoles, 3 credits A study of the world's pidgins and creoles with special reference to the Pacific region; the origin and nature of pidgins and creoles; the relationship between Hawai Ľi Creole English to other Creoles in the world. The link between the development of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING¬†102 or LING 121. (Same as ANTH¬†347/LING¬†347) (Attributes: GAHP)

ENG 356, Language and Gender, 3 credits Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T and LING 102, or instructor's consent. (Same as LING 356/WS 356)

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History (HIST)

HIST 284, History of Hawaii, 3 credits A survey course in the history of the Hawaiian Islands from Polynesian origins to contemporary multi-cultural society. Traces the impact of major events and historical figures upon Hawaiian society and also considers the Hawaiian response to these changes. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)

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Kinesiology and Exercise Science (KES)

KES 310, Basic Motor Learning, 3 credits Basic understanding of the principles of motor learning and performance in a variety of contexts including teaching, coaching, design of performer-friendly equipment and work environments, and everyday motor skill learning.

KES 340, Science: Diet & Weight Control, 3 credits This course presents a basic understanding of the multiple factors involved with body weight control and health. This course centers on the important scientific factors of body weight control, including energy balance, basal metabolism, hunger versus appetite, nutritional function and needs, nature versus nurture of obesity, treatment of obesity, physical activity and its importance in weight control and maintenance. Eating disorders and medical interventions such as gastric bypass surgery will be presented.

KES 368, Sports and Exercise Nutrition, 3 credits This course will introduce the student to the importance of nutrition in the field of exercise sciences. The purpose of this course is to bridge between nutritional concepts and exercise concepts, and the practical applications. Pre: KES 207.

KES 370, Sport Psychology, 3 credits Survey of methods and findings in the application of psychological principles in sport. Topics include arousal and anxiety, cognitive processes, team performance, coaching behavior and techniques to maximize sports performance. (Same as PSY 370)

KES 440, Physiology of Aging, 3 credits Study of the physiological mechanisms and the effects of aging on the human systems including the cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, neurological, sensory, metabolic, and endocrinological. This course will present the topic of physiology of exercise and aging. Pre: BIOL 125.

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Linguistics (LING)

LING 102, Introduction to Linguistics, 3 credits A broad introduction to general linguistics: survey of phonology, morphological, syntactic, and semantic analysis, and historical and comparative linguistics. (Formerly LING/ ENG 203).

LING 347, Pidgins and Creoles, 3 credits A study of the world's pidgins and Creoles with special reference to the Pacific region; the origin and nature of pidgins and Creoles; the relationship of Hawaiian Creole English to other Creoles in the world; the link between the development of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING 102 or LING 121. (Same as ANTH 347 and ENG 347) (Attributes: GAHP)

LING 356, Language and Gender, 3 credits Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T and LING 102, or instructor's consent. (Same as ENG 356/WS 356)

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Marine Science (MARE)

MARE 140, Intro to Hawaiian Coral Reefs, 3 credits Explore the underwater world of the Big Island of Hawai Ľi while learning about unique marine ecosystems found nowhere else on Earth. Students will acquire an appreciation for local aquatic fauna in the classroom including the basics of marine biology and natural history. Pre: concurrent enrollment in MARE¬†140L required. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)

MARE 140L, Intro to Hawaiian Coral Reefs Lab, 1 credit Students will enter the natural laboratory that is Hawai Ľi and investigate coral reefs, coastal beaches and tide pool systems with mask, snorkel and fins. Learn to identify common marine inhabitants while enjoying an unparalleled educational experience under the sea. Concurrent enrollment in MARE¬†140 is required. (Attributes: GAHP, HPP)

MARE 264, QUEST, 3 credits The application of commonly utilized nearshore underwater ecological surveying techniques using SCUBA. Intensive two-week course combining lecture and field work. Data will be collected in the field, reduced, analyzed and presented in an oral report. Pre: Authorization as a scientific diver in training before start of course and instructor's consent.

MARE 364, Advanced QUEST, 3 credits Students lead a dive team learning underwater ecological surveying techniques; supervise field data collection, data reduction and analysis, and team presentation of written and oral reports; and assist in training students in identification of marine organisms. Pre: BIOL/MARE 264, authorization as a scientific diver in training before start of course, and instructor's consent. Student receives CR/NC for the course.

MARE 380, Natural History of Sharks and Rays, 3 credits This course will examine the natural history of the Elasmobranchs, an ancient group of fishes that have existed for almost 450 million years. Comprehensive investigations of sharks, rays, skates, sawfishes, and chimera, along with representative species from Hawai Ľi, will be conducted. Subjects will include evolution, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, ecology, conservation and management of these unique animals. Discussions of current research papers along with group research projects will be covered during lectures Pre: MARE¬†171 or instructor's consent.

MARE 380L, Natural History of Sharks Lab, 1 credit This course will further examine Elasmobranchs using a hands-on approach to compliment the work done in Lecture using both laboratory and field-based activities. Laboratory sessions will involve detailed dissections of shark, ray, skate, and chimera functional anatomy. Students will also participate in a tagging study of coastal shark species throughout the Big Island of Hawaii. Pre: Concurrent enrollment in MARE 380.

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Mathematics (MATH)

MATH 103, Intro to College Algebra, 3 credits For students who need to improve algebraic skills prior to taking Pre-calculus or Applied Calculus, or for courses in Introductory Chemistry, Physics or Statistics. Topics include exponents and radicals, factoring, systems of equations, linear equations, quadratic equations, general properties of functions, graphing, polynomial functions, exponential and logarithmic functions.

MATH 140X, Precalculus, 4 credits MATH 140X is an accelerated one semester course on the material covered in the sequence 135-140. Topics include the essential pre-calculus skils needed for success in calculus: functions, with special attention to polynomial, functions; plane trigonometry; and polar coordinates. Credit may not be earned for both MATH 140 and MATH 140X Pre: B+ or better in MATH 103, or C or better in MATH 135, or an appropriate recommendation on the Math Placement Test. (Previously offered as MATH 104)

MATH 206, Calculus II, 4 credits Second semester of a standard first year calculus sequence intended primarily for Natural Science majors. Topics include applications of the definite integral, techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and infinite series. Pre: C or better in MATH 205.

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Nursing (NURS)

NURS 348, Human Pathophysiology, 3 credits This course explores concepts of the biological basis for disease in adults and children. Alterations in normal body functions leading to disease and discomfort of the individual will be presented with an organized framework. Note: Restricted to Nursing and Pre-Nursing students only.

NURS 375, Applied Human Nutrition, 3 credits Applied nutrition in human health and disease, and the nurse's role in supporting nutritional care. Pre: one chemistry and one anatomy/physiology course, or consent of instructor. Note: Restricted to Pre-nursing and Nursing students only.

NURS 606, Rural Health Promotion, 3 credits Focus is on the responsiveness of organizational health services to health needs of populations, individuals, and families in rural communities. The impact of political, ecological, economic and cultural factors on community health in rural areas will be analyzed. Utilization of evidence-based processes and collaborative leadership in designing and structuring health promotion services to address rural community needs are emphasized.

NURS 606L, Rural Health Promotion Lab, 3 credits This is a supervised advanced practice practicum focusing on health promotion and clinical management of the health concerns of adult clients as commonly encountered in diverse and rural primary care settings. Emphasis will be placed on culturally appropriate evidence-based practice, consultation, research and evaluation. Three (3) semester hours of supervised practicum hours (135 clock hours) are required.

NURS 608L, Primary Care of Older Adults Lab, 3 credits This supervised advanced practice practicum focuses on promotion and clinical management of the health concerns of older adult clients as commonly encountered in diverse and rural primary care settings. Emphasis will be placed on culturally appropriate evidence-based practice, consultation, research and evaluation. Three (3) semesters of supervised practicum hours (135 clock hours) are required.

NURS 613, Program Develop/Evaluation, 3 credits This course builds on the synthesis of evidence-based know- ledge for a specific culturally diverse clinical target population/practice. Students will identify and propose appropriate strategies for organizational/practice program development and evaluation. An innovative policy action plan for a population of interest based on an understanding of the cultural, financial, legal, and human resource needs of the health care environment is developed.

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Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 316, Science, Technology & Values, 3 credits Impact of science and technology on various philosophical issues. Through a variety of readings that exemplify the field's content, students will examine the social, political, aesthetic, ethical, economic, and environmental constructs that shape modern institutions in science and technology. (Same as WS 316)

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Political Science (POLS)

POLS 335, Environmental Politics & Policy, 3 credits An examination of the major environmental and natural resource problems facing society today. Topics covered will include air and water pollution, energy development, and land use. (Formerly POLS 435)

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Psychology (PSY)

PSY 100, Survey of Psychology, 3 credits Principles of human behavior, individual differences, motivation, emotion, perception, learning. This introductory course provides a general survey of the entire field of psychology and serves as the prerequisite for all upper-division psychology courses.

PSY 213, Statistical Techniques, 4 credits Frequency distributions; graphic methods; central tendency and variability; correlation and regression; inferential statistics; non-parametric statistics. Pre: two years of high school algebra or equivalent.

PSY 320, Developmental Psychology, 3 credits Emotional, mental, physical, social development from infancy to adulthood; interest and abilities at different age levels. Pre: PSY 100.

PSY 321, Psychology of Personality, 3 credits Scientific study of personality through examination of major theoretical approaches: personality functioning, development, and change; assessment and research strategies; empirical data on central concepts and social-cultural determinants. Pre: PSY 100.

PSY 323, Community Psychology, 3 credits Community factors such as urbanization, social service programs, and schools as they affect the psychological well-being of individuals. Social system intervention techniques to better the fit between individuals and environments. Pre: PSY 100. (Attributes: ALEX, GAHP, GCC, HPP)

PSY 325, Psychology of Women, 3 credits Issues and topics relevant to the psychological development and functioning of women including sex differences in abilities and behavior, achievement motivation, work, sexuality, pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood, mental health and domestic violence. PSY 100. (Same as WS 325)

PSY 370, Sport Psychology, 3 credits Survey of methods and findings in the application of psychological principles in sport. Topics include arousal and anxiety, cognitive processes, team performance, coaching behavior and techniques to maximize sports performance. Pre: PSY 100. (Same as KES 370).

PSY 377, Counseling Psychology, 3 credits This course covers the various theoretical approaches to counseling, the therapeutic relationship, techniques of counseling, ethical issues, research, diagnosis and assessment, cross-cultural counseling, as well as career, family and couples, and group interventions. Pre: PSY 100.

PSY 601, Applied Multivariate Statistic, 4 credits Advanced statistical techniques used in psychological research and assessment. Strategies of multivariate data screening, transformation, analysis, and interpretation. Computerized statistical packages designed for multivariate analyses.

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Sociology (SOC)

SOC 100, Principles of Sociology, 3 credits An introduction to the theories, scientific methods and empirical findings of contemporary sociology.

SOC 326, Juvenile Delinquency, 3 credits Examination of the causes and control of juvenile delinquency. The major theories of juvenile delinquency will be reviewed. The course will also explore the organization and processes of juvenile justice. Pre: SOC 100 or consent of instructor. (Same as POLS 326)

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Women's Studies (WS)

WS 316, Science, Technology & Values, 3 credits Impact of science and technology on various philosophical issues. Through a variety of readings that exemplify the field's content, students will examine the social, political, aesthetic, ethical, economic, and environmental constructs that shape modern institutions in science and technology. (Same as PHIL 316)

WS 325, Psychology of Women, 3 credits Issues and topics relevant to the psychological development and functioning of women including sex differences in abilities and behavior, achievement motivation, work, sexuality, pregnancy, childbirth and motherhood, mental health and domestic violence. Pre: PSY 100. (Same as PSY 325)

WS 356, Language and Gender, 3 credits Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T and LING 102, or instructor's consent. (Same as ENG 356/LING 356)

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