Two UH Hilo students win awards at national biomedical research conference

A total of seven UH Hilo students were selected to present their research in biomedical or biobehavioral science as first authors. Kailee Yoshimura and Michelle Biete each won an award for their presentations.

Photos of the two winners inset on the conference poster.
Two UH Hilo students, Kailee Yoshimura and Michelle Biete, won awards at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students, a national conference held virtually this year Nov. 9-13. Click poster to enlarge.

Two students from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo won awards at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS), a national conference held online Nov. 9–13, 2020. A total of seven UH Hilo students from the  Students of Hawaiʻi Advanced Research Program (SHARP) were selected to present an e-poster and five-minute talk describing their research in biomedical or biobehavioral science as first authors.

SHARP students Kailee Yoshimura and Michelle Biete each won an award for their presentations. The recognition is prestigious in that ABRCMS is one of the largest professional conferences for underrepresented students. The four-day conference included over 2,000 virtual poster and oral presentations given by undergraduate and postbaccalaureate students.

Yoshimura won her award in the category of Physiology and Pharmacology of an Undergraduate Senior for her presentation on her research into “Development of Quercetin Containing Polymeric Nanoparticles for Oral Delivery.”

Biete won her award in the category of Computational and Systems Biology of an Undergraduate Junior for her presentation on her research into “A Pragmatic Approach to Standardizing Ultrastructure Morphology in Tissue and Cell Culture.”

Also presenting at the conference representing UH Hilo:

  • Taylor A.U. Barongan, “Synthetic Studies of Antitubercular Atrovimycin”
  • Kit Neikirk, “Increased Efficacy of Difluoromethylornithine and Metformin Containing Anionic Permeation Enhancers for the Treatment of Neuroblastoma”
  • Evangeline Lemieux, “COVID-19 and Student Life in Hawaiʻi: Challenges, Adjustments, and Adaptations”
  • Jace Taka, “Development of Resveratrol Containing Polymeric Nanoparticles for Oral Delivery”
  • Jane M.U. Walsh, “Traditional Preparations of ‘Awa (Piper methysticum) Address the Intersection of Mental and Cancer Health Disparities in Native Hawaiians”

SHARP

SHARP logoUH Hilo’s SHARP program is funded by the National Institutes of Health and led by Lynn Morrison (anthropology), Lisa Muehlstein (marine science), and Lenard Allen (coordinator). In addition to Morrison, SHARP student mentors from UH Hilo include Abhijit Date, Ingo Koʻomoa-Lange, Dana-Lynn Koʻomoa-Lange, and Dianqing Sun (all from pharmaceutical sciences), and Misty Pacheco (kinesiology and exercise sciences). Also part of the program is Antentor O. Hinton, Jr., a summer research mentor from the University of Iowa.

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