PRESENTATION: UH Hilo philosophy professor to talk about her new paper on placental ethics, Sept. 26

Celia Bardwell-Jones’s lecture aims to raise awareness about ethical issues surrounding women’s rights to their placentas and to question impacts of current healthcare practices on Hawaiian culture.

Celia Bardwell-Jones
Celia Bardwell-Jones

TALK: Placental Ethics: Addressing Colonial Legacies and Imagining Culturally Safe Responses to Health Care in Hawai‘i.
SPEAKER: Celia Bardwell-Jones, associate professor of philosophy and chair of the gender and women’s studies program at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo.
DATE: Tuesday, September 26, 2017.
TIME: 5:00 to 6:00 p.m.
PLACE: University Classroom Building, room 100, UH Hilo (campus map).

Free and open to the general public and UH community. Light refreshments will be served. Q&A to follow talk.

Sponsored by the UH Hilo Hawai’i Island Philosophy Club, the Gender and Women’s Studies Club, and the Women’s Center.

The talk

Poster for the event with information that can be found in the text of this post.
Click to enlarge.

Associate Professor of Philosophy Bardwell-Jones will talk about her paper, “Placental Ethics: Addressing Colonial Legacies and Imagining Culturally Safe Responses to Health Care in Hawai‘i.” The lecture aims to raise awareness about the ethical issues surrounding women’s rights to their placentas and to question the implications of our current healthcare practices on Hawaiian culture.

The paper is an ethical inquiry in imagining a community oriented health care model that integrates the values of Native Hawaiian culture and modern health care practices. Examining the 2006 placenta controversy in which hospitals held policies that prohibited women from leaving with their placentas after a hospital birth, Bardwell-Jones develops a critical perspective in which the status of the placenta is evaluated from the standpoint of Native Hawaiian culture.

Drawing upon theorists such as epistemologist Manu Meyer (former UH Hilo faculty), ethicist José Medina and philosopher Jane Addams, Bardwell-Jones cultivates an epistemic strategy that aims to bridge the perceived divide between culture and medicine.

Background on the paper

The UH Hilo faculty development program Uluakea supported Bardwell-Jones’s research in exposing her to Native Hawaiian culture through participation in various programs and conferences such as the Native Hawaiian Education Association Conference in 2015. At the 2017 Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy Conference, the paper that she will be presenting won the top essay prize, the Ila and John Mellow Prize, in advancing American Philosophy. The paper is slated to be published in The Pluralist.

Bardwell-Jones has been invited by Rollins College in Florida to present the paper to their students in October.

“I have never presented this work to students and so this talk is in part motivated as offering me a platform to engage students at UH Hilo,” she says.