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Tag: Workforce Development

Chancellor forms advisory council; first meeting held

Chancellor’s Leadership and Development Council will assist the chancellor on campus strategy and resource development.

Chancellor Straney gives his remarks at the first meeting of the Chancellor’s Leadership and Development Council held Thursday.
The Chancellor’s newly formed Leadership and Development Council is made up of community and business leaders.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney’s newly formed advisory council met for the first time yesterday.

“I am putting together a UH Hilo Chancellor’s Leadership and Development Council to assist me on campus strategy and resource development,” says the chancellor.

The council, made up of over 30 community and business leaders, will meet twice a year. They are charged to become informed advocates for the campus; support the educational and outreach mission of UH Hilo; enhance the lines of communication between the campus and various external constituencies; and provide advice and counsel. Participation in the council will be for a two-year period.

The first meeting of the council was held on Nov. 1 at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center. The chancellor gave a presentation covering a general overview of the campus.  PBR Hawaii & Associates, Inc., and Design Partners, Inc. gave a presentation on UH Hilo’s Long Range Development Plan. The council also looked at the requirements needed for Hilo to become a true “university town.”

“The input that the council and other community leaders can provide will be critical to our future,” says Chancellor Straney.

Attendees included:

  • Jimmy Arakaki, Dodo Mortuary Life Plan
  • Dorothy Kuʻulei Badua, Queen Liliʻuokalani Children’s Center-Honokaʻa
  • Debbie Baker, Current Events-Kona
  • Roberta Chu, Bank of Hawaiʻi
  • Romel Dela Cruz, Retired Public Administrator
  • Chuck Erskine, First Hawaiian Bank
  • David Fuertes, Ka Hana Noʻeau Partners in Development Foundation
  • Mike Fujimoto, HPM
  • Clyde Hayashi, Hawaiʻi Laborers-Employers Cooperation & Education Trust
  • Amy Hennessey, Ulupono
  • Robert Iopa, WCIT Architecture
  • Noelani Kalipi, Ti Leaf Group, Inc.
  • Herring Kalua, State Department of Transportation
  • Maurice Kaya, Pacific International Center for High Technology Research
  • Darren Kimura, Sopogy (on phone conference)
  • Kelcy Koga, Waiākea High School
  • Barry Mark, Ameriprise Financial
  • Darlene Martin, Kamehameha Schools Keauhou-Kahaluʻu Education Group
  • Marvin Min, Gas CO-Hilo
  • Hugh Ono, SSFM International, Inc.
  • Kathy Romero, Keonepoko Elementary School
  • Gladys Sonomura, Retired Sonomura Contracting/Community Volunteer
  • Barry Taniguchi, KTA Super Stores
  • Guy Toyama, H2 Technologies
  • Julie Tulang, Retired Non-Profit/Public Administrator
  • Steve Ueda, Suisan
  • Lehua Veincent, Kamehameha Schools-Hawaiʻi Campus
  • Bill Walter, W.H. Shipman, Ltd.
  • Linda West, Clark Realty
  • Ike Yoshina, Retired Public Administrator

View Chancellor Straney’s presentation: Resource Development and Campus Strategy (PDF)

Photos courtesy of the Office of Development.

Column by the Chancellor in UH Hilo’s Newsletter: Ka Lono Hanakahi, Sept. 2012

Message from University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Chancellor Donald O. Straney
Ka Lono Hanakahi, UH Hilo’s Faculty and Staff Newsletter
September 2012

College of Business and Economics earns high marks in national assessment

Welcome to our new academic year at UH Hilo. The beginning of the school year offers an exciting beginning for all of us.

I am delighted to share with you some great news from UH Hilo’s College of Business and Economics. CoBE and the students in the college recently received high scores from the nationwide Collegiate Learning Assessment. The CLA is a national instrument that evaluates students’ written responses to assess critical thinking, reasoning, problem solving skills, and their ability to communicate clearly and cogently.

Our student achievements were significantly above the national mean. Thirty-three graduating seniors enrolled in the capstone strategic planning course attained an average overall CLA score of 1,189, which puts our seniors in the 57thpercentile of graduating seniors nationwide. Better still, the CoBE’s Value-Added Score among the hundreds of institutions that administer the CLA is at the 93rd percentile nationwide!

Faculty at the college attribute this positive outcome to several factors: high quality faculty with terminal degrees who teach and are also active researchers devoted to student learning; small class sizes that allow personal attention and high levels of interaction; a strong culture of professionalism at the college; and applied learning activities such as internships, consulting for local businesses, and case and business plan competitions.

Our graduates who participated in the CLA are pleased, but not surprised, by the results. Winona Chen (2012) remarks that our “professors have passion for what they teach, they are invested in our success as students and professionals, and they invite us to reach our full potential.” Chen is currently interning in an Executive Team Leader position teaching fitness classes and running triathlons.

Shaun McKim (2012), a double major in economics and political science, currently enrolled in Clark University’s MBA program on a merit scholarship and says the “rigorous curriculum” and the opportunity to collaborate with professors and present papers at international conferences prepared him for the challenges of graduate school.

Emily Anderson (2012), an accounting graduate, says the courses are designed to emulate what students will encounter in the real work force. “I will be the first to attest to how much employers notice those things,” she says. “I am so lucky to have the fortunate problem this summer of having to turn down job offers because I was receiving too many.”

We are proud of our students and their performance on the CLA. This is confirmation of their critical thinking, analytical, and communication abilities. These results confirm that we offer a high-quality education and are preparing our graduates well for employment and advanced studies.

Aloha,
Don Straney

Column by the Chancellor in Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce Newsletter: Sept. 2012

Message from UH Hilo Chancellor Donald O. Straney
Chamber Connection Newsletter
Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce

September 2012

UH Hilo’s College of Business and Economics earns high marks in national assessment

We start the new school year with great news from the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s College of Business and Economics. CoBE and the students in the college recently received scores from the nationwide Collegiate Learning Assessment. The CLA is a national instrument that evaluates students’ written responses to assess critical thinking, reasoning, problem solving skills, and the ability to communicate clearly and cogently.

Our student achievements were significantly above the average mean. Thirty-three graduating seniors enrolled in the capstone strategic planning course attained an average overall CLA score of 1,189, which puts our seniors in the 57th percentile of graduating seniors nationwide. Better still, the college’s Value-Added Score among the hundreds of institutions that administer the CLA is at the 93rd percentile nationwide!

Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa’s book, Academically Adrift, examined college students’ growth in critical thinking skills as measured by the CLA. They find that “at least 45 percent of students in our [national] sample did not demonstrate any statistically significant improvement in Collegiate Learning Assessment performance during the first two years of college.”

Business is one of the lowest performing majors on the CLA, while students majoring in natural sciences earn the top scores. In a New York Times editorial, Arum writes, “students concentrating in business related coursework were the least likely to report spending time studying and preparing for class. Given such modest investments in academic activities, it is not surprising that business students show the lowest gains on measures of critical thinking, complex reasoning and written communication.”

Faculty at UH Hilo’s business college attribute our students positive outcome to several factors: high quality faculty with terminal degrees who teach and are also active researchers devoted to student learning; small class sizes that allow personal attention and high levels of interaction; a strong culture of professionalism at the college; and applied learning activities such as internships.

Our graduates who participated in the CLA are pleased, but not surprised, by the results. Winona Chen (2012) remarks that our “professors have passion for what they teach, they are invested in our success as students and professionals, and they invite us to reach our full potential.” Chen is currently interning in an Executive Team Leader position teaching fitness classes and running triathlons.

Shaun McKim (2012), a double major in economics and political science currently enrolled in Clark University’s MBA program on a merit scholarship, says the “rigorous curriculum” and the opportunity to collaborate with professors and present papers at international conferences prepared him for the challenges of graduate school.

Emily Anderson (2012), an accounting graduate, says the courses are designed to emulate what students will encounter in the real work force. “I will be the first to attest to how much employers notice those things,” she says. “I am so lucky to have the fortunate problem this summer of having to turn down job offers because I was receiving too many.”

We are proud of our students and their performance on the CLA. This is confirmation of their critical thinking, analytical, and communication abilities. These results confirm that we offer a high-quality education and are preparing our graduates well for employment and advanced studies.

For more news from the Office of the Chancellor, visit my blog.

Aloha,
Don Straney

Video: UH Innovation Initiative discussed

Click above to watch video at olelo.com.

The University of Hawai‘i at Hilo will have an important role in a new statewide economic development initiative headed by UH President M.R.C. Greenwood.

Kelli Abe Trifonovitch, director of communications and outreach for the UH Innovation Initiative, recently moderated a discussion on UH’s role in Hawai‘i’s economic development with Peter Quigley, UH vice president for community colleges, Jeanne Unemori Skog, Maui Economic Development, and Mitch D’Olier, president and CEO of Kaneohe Ranch on O‘ahu.

“In this program we’ll be talking about econmic development with focus on UH’s Innovation Initiative,” says Trifonovitch. “Economic development is a critically important topic and the University of Hawai‘i may have found the way forward for the diversification problem that has vexed our state for decades.”

UH Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney encourages everyone interested in learning more about the UH Innovation Initiative to watch the video, which includes discussion about the important role of UH Hilo in future economic growth of the state.

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Learn more about UH’s Innovation Initiative.  

Chancellor Straney gives talk on UH Hilo’s impact on the local economy

Chuck Erskine (left), vice president of Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce and chair of the Economic Development Committee introduced Chancellor Straney. Mr. Erskine is assistant vice president and area manager for the Waimea Branch of First Hawaiian Bank.

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Chancellor Donald Straney gave a presentation today to local business leaders on UH Hilo’s impact on the economic life of Hawai‘i island. The luncheon event, held at Restaurant Encore in Hilo, was sponsored by the Economic Development Committees of the Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce and the Japanese Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Hawai‘i.

Local business leaders listen to Chancellor Straney’s presentation.

Chancellor Straney’s talk, entitled, “Toward a Vibrant Economy for 21st Century Hawaii,” focused on UH Hilo’s role in the Hawai‘i island economy as a thriving enterprise creating thousands of jobs, generating millions in revenues, and developing educational and outreach programs in answer to island and state needs.

“We’re an island that has some special economic needs that universities and community colleges are supposed to help address,” says Chancellor Straney. “The need for post secondary education is strong, both in preparation for people to enter the workforce, and preparation for people to create and develop careers. Hawai‘i Community College and UH Hilo are poised to serve the county extremely well.”

View PowerPoint.