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Tag: Marcia Sakai

Interim Chancellor’s Column in Hawaii Tribune-Herald Special Section, University Town 2019

Column by Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai
Hawaii Tribune-Herald Special Section: University Town 2019
March 24, 2019

UH Hilo: A comprehensive university serving the community

Marcia Sakai
Marcia Sakai

The University of Hawai‘i at Hilo mission is to challenge students to reach their highest level of academic achievement by inspiring learning, discovery, and creativity inside and outside the classroom.

With core liberal arts values and an array of programs across a broad range of career pathways, our students complete an education that prepares them for continuous learning needed in the 21st century. By the time they graduate with advanced knowledge in their chosen major, our students have gained foundational skills in written communication, language, reasoning, and an appreciation for multiculturalism, humanities and the arts, and natural and social sciences.

Our students learn from many sources during their time with us, and I would like to focus this column on three foundational areas that prepare our students to achieve their goals and to be contributing members to the community.

Communication

With the deluge of information coming at us every day, good communication skills are crucial for professionals in the 21st century. This means mastery in delivering written and verbal information, and also in receiving information through active listening.

Throughout their years with us, students are required to explore and develop these skills through individual work and also through projects that require teamwork. For example, we have had students out in the community as interns listening to the needs of local businesses and organizations, helping to hone plans for better outcomes.

As we move into a data-filled future, communication also includes skills such as data visualization, a sophisticated form of scientific communication where large data sets are converted into simply designed presentations for other scientists or the general public. With new technology on campus, students are learning hands-on skills for creating effective data visualization products in a broad range of topical issues such as water conservation and natural disaster response.

Community

Building strong communities is extremely important in our local culture, and UH Hilo takes pride in doing outreach that helps raise the quality of life for everyone. Every student at UH Hilo is offered opportunities to apply their classroom learning to the real world through internships, service learning, and community activities.

For example, the Pacific Internship Program for Exploring Science (PIPES) immerses students in internships each summer to help solve problems affecting our communities, such as climate change and invasive species. Our pharmacy college sponsors events that showcase research on prevalent health issues. Student-athletes go into local classrooms to inspire elementary students to read. Our students give back by paying forward.

Further, the North Hawai‘i Education and Research Center in Honoka‘a, while honoring the history and traditional culture, helps local high school students prepare for college, provides adults with lifelong learning activities, and gives the town a meeting place to gather and create new memories.
And our Center for Community Engagement offers non-credit courses open to everyone interested in lifelong learning. The center also supports faculty in community-engaged teaching, a perfect example of UH Hilo’s adage, “One learns from many sources.”

Leadership

Our eyes are on the future, and it is clear that our island, region, and the world in general need knowledgeable, dedicated leaders to help communities meet unprecedented challenges. This is why a major goal of UH Hilo is to provide support to students to thrive, compete, and innovate to become leaders in their professional and personal lives.

One program to support this goal is the Student Leadership Development Program that instills cultural awareness, experiential learning, and wellness activities. The Ka Lama Ku Student Leadership Development Program is based on Native Hawaiian cultural values. And our UH Hilo Student Association is led by students honing their skills in politics, community organizing, and developing policy that will help solve the problems of tomorrow.

Moving into the future

Armed with an education founded in the liberal arts, the guidance of expert mentors, and a deep desire to make new discoveries that positively impact their communities, our students are learning from many sources and are already contributing to their selected fields, their communities, and the world.

Aloha,
Marcia Sakai

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Interim Chancellor hosts 2019 Spring Gathering: New faculty and staff welcomed to UH Hilo

Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai hosted an event this morning to welcome faculty and staff starting new positions at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. 

(In order of introductions)

Shaunda Maka‘imoku, Marcia Sakai, Jessica Kirkpatrick.
Left to right, Shaunda Maka‘imoku, Marcia Sakai, Jessica Kirkpatrick. Photos by Raiatea Arcuri, click to enlarge.

Office of Equal Opportunity

  • Shaunda Maka‘imoku, Compliance Officer

Office of Maunakea Management

  • Jessica Kirkpatrick, Research Management Support Specialist

‘Imiloa Astronomy Center

  • Jason Cadaoas, Building and Grounds Custodian
  • Anya Haunani Emi Tagawa, Academic Support
Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai, Assistant Professor Angela Faanunu, Assistant Professor Sijie Sun, Academic Support Specialist Cherilyn Keli‘i, Instructor of Communication Charles Findley, Interim Dean Michael Bitter.
Left to right: Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai, Assistant Professor Angela Faanunu, Assistant Professor Sijie Sun, Academic Support Specialist Cherilyn Keli‘i, Instructor of Communication Charles Findley, Interim Dean Michael Bitter. Photo by Raiatea Arcuri, click to enlarge.

Office of the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

  • Cherilyn Keli‘i-Marumoto, Academic Support

College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management

  • Saraswati Tokura-Ellsworth, Academic Support

College of Business and Economics

  • Angela Faanunu, Assistant Professor
  • Sijie Sun, Assistant Professor

College of Arts and Sciences

  • Charles Findley, Instructor of Communication

College of Natural and Health Sciences

  • JoyceTaylor-Norris, Instructor of Nursing
Peter Haliniak III and Kalei Rapoza.
(Left to right) Peter Haliniak III and Interim Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs Kalei Rapoza.

Office of Administrative Affairs

  • Peter Haliniak III, Janitor

Security Officers:

  • Timothy Ray
  • Mario Andres
  • Tai Mai
  • Donovan Oliveira
  • Glen Ramos
  • Keisha Siliga
  • Isaiah Tao
  • Tony Travis
Group photo
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Farrah-Marie Gomes (left) stands with newcomers to Division of Student Affairs: Lori Varize, Sarah Juran, Sherri Akau, Joshua Kerley, Claire Uyetake, and Min-Ling Li. Photo by Raiatea Arcuri, click to enlarge.

Division of Student Affairs

  • Sarah Juran, Counseling
  • Loriann Varize, Counseling
  • Joshua Kerley, Housing
  • Sherri Maeda-Akau, Housing
  • Min-Ling Li, Support
  • Claire Uyetake, Support
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Interim Chancellor’s Monthly Column, Feb. 2019: Supporting students to thrive and succeed

Priority #1 at UH Hilo: Supporting students to thrive and succeed.

By Marcia Sakai

Marcia Sakai
Marcia Sakai

A major goal of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo is to provide support to students to thrive, compete, innovate and lead in their professional and personal lives. This means we have a responsibility to develop best practices that enable students to pursue their own goals with purpose and confidence to see them through to graduation and then beyond to further education or a meaningful career.

Purpose First

One initiative to achieve this goal is a program that UH Hilo is implementing, along with several other UH campuses, to develop a new model of best-practice student advising tools. UH was selected by Complete College America as one of four state teams to participate in a 24-month initiative called Purpose First, where students are encouraged to explore career aspirations early in their college/university years.

This is the trend to success: make a career choice early. Gone are the days of recommending to students that they take general courses for the first two years and not worry about their major until later. Here’s why: An early career choice is then integrated into the student’s academic advising, with decisions made along the way based on real-time, region-specific labor market data currently available and reviewed by the students themselves.

Strada Education Network. Completion with a Purpose.The UH Purpose First  initiative, funded by a $1 million grant from Strada Education Network, enables students to pursue their college goals more purposefully and with confidence that their majors match their academic and personal strengths. They are also given a clearer understanding of future career opportunities.

Examples of activity underway at UH Hilo toward Purpose First include annual career fairs for the entire campus designed to connect students with employers from across the state, development of a shared plan for Career Advising between Academic Affairs and Student Affairs, and the inclusion of career topics in all classes.

In tandem, we’re transforming many traditional courses of study into interdisciplinary undergraduate curriculum that is more responsive to preparing graduates for further education or employment and leadership in the 21st century.

Evaluation of the effectiveness of these efforts will be implemented in fall 2019.

Enrollment Management Plan

The Purpose First program is part of our updated Enrollment Management Plan geared to preparing competent and transformational leaders of tomorrow through a data-driven enrollment management process from recruitment, to persistence, to graduation and beyond.

The plan calls for UH Hilo to increase its enrollment through strategic recruitment, well-rounded student support, and focused retention efforts. We’ve increased communication and access to financial aid information, adjusted awarding of institutional aid to support retention, expanded and enhanced digital outreach (email, web, and social media), increased UH community college transfer events and recruitment, and implemented texting communications for accepted students.

Opihi UH Hilo Student SuccessTo coordinate and oversee many new and existing undergraduate retention strategies, we’ve launched the ʻOpihi Student Success program with new hires to do proactive inreach to current students focused on registration and student support, and outreach to potential returning students who stopped out of UH Hilo but were within 15 credits of graduation.

We’ve also increased participation in the peer mentoring program for new freshmen and transfer students. Mass communication has expanded to remind students about important deadlines, processes, and events.

Further, in collaboration with the College of Business and Economics and the College of Arts and Sciences, ʻOpihi conducted individual reviews of progress to degrees for all 2,529 students at sophomore, junior or senior standing, including exchange students. And in addition to the students who stopped out, outreach is underway to students who experienced registration errors, and others who were deemed prospective returning students.

The goal of our new Enrollment Management Plan is to make UH Hilo a viable and successful choice for students from Hawai‘i, the continental U.S., and abroad who are interested in making an impact in a rapidly changing and diverse society. For details about the activities I’ve discussed in this column and more, see the Hilo section of UH System Enrollment Management Report released last month.

Aloha,

Marcia Sakai

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Message about sex discrimination and gender-based violence prevention resources

Message from the University of Hawai‘i System Offices:

Aloha to all UH students, faculty and staff,

Gold UH logo with the words UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII UA MAU KE EA O KA AINA I KA PONO

In light of recent federal efforts to revise regulations protecting students against sex discrimination, the University of Hawai‘i reaffirms its commitment to ensuring safe and respectful campus environments where everyone can strive toward their academic, career and personal goals. The issue of sex discrimination and gender-based violence is prevalent on college campuses nationwide, and UH is working to continue the progress already made toward addressing these issues on our campuses.

Students as well as our entire community have important roles to play by being aware of the issues, watching out for one another and reporting violations. Everyone is encouraged, if they have not already, to take the free, online Title IX training for students.

Online training for employees.

If you are a victim of intimate partner violence or any other type of sexual harassment or gender-based violence, please know that the following help is available, including on a confidential basis.

Confidential Resources

UH System Title IX and Office of Institutional Equity website

Campus Title IX Coordinators

We have made significant strides in addressing these issues over the past several years, but our goal is campus life free of sexual harassment and gender-based violence and we have even more to do.

Please enjoy a safe and successful academic semester!

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Upcoming Workshop for Faculty and Staff: Listening Well, The Art of Empathic Understanding

The Chancellor’s Professional Development Fund is sponsoring a national expert in listening and behavior change to conduct a workshop on campus in February. Faculty and staff are invited to attend.

William R. Miller
William R. Miller

Title: Listening Well: The Art of Empathic Understanding
Speaker: William R. Miller
Date: Wednesday, Feb. 13, 2019
Time: 9:00 am to 4:00 pm
Place: Campus Center 301, University of Hawai’i at Hilo

RSVP online by 12:00 pm on Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019.

Workshop

Listening Well: The Art of Empathic Understanding

The interpersonal skill of accurate empathy is a learnable ability with over 60 years of scientific evidence for its value in improving client outcomes. Though sometimes regarded as a “nonspecific” factor in counseling and psychotherapy, it is in fact well-specified and reliably measurable. It is the most studied of Carl Rogers’s three “necessary and sufficient” therapeutic conditions for change.

Prof. Miller has been studying and teaching accurate empathy for over 40 years, and it is a foundational skill in his well-known clinical method of motivational interviewing. Empathic listening is shown to improve outcomes in cognitive-behavior therapy. More generally, it is a valuable skill in interpersonal relationships, and one that he has often taught to clients, paraprofessionals, and clergy. This six-hour workshop will use a “tell-show-try” approach, with explanation, demonstration, and ample experiential practice of component skills.

Bio

William Miller is emeritus distinguished professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of New Mexico where he served as director of clinical training and co-founder of the Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addictions. He specializes in the development, testing, and dissemination of behavioral treatments for addictions.

With 45 years of experience in research and treatment, he has served as principal investigator for numerous research grants and contracts, founded a private practice group, directed a large public treatment program, and served as a consultant to many organizations including the United States Senate, the World Health Organization, the National Academy of Sciences, and the National Institutes of Health. He maintains an active interest in the interface of spirituality and psychology.

Miller’s publications include over 50 books and 400 articles and chapters, and the Institute for Scientific Information has listed him as one of the world’s most cited scientists.

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