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Month: February 2014

2014 Chancellor’s Spring Welcome

Student Affairs
(L-R) Elizabeth Reinstein, Certified Athletic Trainer; Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Luoluo Hong; Myla Gumayagay, Communication Specialist, Admissions; and Nani Munekata, Office Assistant, Financial Aid.
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Matt Platz welcomes newcomer KATHY COOKSEY, Assistant Professor, Physics and Astronomy
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Matt Platz welcomes newcomer Kathy Cooksey, Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy, at the 2014 Spring Welcome event.

New faculty and staff were welcomed to the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo at the 2014 Chancellor’s Spring Welcome held last week. New to the university community are:

Academic Affairs:

  • KATHY COOKSEY, Assistant Professor, Physics and Astronomy
  • CHERIE CHU, Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice
  • PATRICIA UBER, Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice.
K. Rapoza, Institutional Support, HR, JAY ABILEY-DESA,Groundskeeper, Aux
(L-R) K. Rapoza, Institutional Support, Human Resources; Vice Chancellor for Administrative Affairs Marcia Sakai; and R, Jay Abiley-Desa, Groundskeeper.

Administrative Affairs:

  • JAY ABILEY-DESA, Groundskeeper, Auxillary
  • K. RAPOZA, Institutional Support, Human Resources

Student Affairs:

  • MYLA GUMAYAGAY, Communication Specialist, Admissions
  • ELIZABETH REINSTEIN, Certified Athletic Trainer
  • NANI MUNEKATA, Office Assistant, Financial Aid

2014 Legislative Testimony by the Chancellor relating to after school program at ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center

UH logo

Testimony Presented Before the
Senate Committee on Higher Education
February 11, 2014 at 3:30 p.m.
by
Donald O. Straney
Chancellor, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

SB 3093 – RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII AT HILO

Chair Taniguchi, Vice Chair Kahele and Members of the Committee:

My name is Donald Straney, Chancellor of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo (UH Hilo). We support SB 3093 that appropriates funds to UH Hilo to support its memorandum of agreement with RISE 21st Century After School Program and the implementation of the agreement by the ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaiʻi, a unit of UH Hilo.

The ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center of Hawaiʻi has been cultivating community partnerships that targets greater engagement by Hawaiʻi Island youth with the resources of UH Hilo. A positive partnership has been established with the RISE 21st Century After School Program that serves as a community and cultural resource for disadvantaged Native Hawaiian youth in Keaukaha. The proposal will help to expand collaborative opportunities supported by staffing and curriculum resources to establish mentorships, initiate project-based learning activities, and offer academic and career planning. UH Hilo views our continued partnership and collaboration with RISE as a positive solution to increase access to higher education and career opportunities for Native Hawaiians on Hawaiʻi Island.

We support SB 3093 provided that its passage does not replace or adversely impact priorities in our BOR approved budget.

Thank you for the opportunity to testify on SB 3093. Aloha.

~~~

Chancellor’s testimony on this topic to Senate and House committees:

SB 3093 RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT HILO February 11, 2014
SB 3093 SD1 March 18, 2014
HB 2443 RELATING TO THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I AT HILO February 4, 2014
HB 2443 HD1 February 21, 2014

Fundraiser for tennis scholarship held at luxurious Water Falling Estate in Ninole

Chancellor Dr. Donald Straney, Interim Director of Athletics Tim Moore, Hui Kako‘o Kenika /Hilo Brokers President Kelly Moran, Dr. Ruth Matsuura, Waterfalling Estate co-owner/designer/builder Scott Watson, Waterfalling Estate co-owner Laurie Robertson, UH Hilo Tennis Coach Karl Sloss.
(L-R) Chancellor Donald Straney, Interim Director of Athletics Tim Moore, Hui Kako‘o Kenika /Hilo Brokers President Kelly Moran, Dr. Ruth Matsuura, Water Falling Estate co-owner/designer/builder Scott Watson, Water Falling Estate co-owner Laurie Robertson, UH Hilo Tennis Coach Karl Sloss.
Aerial view of the Water Falling Estate in Ninoole on the Hamakua Coast of the Big Island.
Aerial view of Water Falling Estate in Ninole.

A benefit fundraiser for the Richard and Ruth Matsuura Vulcan Tennis Endowed Scholarship (University of Hawai‘i at Hilo) was held Feb.8 at the luxurious 8-acre Water Falling Estate in Ninole on the Big Island. The event raised nearly $25,000.

Guests explored the grounds of the beautiful estate, watched exhibition tennis matches, and enjoyed ono food.

Read more about the event at Big Island Now.

L-R: Newton Chu, Mariko Miho, Director, UH Hilo Development Office, Don, Barry Taniguchi, Roberta Chu.
L-R: Newton Chu; Mariko Miho, director of UH Hilo Development Office; Chancellor Don Straney; Barry Taniguchi; and Roberta Chu.

High school students visit UH Hilo campus for Job Shadow Day

Members of SHYLI Job Shadow project visit with UH Hilo leadership.
A group participating in this year’s Job Shadow Day stands outside UH Hilo’s chancellor’s office. (l-r front row) Katie Schwind, project coordinator; student Bethany Anderson; student Sherry Anne Pancho; Farrahmarie Gomes, director at UH Hilo’s North Hawai‘i Education and Research Center; (l-r, back row) local farmer and businessman Richard Ha; Steve Colbert, assistant professor of marine science; Bruce Mathews, dean of the College of Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resource Management; student KaMele Sanchez.

A group of enthusiastic Big Island youth recently visited a variety of programs at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo as part of the national Job Shadow Day. The local group’s activities were organized by the Sustainable Hawai’i Youth Leadership Initiative or SHYLI.

“As UH Hilo moves towards providing an applied learning experience for every student,” says UH Hilo Chancellor Don Straney, “we are excited to be working with partners like SHYLI to prepare the young people of Hawai‘i for a productive future for themselves, our island and our state.”

Members of SHYLI, made up of high school students, spent time with Bruce Mathews, dean of UH Hilo’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management; Michael Shintaku, professor of plant pathology; and Maria Haws, professor of aquaculture and director of UH Hilo’s Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center at Hilo Bay, among others.

“The farm is extremely self-sustained, culturing their own algae, spawning their own oysters, and raising and selling them for profit,” says participant KaMele Sanchez, a student at Honoka‘a High.

The group also spent time with Mayor Billy Kenoi, learned about the Hawai‘i County Food Sufficiency Baseline Study, visited with local farmer and businessman Richard Ha, and talked story with experts on geothermal production.

“I for one, like to talk, and all of these folks did too,” says KaMele. “It wasn’t everyday talk story. It was about real problems happening now, serious topics and the scientific, practical, and economical stand points. I loved it!”

Participant Sherry Anne Pancho, also from Honoka‘a High, shadowed Linda Connelly and Aaron Jacobs, professors at UH Hilo’s Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy.

“We are very impressed with Sherry Anne and SHYLI’s efforts to provide Hawai‘i’s students with firsthand experiences in potential career paths and believe this is a valuable investment in the sustainability of our future workforce,” says Professor Jacobs.

Group participates in video conference.
Group participates in Oceanit reception on O‘ahu via video conference in Chancellor’s Office.

A reception was hosted on O‘ahu by Oceanit, Hawai‘i’s largest and most diversified science and engineering company, where students shared their life-changing experiences with business, government and academic leaders. Oceanit is a recipient of the Corporate STEM Award for its support of the development of future leaders.

The Oceanit reception was simultaneously video conferenced to the chancellor’s offices at UH Hilo where Big Island SHYLI youth and their mentors shared their experiences with Matthew Platz, vice chancellor for academic affairs, Steve Colbert from the marine science department, biologist Pat Hart, Dean Bruce Mathews, and Farrah Gomes from UH Hilo’s North Hawai‘i Education and Research Center.

Group participates in video conference on campus.
Group participates in video conference.

Members of the group also visited with Hawai‘i Electric Company (Renewable Energy Program), Aloha Veterinary Center, Rainbow Friends animal sanctuary, and state legislators.

“It’s no secret that our world is facing some major challenges in the coming decades,” says SHYLI project coordinator Katie Schwind. “These challenges will take engaged, creative, individuals from our coming generations to take the reigns of change and find solutions for islands. Hawai‘i, and many rural and island areas, commonly struggle to limit the brain drain when there are limited economic opportunities available. SHYLI works with active young people who have been nominated by community members who recognize their potential to be change makers in their future.”

About National Job Shadow Day

The National (Groundhog) Job Shadow Day, a national campaign gives young people a new perspective on their studies through hands-on learning and a one-day mentoring experience. It gives youth a positive experience of the world of work, promote a good work ethic, and develop longer-lasting relationships that contribute to the global economy. It is a joint effort of America’s Promise – Alliance for Youth, Junior Achievement, and the U.S. Department of Labor. Nationwide, more than one million students and 100,000 businesses participate, and more than 2,000 restaurants and hotels hosted nearly 20,000 students. Young people are matched with businesses and professionals so they have first-hand experience about jobs in their fields of interest. SHYLI’s Job Shadow Day helps translate youth passion with practical experience for careers of the future.

About Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative (SHYLI)

Through intensive year-round fellowships, the Sustainable Hawaii Youth Leadership Initiative is training young people with promise to become leaders, initiators of change, who may leave for periods to gain academic and life experience, and return to create opportunities for themselves and their Island communities. SHYLI targets these youth as fellows, and in our experience, many of the connections they gain throughout the sustainability community, through Job Shadow Day, the Youth & Community Leadership Forum, their Sustainability-In-Action project development, their presentations to schools, organizations, businesses greatly benefit everyone – now and in the future. SHYLI is a project of the Stone Soup Leadership Institute has been organizing Job Shadow Day on islands for ten years. Founded on the island of Martha’s Vineyard in 1997, the Institute’s trains young and emerging leaders on Islands. The Institute’s multifaceted educational curriculum, Stone Soup for the World: Life-Changing Stories of Everyday Heroes spotlights 100 heroes who changed their lives by helping their communities. It’s programs foster service learning, entrepreneurship, STEM-thinking, eco-tourism, workforce development, community engagement, global exchanges for best practices of island sustainability. SHYLI is especially committed to helping to build a local green workforce.

~Adapted from press release from SHYLI

 

2014 Legislative Testimony by the Chancellor relating to proposed laser optical communications ground station

UH logo

Testimony Presented Before the
Senate Committee on Public Safety, Intergovernmental and Military Affairs
January 30, 2014 at 3:45 p.m.
by
Donald O. Straney
Chancellor, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

SB 2583 – RELATING TO THE PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL SPACE CENTER FOR EXPLORATION SYSTEMS AND NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION LASER COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION INITIATIVE

Chair Espero, Vice Chair Baker and Members of the Committee:

My name is Donald Straney, Chancellor of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo (UH Hilo). We support the intent of SB 2583 to fund the Pacific International Space Center for Exploration Systems (PISCES) to conduct an engineering assessment for a proposed laser optical communications ground station in Hawaiʻi in partnership with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). We would hope this engineering study is conducted in conjunction with the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa College of Engineering.

This proposal will help to stimulate the growth of our State economy through the development of new innovative technologies that support the creation of high-tech jobs as well as improvements in broadband and optical fiber infrastructure statewide. UH Hilo views the proposal as an opportunity to collaborate with PISCES to provide higher education and career options to the people of our Hawaiʻi Island.

We support SB 2583 provided its passage does not replace or adversely impact priorities in our BOR approved budget.

Thank you for the opportunity to testify on SB 2583. Aloha.

~~~

Chancellor’s testimony on this topic to Senate and House committees:

SB 2583 RELATING TO THE PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL SPACE CENTER FOR EXPLORATION SYSTEMS AND NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION LASER COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION INITIATIVE January 30, 2014
SB 2583 SD1 March 14, 2014
HB 2151 RELATING TO THE PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL SPACE CENTER FOR EXPLORATION SYSTEMS AND NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION LASER COMMUNICATIONS GROUND STATION INITIATIVE February 4, 2014