Cultural Diversity Rubric

Rubric for Cultural Diversity

The use of these Hawaiian terms comes from the story of Nī‘auepo‘o, as documented by Kawena Pukui. It describes the stages of the growth of the niu (coconut) tree that is found in a mele oli (chant) from that story.

Note that these examples are taken from actual student work and are meant to help teachers and students engage in a discussion on what constitutes “growth” in cultural diversity/fluency.

Dimension #1 Kupu (Beginning—the budding of the plant)

Sense of Place (Engagement) Honua Hawai‘i

Exhibits manakā (disinterest), ‘ike ihi (superficial understanding) or ‘ike hemahema (faulty understanding) of Hawai‘i’s people, history and/or landscape.

EX:  “If I owned a beach in Hawai‘i, I should be able to kick everyone off. It’s my private property.”

Sense of Humanity (Respect) Kākou

Expresses a cultural self-centered approach to describing or interacting with others.

EX:  “Muslims obviously hate women for making them wear veils.”

Sense of Others (Empathy) ‘Oukou/Lākou

Descriptions of different cultures and/or social behaviors may reflect some judgmental bias or stereotyping.

EX:  “Allowing gays to marry would be a disaster for this nation.”

Sense of Self (Humility) Au/Mākou

Has a limited understanding oh his/her own cultural and social background.

EX:  “I am just an American, why can’t we all just get along?” or other uncritiqued expressions of self.”

Dimension #2 Mole (Emerging— roots emerge)

Sense of Place (Engagement) Honua Hawai‘i

Exhibits hoihoi (interest) in and ‘ike kumu (basic understanding) of Hawai‘i’s uniqueness.

EX:  “Hawai‘i’s beaches are among the finest in the world but owning one is hard.”

Sense of Humanity (Respect) Kākou

Limited recognition of one’s own biases when describing or interacting with others.

EX:  “I think women need to be liberated from the veil in Iran.”

Sense of Others (Empathy) ‘Oukou/Lākou

Identifies (without judgment) differences in and/or among cultures and social groups.

EX:  “Why New York would allow gays to marry is beyond me.”

Sense of Self (Humility) Au/Mākou

Identifies differing views on his/her own cultural and social backgrounds.

EX:  “Being white in Hawai‘i has its challenges because many people see me as just that—a white person.”

Dimension #3 Kumu (Competent— the forming of the tree)

Sense of Place (Engagement) Honua Hawai‘i

Demonstrates mahalo (appreciation) for and ‘ike pono (clear understanding) of Hawai‘i’s uniqueness as the home of indigenous people, immigrants and immigrant descendants.

EX:  “Hawai‘i’s beaches need to be protected from greedy foreign developers” or “Given the ancient laws, anyone should have access to any beach at any time they want.”

Sense of Humanity (Respect) Kākou

Acknowledges diversity but still exhibits some bias.

EX:  “Muslims have a right to follow their religious principles, but they need to respect women’s rights.”

Sense of Others (Empathy) ‘Oukou/Lākou

Meaningfully expresses social and cultural complexities in and /or among different groups.

EX:  “Gays and lesbians have recently indicated a desire to engage in straight practices such as marriage.”

Sense of Self (Humility) Au/Mākou

Meaningfully expresses how s/he is shaped by diverse cultural and social experiences.

EX:  “I may be white, but I really am a mixture of different backgrounds (my mother was Irish, my father was English).” or “Being Native Hawaiian means recognizing all of my kupuna, some of whom are Japanese and Anglo-American.”

Dimension #4 Hua (Advanced—the ripening of the full fruit)

Sense of Place (Engagement) Honua Hawai‘i

Demonstrates kuleana (responsibility) for and‘ike kū hohonu (sophisticated understanding) of Hawai‘i’s uniqueness as the home of indigenous people, immigrants and immigrant descendants.

EX:  “The Pāpa‘ikou Mill Beach represents an opportunity for dialogue over the complex convergence of private property rights and public access” or “The telescopes on Mauna Kea present a quandary for various stakeholders, including scientists and indigenous activists.”

Sense of Humanity (Respect) Kākou

Expresses a multicultural approach to describing or interacting with others.

EX:  “I am not a Muslim but I respect a culture’s choice in limiting certain types of garment.”

Sense of Others (Empathy) ‘Oukou/Lākou

Demonstrates sophisticated understanding of social and cultural complexities in and/or among different groups.

EX:  “I am straight and I see marriage as a union between man and woman, but I can respect the desire by members of the gay community to undertake such a commitment.”

Sense of Self (Humility) Au/Mākou

Critically analyzes how s/he is shaped by diverse cultural and social experiences.

EX:  “I may be white, but I am a mixture of different backgrounds (my mother was Irish, my father was English)—and these heritages were often at odds with one another over who could rightfully immigrate to America” or “I am a Native Hawaiian who recognizes multiple heritages within my own family, and for this reason, issues  of sovereignty are very complicated.”

 

Download PDF: Cultural Diversity Rubric (Undergraduate)