LECTURE: Evolution, Extinction and Conservation of Hawai‘i’s Birds, Feb. 9

Conservation biologist Rob Fleischer will discuss Hawai‘i’s native birds and DNA methods used to study evolutionary relationships, population genetics, diets, and the impacts and mitigation of introduced disease.

Drawings of Hawaiian birds.
The extinct moa-nalo.

EVENT: A Presentation by Rob Fleischer, Senior Scientist with Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park.
TITLE: Birds of Paradise Lost: Evolution, Extinction and Conservation of Hawai‘i’s Birds.
DATE: Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017.
TIME: 7:00 p.m.
PLACE:  Sciences and Technology Building, room 108, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (campus map).

Summary

Rob Fleischer

Rob Fleischer will discuss Hawai‘i’s native birds, and how he and his colleagues use DNA methods to study the evolutionary relationships, population genetics, diets, and the impacts and mitigation of introduced disease.

Fleischer’s research with the Smithsonian Institution involves application of DNA and genetic analyses to studies in conservation, evolution and animal behavior.  His research often focuses on the use of DNA and genetics to document changes in genetic variation (especially with recently extinct Hawaiian avifauna) and to study the evolutionary interactions between hosts, vectors and infectious disease organisms (such as introduced avian malaria in native Hawaiian birds).

Bio

Rob Fleischer is senior scientist and head of the Center for Conservation and Evolutionary Genetics at Smithsonian’s Conservation Biology Institute. His primary fields of interest are evolutionary and conservation biology. He conducts individual and collaborative research in population and evolutionary genetics, systematics, and molecular and behavioral ecology, mostly on free-ranging bird and mammal species, and their pathogens. Most of his more recent projects use genomic, transcriptomic and microbiome methods. Read full bio.

Sponsors

This lecture is part of the Maunakea Speakers Series of the UH Hilo ‘Imiloa Astronomy Center, the Office of Maunakea Management, and the UH Hilo Department of Physics and Astronomy.