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UH Hilo Mentorship Program

Each semester, the UH Hilo Mentorship Program matches students with community mentors based on career goals and personal interests. A mentor is someone that works to assist a mentee in reaching their life and career goals. Working one-on-one with a student, mentors assist in exploring a career path and preparing for the transition to postgraduate life. Ideally, the mentor-mentee relationship begins during the student's freshman or sophomore year and continues until graduation or longer.

For any questions regarding the Mentorship Program, please contact Emmeline de Pillis at

Program Guidelines

During the initial reception, students will meet their mentors to discuss individual goals and expectations. The level of involvement in this program will be mutually agreed upon by both partners.

Students and mentors must sign a Mentorship Agreement, which includes a commitment to meet at least once a month. The Office of Applied Learning Experiences (ALEX) will host on-campus luncheons and evening events - announced throughout the semester - to provide further networking opportunities. Upon completion of the program, the Office of Applied Learning Experiences (ALEX) will provide an electronic survey for both students and mentors to complete regarding their respective experiences..


Both mentors and mentees are expected to dedicate 1 hour per month to meet face-to-face at a location of their choosing. In addition to these meetings, the Office of Applied Learning Experiences (ALEX) will host Mentorship Program events at least twice each semester. These events are designed to both bring mentors and mentees together and to provide networking opportunities and promote professional development.

In addition to community mentors, students will be assigned to a peer mentor from their academic discipline with whom they will meet once a month to discuss their academic progress and address any related concerns.

Before applying to the mentorship program, mentors and mentees should reflect on their expectations. Some questions that mentors and mentees should consider when thinking about expectations include:


  • Why do you want to be a mentee?
  • What work-related and interpersonal skills would you like your mentor to have?
  • Do you expect your mentor to help find you an internship or job?
  • How often do you want to meet with your mentor? Where would you like to meet?
  • Are there any specific career planning activities you would like to do with your mentor?


  • Why do you want to be a mentor?
  • What do you see as your role: to lead, to listen, or both?
  • How much time do you have to spend with your mentee?
  • What topics are you comfortable discussing? How can you increase the comfort level of your mentee?
  • Are you willing to have your mentee tour your workplace?
  • What career planning activities would you like to do with your mentee?

Contact Information

Emmeline de Pillis, Ph.D.
Director - Office of Applied Learning Experiences (ALEX)
CoBE Building, Room 108
University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo
Phone: (808) 932-7272