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Tag: Community Outreach

Students & Parents are invited to “Brown Bag with University Leadership,” July 21, via Zoom

Students and parents are invited to the next “Brown Bag with University Leadership,” a live Q & A, Tuesday, July 21, from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. via Zoom. Zoom info is below.

Chancellor Bonnie Irwin will be joined by Ken Hon, Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Farrah-Marie Gomes, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, and Kalei Rapoza, Interim Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs.

Link: https://hawaii.zoom.us/j/98549554949

Meeting ID: 985 4955 4949

Passcode: 242393

More info, contact Deneen Louie.

Questions may be submitted in advance to urevents@hawaii.edu.


This meeting is now available for viewing via YouTube:

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Chancellor’s message on racial and social injustice

At UH Hilo, we will continue to live up to our responsibility as one of the most diverse universities in the nation by making that designation mean something, as we continue to spread aloha into our community and beyond. We will continue to combat systemic racism.

Dear UH Hilo ‘Ohana,

UH Hilo seal, red lettering University of Hawaii and the state motto.I have been struggling to find the right words to say that might bring solace to our campus in the wake of the murder of George Floyd last week at the hands of police officers who are trained to serve and protect. This event is both angering and heart-wrenching, and the fact that this is not an isolated incident, but one in a series of attacks on black and brown bodies, makes it all the more maddening. Since the very earliest days of the United States, race and racism have often overpowered justice. Ninety-nine years ago today, the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, burned in one of the deadliest racial incidents in American history. And still, in the twenty-first century, racial justice still eludes us.

To the African American members of our ‘ohana, we see you. We can only imagine your grief and anger, but we hear you. On our campus, you are loved and valued. At the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, we will continue to live up to our responsibility as one of the most diverse universities in the nation by making that designation mean something, as we continue to spread aloha into our community and beyond. We will continue to combat systemic racism.

Our students, faculty, and staff will value one another and the contributions made by each member of our university community. We will respect the right of each member of our community to live and work in an environment free from violence and hatred. We will honor the dignity of every member of our campus family. And we will continue to instill these values in our students and community. Discrimination has no place on our campus, and we will be guided by aloha and a commitment to equity in all we do.

Stay safe and well,

Bonnie D. Irwin
Chancellor

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Chancellor Bonnie Irwin: Restructuring management of Maunakea will provide greater accountability, transparency

(This editorial by University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Chancellor Bonnie D. Irwin was published by the Hawaii Tribune-Herald and West Hawaii Today newspapers on May 20, 2020.)

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie Irwin

Stewardship and telescope operations resumed on University of Hawai‘i managed lands on Maunakea after suspension of all activities for nearly two months because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The university is pleased that Gov. David Ige identified Maunakea as part of the state’s list of low-risk organizations that are safe to reopen. This allows the university to ramp up its stewardship initiatives and for UH observatories, along with the rest of the Maunakea Observatories, to gradually restart astronomical observations.

UH and the Maunakea Observatories will continue to follow all health guidelines from state and local officials, as the safety of all employees remains a top priority. The resumption of operations is being done in phases and, for now, includes minimizing activity and restricting summit work to limited observing and essential telescope operations including critical maintenance of instrumentation and observatory facilities.

Though operations on Maunakea had effectively ceased because of the health crisis, UH’s work to improve its stewardship of the mauna continued. In April, UH Executive Director of Maunakea Stewardship Greg Chun presented the UH Board of Regents a plan for a new internal management structure that provides greater accountability and transparency. The regents are expected to vote on the new internal management structure during their May 21 meeting.

In addition to calling for the internal management restructuring plan, a Board of Regents resolution adopted in November 2019 also called upon UH administration to consider and analyze overarching governance models for Maunakea that the state might choose to advance in the future. In April, Chun presented for discussion four alternative models: (1) creation of a new stewardship authority attached to a state agency; (2) Board of Land and Natural Resources and Department of Land and Natural Resources resuming management and stewardship of Maunakea; (3) issuance of the master lease to an entirely new third party, directly responsible for all aspects of managing and stewarding the mountain and astronomy support; and (4) establishing a collaborative stewardship model involving all stakeholders in which UH would hold a master lease only for what is referred to as the astronomy precinct and Hale Pohaku.

Chun highlighted examples on which these models were patterned and shared the considerations that might drive a decision in the future by state policymakers as to a preferred model.

The university also announced in February that the decommissioning of the first two telescopes is tentatively scheduled to be completed by 2023.

UH is also working on the implementation of the administrative rules signed by Gov. Ige in January and approved by the Board of Regents in November 2019. With the rules, the university will be able to address excessive traffic, establish guidelines for commercial tour operations and better protect natural and cultural resources.

Finally, significant progress is being made on utilizing the expertise of the UH Hilo ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center to enhance and improve the educational and cultural programming at the Maunakea Visitor Information Station and Hale Pohaku, the mid-level facility on Maunakea.

These initiatives are just the beginning of the myriad improvements to our stewardship we have in motion. We look forward to building on those efforts in collaboration with the community and our stakeholders to create a sustainable world-class research enterprise and knowledge industry of which the state can be proud.

Bonnie D. Irwin
Chancellor, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo

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Chancellor’s Monthly Column, March 2020: Looking back, looking ahead

The last UH Hilo Strategic Plan guided our efforts in student success, diversity, research, and community collaboration. But the work of bettering ourselves and our campus is not over; hence the strategic doing initiative that we begin now.

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie D. Irwin

Preparation is well underway in developing a new Strategic Plan at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. As we prepare to launch our “Strategic Doing Initiative” that will lay out new long-term goal areas for the campus and identify priorities for action, it pays to reflect on our previous strategic plan and how far we have come over the last decade, despite the many challenges faced as a campus and community.

Too often strategic plans are put on a shelf or posted on a website and forgotten, but just because we may not be able to rattle off all the goals and objectives in the last plan, it does not mean that plan has not guided our efforts in student success, diversity, research, and community collaboration.

Let me share a few examples of our progress.

Place-based learning experiences

One of our main goals is to provide learning experiences and support to prepare students to thrive, compete, innovate, and lead in their professional and personal lives. We are making good progress in this area.

Our students are doing their studies in a culturally, economically, socially, and geographically diverse place, the perfect preparation for being productive citizens in a global community. Anchoring this diversity is the recognition that an important knowledge base resides in the indigenous people of Hawai‘i—a concept now policy for the UH System.

It is from this foundation of diversity and Native Hawaiian ways-of-knowing that UH Hilo now grows, and you can see it in new programs.

For example, the kinesiology and exercise sciences program just won a national award for inclusive excellence and diversity; the nursing program has a strong transcultural component; medical anthropology focuses on effects of globalization on health disparities; and programs in sustainable agriculture and environmental science have strong Native Hawaiian influence. These programs and more are building relevant intellectual capital for our region to address the challenges of a diverse population and fragile environment. Our graduates are prepared to lead the way.

Vibrant campus

Another goal, aimed to foster a vibrant and sustainable environment in which to study, work and live, has also made great strides.

We now have six living-learning communities where students thrive. Technology upgrades, new student media rooms, and expansion of Wi-Fi have helped bring our campus into the modern world. Several solar-powered gathering spaces have been built with more planned. Library hours are extended. Both the Campus Center Dining Room and Mookini Library have undergone redesigns that engender rest, conversation, and rejuvenation.

And a UH Hilo Sustainability Policy is now in place, governing virtually all growth on campus. Photo-voltaic is part of all new construction. Electric demand meters have been installed to track usage. LED light conversion is completed in over 20 buildings. Student-driven programs to recycle, compost (including food waste), and maintain sustainable gardens on campus are established. The new data science program, supported by the National Science Foundation, is part of a statewide water sustainability project. This is great progress.

Regional stewardship

I’d also like to highlight the good progress we’ve made in the goal that addresses our impact on the community, island, and state through responsive higher education, community partnerships, and knowledge and technology transfer.

We have strengthened the P-12 pipeline through programs such as Early College and Upward Bound; Nā Pua No‘eau, established at UH Hilo, now a UH systemwide program in support of Native Hawaiian students; and Hawaiian language medium schools thriving throughout the state.

We work with and provide technology, expertise, and research data to many government agencies—County of Hawai‘i, National Park Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of Interior, and the U.S. Forest Service, to name a few—in tackling local environmental problems such as lava flows, soil erosion, and Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.

On campus, the tenants at UH Hilo University Park of Science and Technology help advance our entire community through partnerships between the university and public and private organizations. UH Hilo also now partners extensively with Hawai‘i Community College, sharing resources, facilities, services, pipelines for transfer, Hawaiian protocol development, and expertise.

Of course, the work of bettering ourselves and our campus is not over; hence the strategic doing initiative that we begin now. What we value remains constant: creating environments in which students will thrive and succeed; bettering our local community, island and state through our research and community outreach; and, fostering a respectful and supportive workplace for our staff and faculty.

Aloha,
Bonnie D. Irwin

 

Feature image at top of post is of painting, “Voyage of the Navigator,” by Clayton Young (11X14, 2013), courtesy of ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center.

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Chancellor’s Monthly Column, Dec. 2019: Expressing gratitude for what the community does for UH Hilo

Above: Interns, mentors, alumni, and staff from the Pacific Internship Programs for Exploring Science, known as PIPES, celebrate winning the Outstanding Leadership Award at the 26th Annual Hawai‘i Conservation Conference held in Honolulu, July 10, 2019. PIPES is a wonderful example of professionals and experts in the local community providing some of the best learning experiences for students. Courtesy photo.

By Bonnie D. Irwin

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie D. Irwin

One of the things I love most about the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo is the way the community is so intricately woven into the university’s success. This is the beauty of regional universities: the community and university are interconnected, so the people are interconnected, and all are working together to help everyone move successfully into the future.

As we near the end of the year, a time to celebrate the holidays, I’d like to take this opportunity to express gratitude for what the community does for UH Hilo, especially for our students.

For example, a mainstay to the university’s success is the many partnerships we have with businesses, schools, organizations, agencies, and community groups across the island that provide some of the best learning experiences for our students. One area where this is especially effective is in internships.

Internships put students in real-world situations that give them the opportunity to use the skills and knowledge they are developing in their academic work. Many of our students are working with local groups to conduct research and do community outreach that befits everyone and, in many cases, the environment. None if this would be possible without the successful business people, exemplary professionals, and dedicated public servants who mentor and support our students.

For example, a cohort from our tropical conservation biology and environmental science graduate program has recently completed internships on the island at several different organizations: Hawai‘i Island Hawksbill Sea Turtle Recovery Project, the Big Island Invasive Species Committee, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Hui Mālama I ke Ala ‘Ūlili, and Hawai‘i Natural Area Reserve System. In each of these projects, experts in their field mentor our students in research and/or community service projects—on behalf of the university, let me say mahalo to each and every one of you for taking these students under your wings.

About 35 of our business students did or are doing internships in the community in 2019. Some of these are with local businesses such as HPM Building Supply (owned by the Fujimoto family, who also has established an endowment that benefits students in the College of Business and Economics) and Suisan, Hilo’s commercial fishing hub. These internships are established by longtime Hilo families who care about our students and who value our students’ contributions to their companies—our appreciation to the owners and employees of these businesses is immense.

Over the years, marine science students have interned with several local businesses in both professional and research-based positions: Kampachi Farms, Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System, Ke Kai Ola of The Marine Mammal Center. Quite a few of the interns have been hired at the place where they interned such as at the Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center, Ocean Rider Seahorse Farm, Kona Diving, and Hawai‘i Wildlife Center. At each of these places our students found dedicated mentors who not only guided them in the task at hand, but also helped them find the path to their future—mahalo to you.

These are just a few examples of members of our community who dedicate their time and expertise to our students and to whom we feel much gratitude—mahalo all.

I would be remiss in writing a column on gratitude to not include two groups of people who are foundational blocks of UH Hilo.

I send a big aloha to our Vulcan Booster Club. The club receives donations from alumni, friends, and family to provide student-athletes with the support they need—through scholarships and other funding—to succeed in sports AND in their academics. And Boosters are the biggest, most enthusiastic fans at the games! A big mahalo to all members of the club.

Before I close, let me send a big aloha and mahalo to the many donors who contributed to UH Hilo this year. Behind every donation is someone who really cares about our students. Some donors see it as an investment in the future. Alumni donors may see it as a way to pay it forward. All see it as a way to expand access to higher education and help students get their degree so they can successfully move into the future to change the world.

From the bottom of my heart, mahalo to all for your support of UH Hilo.

Aloha,

Bonnie D. Irwin

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