University Radio Hilo is now on the air at FM101.1

Organizers hope to use the FM radio station to help strengthen the connection between UH Hilo and the community-at-large, all while giving students a chance to learn about the broadcasting industry.

By Susan Enright.

Group of University Radio Hilo spring 2015 staff and DJs stand for photo. They all wear black t-shirts with DJ logo.
University Radio Hilo spring 2015 staff and DJs stand for a photo at the UH Hilo Campus Center. Courtesy photo.

University Radio Hilo or URH is now on the air at FM 101.1.

“It took many years to get our FM license, then it’s taken time to get all the equipment, then to get it all connected, but it’s been a great learning experience and leadership journey for our students,” says Ellen Kusano, director of the Campus Center at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. She says the station broadcast should have a five-mile range from campus.

Kusano gives credit for the achievement to Kyle Douglas, URH radio engineer; Jake Galves, URH advisor; Sky Flores, executive chair of the 2014-15 Board of Media Broadcasting (BoMB); Theo Oneal, general manager of URH in 2014-15; Matt Groulx, executive chair of BoMB in 2015-16; and Brenda Burch, general manager of URH in 2015-16. Kusano also includes a shout out to the URH staff, the DJs and all the volunteers who helped the team reach the FM goal.

Douglas says the station is currently in a testing phase for the low power FM system. “We have gotten reports that our signal has been caught well beyond our initial estimates and right now we are broadcasting at 30 percent power of what our license will allow us,” he says.

Douglas worked on the FCC application, the determination on equipment, and did most of the work with campus electricians to hook up everything. He was station manager last year. He says the project has been on-going for many years and finally having a FM signal will help the community know that the university does indeed have a radio station.

“We are hoping to use it as a tool to help strengthen the connection between the university with the community-at-large, all while giving students a chance to learn about the broadcasting industry,” he explains.

Douglas says a program schedule will be drawn up “when the bulk of our DJs return this fall.”

Related: See Hawaii Tribune Herald, June 4, 2015: Making airwaves and history.

 

About the writer of this story: Susan Enright is a public information specialist for the Office of the Chancellor and editor of UH Hilo Stories. She received her bachelor of arts in English and certificate in women’s studies from UH Hilo.

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