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Tag: Workforce Development

Chancellor Irwin featured in Midweek Hawai‘i Island: A Venue For Collegiate Success

Chancellor Bonnie D. Irwin is featured in Midweek Hawai‘i Island this week.

Excerpt:

When University of Hawai‘i at Hilo students returned to campus last week, there was a new face waiting to greet them. Bonnie Irwin, who began her tenure as the university’s chancellor on July 1, has big plans for the small-town university.

“I have spent most of my life in smaller communities,” says Irwin, who previously was provost and vice president for academic affairs at California State University, Monterey Bay.

“While I have a lot to learn about the diverse cultures that make up Hilo and Hawai‘i Island, I know a lot about small towns and small campuses. Relationships matter. I am committed to transparency in the way we operate, consultation with faculty and staff about how we do what we do, and empowering others to grow and become leaders themselves.”

Regional universities in small communities have a greater impact on the local area than the bigger research universities, says Irwin, who has more than 30 years of experience in higher education, including positions at University of California, Berkeley, and Eastern Illinois University. Irwin continues to seek out opportunities in places where she feels she can make the greatest difference.

Read full article at Midweek Hawai‘i Island.

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Chancellor’s Monthly Column, Sept. 2019: The magic of higher education

The magic of higher education: When we are successful at it, we open the door to opportunity for individuals, families, and communities.

By Bonnie D. Irwin

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie D. Irwin

The opening week of the fall semester is here! It’s second only to commencement week in its level of activity, enthusiasm, and hope for the future. Students are arriving to the campus of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo from across the state, nation, and the world as well as from down the street. UH Hilo rightly prides itself on the wide diversity of ethnic and cultural origins of our students. Indeed, The Chronicle of Higher Education ranked us last year as the most diverse public four-year university in the country.

Yet there is still one over-arching thing all these students have in common: the desire to better themselves and to provide a bright future for themselves and their families. And that is the magic of higher education when we are successful at it; we open the door to opportunity for individuals, families, and communities.

The UH Hilo Student Success Leadership Team has been hard at work both on recruiting students and keeping them here. We have bold goals for student success, and I am pleased to see so many good initiatives underway. We are continuing to work on pathways for students from UH community colleges into UH Hilo baccalaureate programs. We are creating more organized and intentional opportunities for community service and community-based research projects for our students. We are trying to expand employment opportunities for students on campus, so they can hone their job skills and build their resumés while helping their peers succeed.

Our new students were so excited to participate in First-Year Experience activities during Orientation last month. The campus community welcomed our newest Vulcans warmly with four days of activities—workshops, fairs, tours, shuttles, various socials, and a beautiful convocation ceremony—introducing them to our university and our community. The enthusiasm was palpable and I was honored to participate. Students are excited to be in college, excited to be at UH Hilo, and of course, a bit anxious about life at the university and how it might differ from the high school or community college they have come from.

We are also focusing on activities for continuing students: research experiences, internships, community service, study abroad. All of these provide valuable opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in class to real world situations. One of my goals for UH Hilo is to provide more of these opportunities for more students, so that they are competitive for good jobs and good graduate schools. At UH Hilo, they get the one-on-one attention that really enhances their learning, something larger schools cannot compete with.

Woven into all of this activity is a feeling of ‘ohana; our campus is relationship driven. We create lasting bonds and friendships among our students and between our students and members of the entire campus community, including faculty and staff, relationships that take them forward into life with the full support they need to succeed.

Thank you all for your support of our students! I am looking forward to the coming year.

Aloha,

Bonnie D. Irwin

 

Photo: New Vulcans on the Campus Center Plaza for the start of UH Hilo Student Orientation activities on Wednesday, Aug. 21. Nyssa Kushi, University Relations.

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Chancellor Bonnie Irwin’s first monthly column, July 2019: UH Hilo as a gateway for upward mobility

It is the university’s responsibility to take the lead in stewardship of regional economics, education, and improving the quality of life for all our island citizens and their communities.

By Bonnie D. Irwin

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie D. Irwin

As I begin my tenure as chancellor at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, I find a campus community hard at work preparing to develop a new strategic plan. Through a series of over 40 discussions that began last fall with faculty, staff, students and the local community, information is being gleaned and groundwork laid to produce a collaborative plan to achieve the highest of aspirations.

My favorite definition of leadership is that it is a process of moving an organization from its current reality to its aspirations. My first task at UH Hilo is to listen and learn what the campus and community aspirations are and then focus our energy toward achieving them, all the while making sure we are ambitious enough in those aspirations to really help the island with its needs—economic, educational, and cultural—while also protecting the ‘āina through sustainable activities.

I take this responsibility to heart. I strongly believe in the concept of regional stewardship for comprehensive universities: i.e., that a primary mission of our campus is to lift up the region, in this case Hawai‘i Island. One of the reasons I wanted to come to UH Hilo is because of our unique cultural emphasis in programs and curriculum, notably the acclaimed work being done to revitalize Native Hawaiian language and culture for the benefit of not only Hawai‘i’s indigenous people but also everyone in the state. The future of our university and our local community are inextricably linked.

Let me share some thoughts about where my attention is already focused.

I envision UH Hilo as a gateway for upward mobility. This means educating and preparing our students for meaningful employment that not only brings them a high quality of life but also lifts up their families and communities. One effective way to prepare students for important regional work is to increase student engagement in applied learning and independent research for benefit of the community and the environment; UH Hilo already excels at this in several fields and I would like to explore ways to open up this opportunity to even more students.

Traditionally we think of higher education as preparing young women and men for their future, but national trends are moving toward developing a new higher education model that also meets the needs of non-traditional students returning to finish a degree. This is a challenge facing universities throughout the country and if we want to stay current, we will need to adapt to this emerging trend not only to properly serve our region but also to thrive as an institution of higher education.

Woven into advancing the university to meet the needs of a modern student population is the challenge to improve retention and graduation rates. I support wholeheartedly the current ongoing efforts at UH Hilo to develop best practices to enable students to pursue their aspirations with purpose and confidence through to graduation and beyond, whether the student wishes to further her or his education or launch a meaningful career. I look forward to working with faculty and student affairs professionals to develop and strengthen innovative and effective ways to meet this challenge.

I am pleased to see UH Hilo placing a high importance on practicing, teaching, and researching sustainability and protecting the ‘āina, both on campus and in our island environment. Every student has a role to play—now and in the future—to help heal the emerging environmental crises facing our island, state, and Pacific region, and the university community and our graduates should be leaders and role models in this field.

We cannot achieve our aspirations alone. Building on partnerships with the local community, government agencies, and non-profit organizations, along with strengthening UH Hilo’s relationship with Hawai‘i Community College and partnering more with the Pālamanui campus, are crucial to all our success.

It is the university’s responsibility to take the lead in stewardship of regional economics, education, and improving the quality of life for all our island citizens and their communities. I start my new position as a chancellor ready to listen, learn, and collaborate as we prepare a new strategic plan for the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.

I mua!

Bonnie D. Irwin

 

Photo at top by Raiatea Arcuri: UH Hilo main entrance at West Kāwili Street.

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UH Hilo 2018-2019 Annual Report

Our successes are largely due to our talented faculty, staff and students who make UH Hilo a remarkable place of knowledge and learning.

Aloha UH Hilo ‘Ohana,

Marcia Sakai
Marcia Sakai

When I began my tenure as the Interim Chancellor for UH Hilo, one of my goals was to create a comprehensive report that highlights the accomplishments of our campus. I am pleased to share with you the UH Hilo 2018-2019 Annual Report.

Our successes are largely due to our talented faculty, staff and students who make UH Hilo a remarkable place of knowledge and learning.

Best wishes to all of you.

Marcia Sakai
Interim Chancellor

 

See also: UH Hilo 2017-2018 Annual Report

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Interim Chancellor’s message concerning the UH Hilo Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy

The college will take strong, proactive measures to reduce costs commensurate with an anticipated smaller incoming class for Fall 2019, and perhaps for the next several years.

Aloha UH Hilo ‘Ohana:

Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy University of Hawaii and Hilo sealI write today to inform you of news concerning our Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy (DKICP).

When the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy opened in 2007 there was a severe shortage of pharmacists in Hawai‘i and a shortage of capacity in pharmacy schools nationwide. DKICP was launched to address these gaps with an innovative financial plan that was based on a strong base of non-resident students who would complement local enrollment and pay a higher tuition rate.

While DKICP continues to serve a unique and vital mission for Hawai‘i and the Pacific, the rapidly changing healthcare environment in Hawai‘i, the Pacific, and the nation has negatively affected enrollment. As a result, DKICP will take strong, proactive measures to reduce costs commensurate with an anticipated smaller incoming class for Fall 2019, and perhaps for the next several years.

At the same time, DKICP will initiate a process of program redesign, consistent with ACPE accreditation, to help reverse the current enrollment decline by attracting more students. This will be complemented with an investment in aggressive, competitive recruitment initiatives, which will be enhanced with the availability of the new state-of-the-art DKICP education and research facility that opens Fall 2019 in our University Park of Science and Technology.

Painful as these measures are today, UH Hilo and DKICP share in the excitement of new opportunities so that we can continue to prepare our students to excel as they participate in and shape the dynamic and challenging field of pharmacy and healthcare in Hawai‘i and beyond.

Mahalo,

Marcia Sakai
Interim Chancellor

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