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UH Hilo Interim Chancellor's Blog Posts

Chancellor accepts final draft of 2011-2015 Strategic Plan

The University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s Strategic Planning Committee* announced today that Chancellor Straney has accepted the final draft of UH Hilo’s 2011-2015 Strategic Plan. The chancellor will outline processes to support its implementation at the start of the fall semester. The plan will be sent to the UH system Board of Regents this coming academic year.

The plan was endorsed by the three governance/advisory bodies represented on the Strategic Planning Committee: Faculty Congress, Hanakahi Council, and UH Hilo Student Association. From those people who completed the endorsement surveys, there was an indication of 88% endorsement from faculty and staff, and 84% from students.

The final draft is the culmination of many months of work and significant input from UH Hilo stakeholders. The Strategic Planning Committee’s final progress report summarizes the activities of the committee and next steps on approval and implementation of the plan.

For more information: email uhhplan@hawaii.edu

*Strategic Planning Committee:

  • Maria Haws (College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management)
  • Errol Yudko (College of Arts and Sciences: Social Sciences Division)
  • Mazen Hamad (College of Arts and Sciences: Natural Sciences Division)
  • Jackie Johnson (College of Arts and Sciences: Humanities Division)
  • Kelly Burke (College of Business and Economics, and Committee Chair)
  • Karen Pellegrin (College of Pharmacy)
  • Pila Wilson (Ka Haka ‘Ula of Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language)
  • Thora Abarca (Non-Instructional Faculty, Library)
  • Kainoa Ariola (Non-Instructional Faculty, Advising)
  • Harry Yada (Staff, Real Property)
  • Jim Cromwell (Staff, Admissions)
  • Marcia Sakai (Executive Representative, Committee Vice-Chair)
  • Elizabeth Stacy (Faculty Congress Representative)
  • Gail Makuakane-Lundin (Hanakahi Council Representative)
  • Dee Drozario (Student Representative)
  • Tracey Niimi (Student Alternate)
  • Barry Mark (Community Member)
  • Siān Millard (Strategic Planning Coordinator, Non-Voting Member)

UH Hilo in the news: NASA and Hawai‘i strike space exploration deal; lunar research park to be located at UH Hilo

Under the agreement, the state is proposing to explore the development of a prototype International Lunar Research Park at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. The partnership will contribute to the development of education programs and foster economic opportunities including new, high-tech jobs.

HONOLULU — NASA and the State of Hawai‘i have agreed to collaborate on a wide range of activities to promote America’s human and robotic exploration of space. The partnership also will contribute to the development of education programs and foster economic opportunities including new, high-tech jobs.

Governor Neil Abercrombie and NASA Associate Deputy Administrator Rebecca Keiser signed a two-year agreement, formally called a non-reimbursable Space Act Agreement Annex, during a ceremony yesterday in the Governor’s Office. The ceremony was held on the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s historic announcement committing the country to land an American on the moon and return him safely before the end of the decade.

“Hawai‘i has been part of America’s space activities from the beginning of the space program when Apollo astronauts trained in the islands for their historic missions to the moon,” Governor Abercrombie said. “This partnership with NASA will broaden educational and employment opportunities for our local families and bring dollars into our economy.”

The agreement establishes a partnership between NASA’s Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, Calif., and Hawai‘i to explore and test new technologies, capabilities and strategies supporting America’s space exploration and development goals.

Under the agreement, the state is proposing to explore the development of a prototype International Lunar Research Park at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. It would use the state’s unique terrain, which is similar to that of the moon and Mars, to enable development and testing of advanced automated and tele-robotic vehicles. Researchers would benefit from Hawai‘i’s natural geography, advanced communications, power generation and other technologies required for space exploration.

“This is the type of participatory exploration involving universities and small- to mid-sized high technology companies that is becoming an increasingly important component of the 21st century space program,” Keiser said. “Americans want to participate directly and personally in space activities. As we have seen from NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services project and the Centennial Challenges prize competitions, harvesting the country’s innovative talent is important to the success of our future endeavors in space. The space frontier is opening in novel and exciting ways.”

The state will provide the prototype test environment and infrastructure for the proposed analog test facilities. NASA will evaluate new concepts and models for conducting space exploration. The state will explore the potential to develop and mature innovative space-related technologies for educational, industry and government use.

“From NASA’s perspective, this partnership can inspire ideas and applications from analog test sites that can be generalized to space exploration and development of the moon and other planetary bodies,” said Ames Director Pete Worden.

The state’s Office of Aerospace Development will be the lead state agency for the project, enhancing dialogue and coordination among the state, private and academic partners to enable growth and diversification of the state’s aerospace economy.

“We support NASA’s goal to promote public-private partnerships and multinational alliances to help reduce the cost, enhance the feasibility and accelerate the implementation of future space missions – leading to settlements beyond low-Earth orbit,” said Jim Crisafulli, director of Hawai‘i’s Office of Aerospace Development. “Locally, this collaboration should catalyze Hawai‘i-based economic innovation and engage engineers, scientists, educators, and students, as well as commercial entrepreneurs, to increase the opportunities and benefits of space exploration.”

For more information about the International Lunar Research Park, visit: https://sites.google.com/site/internationallunarresearchpark

For more information about Ames, visit:
http://www.nasa.gov/ames

For more information about Hawai‘i’s aerospace initiatives, visit: http://aerospacehawaii.info

Doctor of Nursing Practice program approved by UH Board of Regents

Katharyn Daub
Katharyn Daub

The University of Hawaiʻi Board of Regents approved at its May meeting a Doctor of Nursing Practice program at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo School of Nursing. The new program will begin August 2012 for post baccalaureate students and will be open to post masters-level students in 2013.

“The UH Hilo School of Nursing is responding to the concerns of our community and has worked diligently to improve community access to quality healthcare in Hawaiʻi,” noted Katharyn Daub, director of the school of nursing.

The Doctor of Nursing Practice is a doctoral degree for nurses at the highest level of nursing practice. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing has proposed that the DNP degree be the level of entry for all advanced practice nurses by 2015.

“The focus on rural and transcultural health will encompass training for practitioners that spans the entire life cycle from birth through death,” Daub said. “The program will also focus on rural problems to improve healthcare in our medically underserved community that includes western and indigenous health practices.”

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