At just $10,000 annual net price, UH Hilo students can prepare themselves for a great diversity of careers in the tropical context, whether government or private sector.

Maria McCarthy handling plants.
UH Hilo student Maria McCarthy performs vegetative propagation on ornamental plants.

The University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo offers one of the top five values in the nation for sustainable agriculture degree programs, according to the online ranking organization CollegeValuesOnline.com. UH Hilo’s bachelor of science in tropical plant sciences and agroecology is ranked fourth of 20 in net price in delivering higher education in sustainable agriculture at an affordable price.

In the ranking, UH Hilo is described as offering “the unique angle of tropical plant sciences for those wishing to labor in tropical zones. At just $10,000 annual net price, students can prepare themselves for a great diversity of careers in the tropical context, whether government or private sector.”

Harald Singer specializes in small breeding cells in honeybees and ways to overcome the Varroa crises.

Harald Singer holds up a honeycomb while standing next to beeboxes.
Harald Singer

SPEAKER: Harald Singer from the University of Vienna, Department of Integrative Zoology.
TITLE OF PRESENTATION: Interactions between honeybees and Varroa mites influenced by cell sizes and hygenic behavior.
DATE: Feb. 12, 2018.
TIME: 9:00 – 10:00 a.m.
PLACE: University Classroom Building, room 127, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (campus map).

Topics include an overview of the law, how it affects local farms and production, and information about important exemptions and scenarios.

Luisa Castro
Luisa Castro

SPEAKER: Luisa Castro, PhD, agricultural food safety program manager for the Hawai‘i Department of Agriculture.
PRESENTATION: “FSMA: What You Should Know,” a presentation on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).
DATE: Friday, February 9, 2018.
TIME: 5:00 p.m.
PLACE: University Classroom Building, room 100, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (campus map).

Using the controversy over genetically-modified foods as its entry point, the film Food Evolution shows how easily fear and misinformation can overwhelm objective, evidence-based analysis. UH Hilo’s Prof. Shintaku weighs in.

Michael Shintaku
Michael Shintaku

Michael Shintaku, a professor of plant pathology at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, is among the many scientists featured in the film Food Evolution that tackles GMO (or genetically modified organisms) in food production. The film includes footage of Hawai’i Island and is narrated by Academy Award nominee Neil deGrasse Tyson.

Dr. Shintaku stated that in 2013, the County of Hawai‘i passed a bill banning transgenic crops (GMOs) from Hawai‘i Island, with certain exceptions (later reversed in federal court). This became a national story, attracting reporters from The New York Times and other media outlets.

Professor Tanabe’s contribution and influence is evidenced by many of his former students who are now entrepreneurial owners, laboratory supervisors, and laboratory technicians in firms involved in tissue culture.

By Christopher Lu, Professor of Animal Science.

Michael Tanabe
Michael Tanabe

It is not an overstatement to say that Professor of Plant Science Michael Tanabe is synonymous to tissue culture in Hawai‘i. If you mention tissue culture in Hawai‘i, many will immediately relate to Mike Tanabe. Professor Tanabe’s contribution and influence is evidenced by many of his former students who are now entrepreneurial owners, laboratory supervisors, and laboratory technicians in firms involved in tissue culture.

After four decades of outstanding service, Professor Michael Tanabe has announced his retirement.

Professor Tanabe is an enthusiastic teacher. He is known to be a meticulous, organized and firm educator. He came to his office early, often before 6:30 a.m. to prepare for his teaching. That has not changed after more than 42 years of teaching.

If anything touches the small stiff hairs in the mouth of a Venus flytrap, the lobes on the plant snap shut, trapping whatever landed in the plant.

By Leilani Blair.

A worm inside the mouth of the plant.
Meal worm in Venus flytrap. Photo by Beatrice Murch via Wikimedia.

This carnivorous plant gathers nutrients from gases in the air and from the soil. The venus flytrap is native in parts of North and South Carolina. When the venus flytrap’s mouth is open wide you can see short hairs, these are called trigger hairs or sensitive hairs. If anything touches these small stiff hairs, the lobes on the plant snap shut, trapping whatever landed in the plant.

The article describes the trends in milk production and consumption.

Christopher Lu
Christopher Lu

Professor Christopher Lu, professor of animal science at the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, published an invited review entitled, “Dairy, Science, Society and Environment,” at the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Environmental Science (July 2017).

“This article describes the trends in milk production and consumption, the debates over the role of milk in human nutrition, the global outlook of organic dairy, the abatement of green-house gas emissions from dairy animals, as well as scientific and technological developments in nutrition, genetics, reproduction, and management in the dairy sector,” explains Lu.

 

Via CAFNRM/Ag Club Newsletter.

The fearless women who run the UH Hilo bee program raise awareness about honey bees as vital pollinators of crops around the island and worldwide.

By Maria McCarthy, Student, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture student, with an animal science track.

Lorna Tsutsumi
Lorna Tsutsumi

Screaming, swatting and running are the common reactions that majority of people have on sighting a bee. Cheryl Yara, Alex Doi, Maria McCarthy and Vanessa Staffer of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, do the opposite. They spend their days getting as close to the honey bees (Apis mellifera) as possible.

“I enjoy giving back to the ‘āina (land) and helping save the honey bees for our future generations to benefit from a crucial insect in our ecosystem,” Yara explains.

Turmeric, Curcuma longa, also known as Curcuma domestica and locally known as ‘olena, has been used for medicinal and culinary purposes for over 4,000 years.

By Maria McCarthy, Student, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, animal science track.

Curcuma longa
The rhizome of Curcuma longa (turmeric, ‘olena). Also known as Curcuma domestica. Harvested on Maui, Jan. 2017. Photo by Forest Starr & Kim Starr via flickr.

The use of plants for medicinal purposes has been practiced since man has walked the earth. The practice has changed over the years, as well as the methods of propagating the plants.

Turmeric, Curcuma longa, also known as Curcuma domestica and locally known as ‘olena, has been used for medicinal and culinary purposes for over 4,000 years. The rhizome is the plant organ that contains all the sought out qualities.

Professor Christopher D. Lu participated in the Chinese Sheep and Goat Association’s 30th Anniversary Conference and the International Goat Association’s Board of Director’s meeting last August.

By Norman Arancon, Associate Professor of Horticulture.

Christopher Lu
Christopher Lu

Professor of Animal Science Christopher Lu was invited to attend the Chinese Sheep and Goat Association Conference held in Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China in August, 2017. The organization celebrated its 33rd anniversary and recognized individuals who made significant contributions to the association. The conference was well attended by about 800 Chinese and international participants.