CoBE student interns at high-profile business-news startup Morning Brew

Thursday, February 25, 2021, 12:01am by

Amidst the dire stories of media’s decline, business news startup Morning Brew is a rare success story.  Its daily newsletter, serving bite-sized business news, has a growing subscriber base and is making a profit.

CoBE student Mika Odaira started as a Morning Brew subscriber.  From reading the newsletter, she learned a lot about business news that she didn’t catch on TV or online. She was so impressed with the publication that she decided to apply for an internship. And she got it!

 

Ms. Odaira quickly found that in this fast-paced startup environment it was up to her to produce results, with very little hand-holding.

“At first I was a bit put off by this and I thought the experience wouldn’t amount to much,” she says. “But I realized that this is probably what work will be like once I graduate. No one will hold my hand and point me to the next step. It’s up to me to take initiative and market myself well.”

In CoBE we encourage and support internships for students who want them. They’re a great way to gain experience and forge a pathway to a job after graduation.  And not all internships are the same.

“Internships can come in all types from instruction-heavy ones to more open ended ones like this,” Ms. Odaira says. “My advice for my peers is to be ready for many types of work environments. For those like myself who are more introverted and find it hard to take initiative, try to keep in mind that as uncomfortable as some of these experiences may be, the personal growth we gain through this is key to success.”

QR Code

Interested in subscribing? Scan the QR code above or visit https://brew-u.com/uhawaii

CoBE Econ Professor Keisuke Nakao Honored for Research on Two-Front War

Monday, February 15, 2021, 2:28am by

Dr. Keisuke Nakao, Associate Professor of Economics, was selected to receive the 4th Walter Isard Annual Award for the year 2020’s best article in Peace Economics Peace Science and Public Policy (PEPS). PEPS is a scholarly journal whose aim is promoting and disseminating the study of peace economics. Walter Isard, after whom the award is named, was the journal’s founder. The journal’s editor-in-chief and associate editors voted unanimously to award best paper status to Dr. Nakao’s  “Rationalist Explanations for Two-Front War,” describing it as “brilliant theoretical work.”

Advancing our understanding of conflict among three or more states

While theorists in International Relations have developed a number of models of war fought between two states, they have devoted much less efforts to modeling war among three or more states presumably because of difficulties with modeling multilateral interactions. By focusing on a particular form of war—two-front war—where a state at the center is fought by two enemies at opposing peripheries, the article addresses why war can break out in one front and then spread to the other. Because a war in one front can affect the war outcome in the other through the shift of military balance, a peripheral state may preventively join the war ongoing in the other front to leverage its power (e.g., Napoleonic Wars), or the central state may preemptively initiate war in one front to establish its preponderance in the other (e.g., World War I). These findings echo the concern that a multi-polar system may not be so stable as the bipolar system that existing models of war commonly presume.

Economics is about more than just supply and demand curves

Dr. Nakao’s research illustrates the expansive reach of the economics field. Economics principles can be applied to business, government, education, international aid, and personal finance, among other things.

Economics, at its very heart, is the study of people. It seeks to explain what drives human behaviour, decisions and reactions when faced with difficulties or successes. ~ Dr. Yu-Hsiang Lei, London School of Economics

The College of Business and Economics offers a BBA with a concentration in Applied Economics, a minor in Economics, and  Economics courses a la carte. In the fall of 2021, in addition to introductory and intermediate microeconomics and macroeconomics, we will offer ECON 430 Quantitative Forecasting, and ECON 482 Natural Resource Environmental Economics.

About Dr. Nakao

Dr. Keisuke Nakao is Associate Professor of Economics in the College of Business and Economics. He received his Ph.D. in Economics with an emphasis on Game Theory and Political Economy from Boston University. His research interests center on Positive Theory of International Politics. Dr. Nakao has published in such outlets as Journal of Peace Research; Journal of Theoretical Politics; Economics & Politics; B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy; Defence & Peace Economics; Peace Economics, Peace Science, & Public Policy; Review of Law & Economics; Economics Bulletin; Economics of Peace & Security Journal; and Asian Journal of Law & Economics. He is currently working on game-theoretic analyses of armed conflict.

Free UH Hilo online application workshop February 3 – $50 fee waived for Hawaiʻi residents

Wednesday, January 27, 2021, 5:45am by

To reach out to resident students during the pandemic, UH Hilo will host a virtual application workshop. This event is for all Hawaiʻi residents interested in applying for admission to UH Hilo for the Fall 2021 semester. The $50 application fee will be waived for applications submitted during the virtual workshop. This event is for undergraduate programs only.  This site has more info on graduate programs.

Date: Wednesday, February 3, 2021
Time1:30 pm – 4:30 pm

Registration: http://go.hawaii.edu/9AJ

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo enrolls around 3,000 students and is the only four-year campus on the Big Island. It is a Minority Serving Institution, ranked by U.S. News & World Report as the most ethnically diverse campus among national universities.

UH Hilo’s College of Business and Economics offers one of only two AACSB-accredited business administration degree programs in the State of Hawaiʻi. The high quality of the program that this accreditation ensures, coupled with our small class sizes and personal attention to students, makes the B.B.A. program at UH Hilo a great choice for quality business education. We offer a BBA in Accounting, and a BBA in General Business with concentrations in Applied Economics, Finance, Health Care Management, Management, Marketing, Professional Studies, and starting in fall 2021, Agri-Business.

New study: Two heads are not better than one when it comes to preventing fraud

Monday, November 23, 2020, 12:20am by

Separation of Duties has long been thought to be the most effective control to prevent fraud and errors. It turns out that Separation of Duties IS very effective for preventing errors. But, when you want to prevent your employees from stealing from your company, it doesn’t work well at all. According to new research by Emerita Professor of Accounting Bobbi Barra and colleagues, “Separation of Duties” doesn’t necessarily reduce fraud. In practice, the possibility of collusion pretty much wipes out any advantage of separation of duties. The researchers suspect that people are not afraid of pointing out others’ mistakes, but shy away from pointing out theft and other crimes. No one likes a tattler, after all.

How it all started

The idea came up when Roberta noticed there was no research into fraud controls; only conjecture by well meaning auditors. The authors set out to discover if the conjectures surrounding the most common control, separation of duties, was correct. The analysis presented here is theory that now should be tested empirically. After revisions and strenuous peer review the paper was accepted for publication in the Journal of Forensic Accounting Research (JFAR). JFAR is the premier accounting journal in the United States for research on fraud topics.

What does this mean for your business?

Reliance on Separation of Duties may give you a false sense of security when it comes to fraud. It might be wise to invest in other fraud controls such as a tip hotline, something which the Association of Fraud Examiners has shown to be the most common way fraud is discovered.

About the Authors

Roberta Barra, CPA, PhD., is a retired Professor of Accounting from the University of Hawai’i at Hilo. She has had many years of teaching and research experience in auditing, systems and software consulting involving accounting and ERP software. Her research focused on accounting information systems including internal controls, accounting software evaluations and documentation techniques. Her secondary interests include international accounting and audit-related research. She has presented her research at conference proceedings nationally and internationally. She earned an MBA from the University of Houston and a PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Arline Savage is Professor of Accounting and former Department Chair for Accounting and Finance in the Collat School of Business at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. As a Chartered Accountant, she has worked in industry, the accounting profession and as a consultant. As a professor, she has taught a wide variety of courses at universities in South Africa, Canada and the United States. Arline has been a Deloitte Faculty Fellow, received the Ernst & Young Leader in Ethics Award, the Fluor Corporation Excellence in Teaching Award, the Ernst & Young Outstanding Educator Award and the Loudell Teaching Award. Arline serves on the editorial boards of the two highest ranked accounting education journals, Issues in Accounting Education and the Journal of Accounting Education. She is also a member of the editorial board of the International Journal of Business Information Systems. Arline has over 40 academic and professional publications to her credit, as well as two scholarly books and two textbooks. Among her academic research honors in the United States are six best conference paper awards. In the United States, she has consulted for private equity investors on various accounting and finance projects in the wholesale food, apparel, engineering, and manufacturing industries, and has served as accounting advisor to the chairman of an audit committee of a public company. She also served as interim CFO for an engineering company in California during the post-acquisition phase and has performed business valuations for acquisition and accounting purposes.

Eric Im, professor of economics, joined the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo faculty in 1983. His first and foremost interest was in quantitative economics. His substantial research output covered a wide range of topics in both theory and application: econometric theory, matrix theory, international finance, education, natural resources, taxation, tourism, transportation, and transnational terrorism. Professor Im passed away in 2017.

Roberta A Barra, Arline Savage, Eric Im; Mathematical Formulation of the Effectiveness of ‘Separation of Duties’ as a Preventive Control Activity. Journal of Forensic Accounting Research doi: https://doi.org/10.2308/JFAR-19-012 

File under Business Majors can do Anything: CoBE accounting alumna enrolls in top medical school

Thursday, October 29, 2020, 12:12am by

Raisa Ancheta (formerly Raisa Evora) earned her BBA from CoBE and started as a Senior Accountant at a brokerage firm in the Bay Area. Then she completed a second Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh in 2018 with a 4.0 (Summa Cum Laude).

Now she is headed to the UC Irvine School of Medicine, a top-50 medical school that accepts under 2% of applicants each year.

How did she move from accounting to medical school? A long commute, an unexpected move, and a lifelong interest in science:

I was fortunate to work in one of the greatest work environments as a senior accountant. However, I found myself constantly reading science textbooks on my commute to work. I, unfortunately, had to leave my job in the Bay Area when my husband was deployed and stationed in Wisconsin. I took advantage of my new freedom during this time of transition to pursue a passion for science that I had developed. Furthermore, I realized that I could not only have tremendous fun working in a field that I love, but I also had the advantage of understanding the management/accounting/marketing related aspects of business which is an integral part of the health care system.

Her business background and her experience at CoBE made her uniquely prepared for her studies in life sciences and medicine.

I do not think I could have succeeded this way had it not been for the strong foundation I received at University of Hawaii at Hilo. All my professors and mentors at UHH were beyond kind and encouraging. They offered me so many opportunities to shine academically and made me feel like I could succeed in anything I set my mind towards.

Raisa notes that the support of her family has been central to her success.

I am also grateful for the support of all my family on the Big Island of Hawai’i. My mother, Sunday Leimomi Nelson, M.Ed, has been an especially empowering influence on my decision to become a medical student. She advocated for children and families of East Hawai’i in the pursuit of mental health parity. Now, in the dissertation phase of her Doctorate of Education in Organizational Leadership with a focus on Mental Health, she demonstrates a life-long love of learning at any age. Her commitment to learning and the support I had from the UHH faculty inspired me to combine my business background, my love of science, and my desire to help others into a career in medicine.

Raisa lives in California with her husband, two daughters, and two sons.

Thropp scholarship assists as Covid hits

Saturday, August 1, 2020, 6:19pm by

Last year, the College of Business & Economics received a scholarship endowment from the estate of James P.D. Thropp, Jr.

(more…)

Certificates in Business, IT, and Finance sought as pandemic disrupts careers

Thursday, June 25, 2020, 7:25am by

Strada Education reports that over half of Americans are concerned about job security in the wake of the pandemic, and many of those believe a career change would require more education. Career-changers prefer certificates over 4-year degrees.

Potential career-switchers prefer non-degree programs

Source: Strada Education

The most popular fields to switch into are Business, Information Technology, and Finance.

18% want to switch to business; 14% to IT; and 9% to finance.

Source: Strada Education

The  University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo offers non-degree certificates in  AccountingBusiness AdministrationData Science,  Finance, and Health Care Administration.  Apply here to enroll in a non-degree certificate; no application fee is required.

The College of Business and Economics also offers executive education and proctoring of professional exams. Contact cobeuhh@hawaii.edu for more information.

CoBE coffee simulation featured in national teaching journal

Thursday, June 18, 2020, 6:05am by

From Farm to Cup: A Coffee Supply Chain Negotiation Role-Play

A study of Dr. Todd Inouye‘s coffee supply chain simulation is coming out in July in the teaching journal for DSI (Decision Sciences Institute), DSJIE (Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education). This article and class activity was presented at both the Academy of International Business Conference as a finalist for the CUIBE Award for Best Paper on International Business Education and again at the DSI annual conference as a finalist for the Instructional Innovation Award.

How it all started

Dr. James Kling, who specializes in supply chain management at Niagara University, approached Dr. Inouye one day with a problem. Current supply chain simulations were dated and boring, and failed to provide a high standard of experiential learning. Dr. Inouye and Dr. Kling developed this simulation from the ground up. It has been run in multiple MBA and undergraduate classes at Niagara University and in the fall 2019 and spring 2020 semesters at UH Hilo in CoBE’s required MGT 333 – International Management course. Students get to experience different parts of the coffee supply chain in a pricing negotiation which also folds in the ethical dilemmas businesses face as they push to lower costs.

The results

Dr. Inouye and Dr. Kling have found that students who complete the activity significantly improve their ethical awareness and scope of responsibility while feeling more confident in negotiating.
From Farm to Cup: A Coffee Supply Chain Negotiation Role-Play
Todd M. Inouye and James A. Kling. Forthcoming in Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, a publication of the Decision Sciences Institute. 

College of Business and Economics Announces 2020 Beta Gamma Sigma Inductees

Wednesday, June 3, 2020, 3:44am by

 

Beta Gamma Sigma, the premier business honor society, has inducted six  students from the College of Business and Economics. Membership in BGS is among the highest honors a student in a school of business can achieve.

CoBE faculty have a tradition of individually sponsoring students and covering students’ one-time membership and initiation costs.

Our 2020 Beta Gamma Sigma inductees are

 


Founded in 1913, Beta Gamma Sigma honors top performing students from business schools accredited by The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB). BGS is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies (ACHS).

CoBE Students awarded Certified Management Accountant scholarships

Monday, June 1, 2020, 5:36am by

Congratulations to CoBE accounting students Karen Basham, Jillian De Coite, Noel Jacob, Hana Jung-Okuda, Michelle Morris, Amber Nagata, and Aron Risley.

These students are recipients of CMA (Certified Management Accountant) scholarships from the Institute of Management Accountants. The CMA is one of the most respected accounting certifications in the profession.

Our students will have up to three years to complete all parts of the CMA exam for free. They will also have 2 -year free access to the online test bank materials to study for the exam.