Skip to content →

Tag: Academics

Guidance on Instructional Activities Associated With Pu‘uhuluhulu

Memo from UH Vice President for Academic Planning and Policy: The University of Hawai‘i will maintain a learning environment that encourages and accepts the free and fair exchange of ideas.

Donald Straney
Donald Straney

UH Hilo Ohana:

Donald Straney, University of Hawai‘i Vice President for Academic Planning and Policy, has provided a memorandum on Guidance on Instructional Activities Associated With Pu‘uhuluhulu.

MEMORANDUM

August 7, 2019

TO: Members of the UH Faculty and Staff
FROM: Donald 0. Straney, PhD, Vice President for Academic Planning and Policy, UH System

SUBJECT: Guidance on Instructional Activities Associated With Pu‘uhuluhulu

There is a list of courses that faculty are offering for students to take remotely while staying in the Pu‘uhuluhulu region of Hawai‘i Island. The list is primarily built around already existing on-line or independent study options. However, there are also some face-to-face courses listed.

We appreciate faculty support for students who are participating in this important moment in history, and that the learning opportunities presented by the list will in many cases literally bring the course material to life. We know that faculty members who have offered their courses to students who wish to remain away from campus are doing so with respect to the policies and procedures of their campus.

We offer the following guidance to clear up any misconceptions, note current policies that may be applicable, and to make sure we are all aligned in how best to proceed.

[…]

Click here to read full Memorandum.

Comments closed

Chancellor Bonnie Irwin’s first monthly column, July 2019: UH Hilo as a gateway for upward mobility

It is the university’s responsibility to take the lead in stewardship of regional economics, education, and improving the quality of life for all our island citizens and their communities.

By Bonnie D. Irwin

Bonnie Irwin
Bonnie D. Irwin

As I begin my tenure as chancellor at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, I find a campus community hard at work preparing to develop a new strategic plan. Through a series of over 40 discussions that began last fall with faculty, staff, students and the local community, information is being gleaned and groundwork laid to produce a collaborative plan to achieve the highest of aspirations.

My favorite definition of leadership is that it is a process of moving an organization from its current reality to its aspirations. My first task at UH Hilo is to listen and learn what the campus and community aspirations are and then focus our energy toward achieving them, all the while making sure we are ambitious enough in those aspirations to really help the island with its needs—economic, educational, and cultural—while also protecting the ‘āina through sustainable activities.

I take this responsibility to heart. I strongly believe in the concept of regional stewardship for comprehensive universities: i.e., that a primary mission of our campus is to lift up the region, in this case Hawai‘i Island. One of the reasons I wanted to come to UH Hilo is because of our unique cultural emphasis in programs and curriculum, notably the acclaimed work being done to revitalize Native Hawaiian language and culture for the benefit of not only Hawai‘i’s indigenous people but also everyone in the state. The future of our university and our local community are inextricably linked.

Let me share some thoughts about where my attention is already focused.

I envision UH Hilo as a gateway for upward mobility. This means educating and preparing our students for meaningful employment that not only brings them a high quality of life but also lifts up their families and communities. One effective way to prepare students for important regional work is to increase student engagement in applied learning and independent research for benefit of the community and the environment; UH Hilo already excels at this in several fields and I would like to explore ways to open up this opportunity to even more students.

Traditionally we think of higher education as preparing young women and men for their future, but national trends are moving toward developing a new higher education model that also meets the needs of non-traditional students returning to finish a degree. This is a challenge facing universities throughout the country and if we want to stay current, we will need to adapt to this emerging trend not only to properly serve our region but also to thrive as an institution of higher education.

Woven into advancing the university to meet the needs of a modern student population is the challenge to improve retention and graduation rates. I support wholeheartedly the current ongoing efforts at UH Hilo to develop best practices to enable students to pursue their aspirations with purpose and confidence through to graduation and beyond, whether the student wishes to further her or his education or launch a meaningful career. I look forward to working with faculty and student affairs professionals to develop and strengthen innovative and effective ways to meet this challenge.

I am pleased to see UH Hilo placing a high importance on practicing, teaching, and researching sustainability and protecting the ‘āina, both on campus and in our island environment. Every student has a role to play—now and in the future—to help heal the emerging environmental crises facing our island, state, and Pacific region, and the university community and our graduates should be leaders and role models in this field.

We cannot achieve our aspirations alone. Building on partnerships with the local community, government agencies, and non-profit organizations, along with strengthening UH Hilo’s relationship with Hawai‘i Community College and partnering more with the Pālamanui campus, are crucial to all our success.

It is the university’s responsibility to take the lead in stewardship of regional economics, education, and improving the quality of life for all our island citizens and their communities. I start my new position as a chancellor ready to listen, learn, and collaborate as we prepare a new strategic plan for the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.

I mua!

Bonnie Irwin

 

Photo at top by Raiatea Arcuri: UH Hilo main entrance at West Kāwili Street.

Comments closed

UH Hilo 2018-2019 Annual Report

Our successes are largely due to our talented faculty, staff and students who make UH Hilo a remarkable place of knowledge and learning.

Aloha UH Hilo ‘Ohana,

Marcia Sakai
Marcia Sakai

When I began my tenure as the Interim Chancellor for UH Hilo, one of my goals was to create a comprehensive report that highlights the accomplishments of our campus. I am pleased to share with you the UH Hilo 2018-2019 Annual Report.

Our successes are largely due to our talented faculty, staff and students who make UH Hilo a remarkable place of knowledge and learning.

Best wishes to all of you.

Marcia Sakai
Interim Chancellor

 

See also: UH Hilo 2017-2018 Annual Report

Comments closed

Announcement: Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Search Committee named

Aloha UH Hilo ‘Ohana,

UH Hilo seal, red lettering University of Hawaii and the state motto.I am pleased to announce the appointment of the search committee for the next University of Hawai‘i at Hilo vice chancellor for academic affairs. The committee is expected to begin its work in August.

It is important that we recruit and hire an experienced leader with the vision and energy to develop and advance our campus strategic academic priorities.

The committee is charged with the responsibility of screening applicants, interviewing qualified applicants online and then the finalists in person.

The 13-member committee represents the diverse perspective of the campus including faculty from each of the colleges, the Faculty Congress, and direct reports to the vice chancellor:

Co-Chairs

  • Bruce Matthews, Dean, College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management
  • Jené Michaud, Chair and Professor, Department of Geology

Committee members

  • Lois Fujiyoshi, Executive Director, Budget and Business Management
  • Lara Gomez, Director of Clinical Education, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy
  • Charmaine Higa-McMillan, Professor, Department of Psychology
  • Rodney Jubilado, Chair, Division of Humanities; Associate Professor, Filipino Studies, Department of Languages
  • Jim Mellon, Executive Director, Global and Intercultural Education Programs;
    Director, International Student Services and Intercultural Education, Division of Student Affairs
  • Hiapo Perreira, Associate Professor, Academic Division Chair, Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language
  • Jan Ray, Chair, Faculty Congress; Professor, School of Education
  • Joseph Sanchez, Director, Mookini Library
  • Sijie Sun, Assistant Professor, Marketing, College of Business and Economics
  • Michael Taylor, President, UH Hilo Student Association
  • Shelby Wong, Curriculum, Catalog, Graduate Division Specialist

Mahalo,

Marcia Sakai
Interim Chancellor

Comments closed

2019-2020 Chancellor’s Scholarship recipients named

The competitive award, valued in excess of $29,300, covers four years of tuition for selected students graduating from a Hawai‘i high school.

UH Hilo seal, red lettering University of Hawaii and the state motto.Eleven students from Hawai‘i public and private high schools have been awarded the prestigious 2019-2020 Chancellor’s Scholarship at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.

Recipients

  • Sabina Boo-Riversa, Kea‘au High School
  • Kawailehua Burnz, Kapa‘a High School
  • Nancy Costales, Christian Liberty Academy
  • Taylor Eleola, Hawai‘i Baptist Academy
  • Bree Foster, Kamehameha – Hawai‘i Campus
  • David Freund, Kea‘au High School
  • Joshua Irwin, Waiakea High School
  • Kit Neikirk, Connections Public Charter School
  • Nicole Otsuka, Maui High School
  • Ashley Rynkewicz, Waiakea High School
  • Jaedyn Pavao, Kamehameha – Kapalama Campus

Award

The award, valued in excess of $29,300, covers four years of tuition for students graduating from a Hawai‘i high school who earned either a grade point average of at least 3.5, a combined 1800 SAT (reading, writing, math), or a composite score of 27 on the ACT while demonstrating leadership and/or community service.

Recipients are are required to enroll as full-time students and earn a minimum of 24 credits each academic year. They must also maintain a cumulative GPA of 3.25 and participate in leadership activities and/or community service with other chancellor’s scholars.

Media release

Comments closed