Catalog 2014–2015

English (ENG) Courses

College of Arts and Sciences

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ENG 100  Composition I (3) Instruction and practice in writing clear, effective university-level essays and research paper. Attention to all stages of the process: generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. Pre: ENG 100 on Writing Placement Examination.

ENG 100H  Honors Expository Writing (3) Honors instruction and practice in writing clear, effective university-level essays and research paper. Attention to all stages of the process-generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. Pre: recommendation on Writing Placement Exam, Chancellor's Scholar designation, and instructor's consent.

ENG 100T  Composition with Tutorial (3) Instruction and practice in writing clear, effective university-level essays and research paper. Attention to all stages of the process: generating ideas, drafting, revising, and editing. Attending regular sessions is required. Equivalent to ENG 100 or ESL 100. Pre: ENG 100T on Writing Placement Examination.

ENG 200  Intro to Literary Genres (3) An introduction to major genres in literature. The course will be offered at various times with different focuses: (A) Short Story and Novel; (B) Drama; (C) Poetry; (D) Popular Fiction; (E) Mythology and Folklore; (F) Autobiography; (G) Introduction to Graphic Novels and Comics. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T. (GenEd/IntReq: GH)

ENG 201  Global Cinema (3) A course that offers students a critical examination of worldwide cinema. The course will cover film theory and film making techniques from countries such as Germany, Mexico, China, Senegal, Iran, and India. Students will undertake a critical study of various schools of film as they pertain to these national cinemas as well as explore the cultural and socio-political controversies surrounding cinematography. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as WS 201)

ENG 202  Literature of Human Rights (3) This course will explore narratives from a human rights perspective, beginning in the era shortly before the adoption of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948 and extending into the 21st century. Students will focus on geopolitical conditions that contribute to the suppression of human rights in areas around the globe, including, but not limited to, Chile, India, Nigeria, Iran, the Palestinian Territories, and the United States. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as WS 202)

ENG 204  Intr Race/Gender Film Studies (3) This course will focus on how race and gender historically shape individual and cultural experiences in America, as expressed in film. Key works that offer portrayals by and about various groups (i.e. gays/lesbian, immigrants, indigenous communities, mixed-race populations, etc.) will be critically compared and examined. Students will also discuss and address evolving audience responses to these works. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as WS 204)

ENG 205  Hawaiʻi on Screen (3) A critical look at the development of film in and on Hawaiʻi. The course will cover a number of silent era films as well as the development of the musical and the war story as popular genres in the Islands. The class will also focus on the problems of cultural, racial and gendered representation in mainstream cinematic depictions of Hawaiʻi as well as the contemporary emergence of local and indigenous filmmaking. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (GenEd/IntReq: H/A/P, HPP)

ENG 206  Intro to Popular Culture (3) This course offers an introductory study of mainstream manifestations of culture. Students will critically assess the production, distribution, and consumption of various popular cultural genres, such as advertising, talk shows, sports programs, music videos and gossip magazines and websites, among many others. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as WS 206)

ENG 209  Writing for Business (3) Working from logical and rhetorical principles, this course prepares students to write in the informative, analytical, and persuasive modes required for their major field and in their careers. Intended for students majoring in Business and related fields. Includes a formal research project and report. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T.

ENG 215  Writing for Hum & Soc Sci (3) Develops research skills and further prepares students to do types of source-based writing commonly expected in the humanities and social sciences. Emphasis on writing from logical and rhetorical principles, especially assertion, analysis, and evaluation. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T.

ENG 225  Writng for Sci & Technology (3) Working from logical and rhetorical principles, this course prepares students to write about science and technology in their academic disciplines and careers. Assignments include synthesis, process analysis, and argumentation. Intended for students majoring in the applied and natural sciences. Includes a formal research project and report. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.

ENG 240  British Lit's Greatest Hits (3) Designed for non-English majors and students who are considering majoring in English, this course offers an introduction to British literature from the 16th century to the present. Students will see an overview of British intellectual history and will develop the tools necessary to understand and appreciate great literature as an intellectual and a performance art form. Pre: ENG 100/100T or ESL 100/100T.

ENG 253  World Lit: Class-17th Century (3) World Literature. Major works in translation. Classical to 17th century. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T or instructor's consent.

ENG 254  World Lit: 17th Cent-Present (3) Major works in translation. 254: 17th century to the present. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T or instructor's consent.

ENG 257  Multicultural Literature (3) This is a course designed for students who want to engage literature from various ethnic groups in the U.S. The course includes historical context regarding the production of these literatures, providing an overview of how these groups have developed their own literary techniques, genres, and canons. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as WS 257)

ENG 275  Literature of the Earth (3) Study of how people from a variety of eras and cultures have shaped their responses in poetry, fiction, drama and essays to changes in the natural world. This class will examine issues of globalization and environmental sustainability, with opportunities for research on connections between local and global environmental problems. Pre: ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T. (GenEd/IntReq: GCC)

ENG 285  Intro to News Writing & Report (3) Prepares students to write for newspapers, the internet, and other journalistic outlets. Includes coverage of news conferences, county council meetings, trials, sports, and writing feature stories. Pre: ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T. (Same as COM 285).

ENG 286  Intro to Creative Writing (3) Introduction to the theoretical, practical and artistic concerns of writing vivid and compelling prose fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. Students will be exposed to a range of critical and primary creative writing texts as they produce their own works in each genre. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.

ENG 286A  Intro to Fiction Writing (3) An introduction to the theoretical, practical and artistic concerns of writing vivid and compelling prose fiction. Students will be exposed to a range of critical and primary creative writing texts as they produce their own works. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (GenEd/IntReq: HPP)

ENG 286B  Intro to Poetry Writing (3) An introduction to composing poetic verse. The course will introduce students to basic metrical patterns, rhyme schemes, and forms (including the sonnet, the cinquain, and the villanelle). Students will also undertake a study of key debates in the history of poetry, from both a western and non-western perspective. Pre C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.

ENG 287  Introduction to Rhetoric (3) Survey of rhetorical history, studies and practices from classical to contemporary. Discussion of social, political, legal and ethical aspects of rhetoric and rhetorical theory. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T.

ENG 289  The Rhetoric of Food (3) A course designed for students interested in learning how and why food plays a central role in cultures around the world. Attention will be paid to how food affects political, religious, economic, social and cultural activities and decision-making in various countries/regions. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.

ENG 290  Literature and Medicine (3) English 290 provides students with the opportunity to study writers, poets, and artists confronting timeless issues dealing with the human body. The class will look at how and why novels, short stories, poems, plays and film cover the wide range of biological human conditions, from disease to sexuality to mortality. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T.

ENG 300  Intro to Literary Studies (3) Introduces majors to the methods of research, analysis, close reading and argumentation that are essential to the successful reading of and writing about literature. Included is a comprehensive survey of literary terms, key concepts, literary forms and genres. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T, and ENG 200 (A-F) and one additional 200-level writing or literature class (with exception of ENG 209 and ENG 225) or instructor's consent.

ENG 302  Studies in Myth and Folklore (3) A critical, comparative study of myth and folklore, which provides students with knowledge and analytical perspectives on the way various oral traditions inform English literature, past and present. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 304  Survey of British Lit I (3) Survey of British Literature, Middle Ages to Enlightenment. Pre: C or better in ENG 300.

ENG 305  Survey of British Lit II (3) Survey of British Literature, Romantics to the Present. Pre: C or better in ENG 300.

ENG 314  Journalism (3) Principles of journalism with emphasis on newspaper reporting. Methods of news gathering, writing and editing, research, interviewing, rewriting news releases, and covering campus events and beats. Pre: ENG 100, 100T, ESL 100 or 100T, or instructor's consent.

ENG 315  Advanced Composition (3) Writing of essays with an emphasis on rhetorical and stylistic methods, structure, and voice. Pre: ENG 100, 100T, ESL 100 or 100T and one of the following: ENG 209, 215, 225 or 287.

ENG 318  Playwriting (3) Writing one-act plays for the stage and for radio. Examining and applying the requirements and uniqueness of writing for the stage-play and for the radio-drama. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T. (Same as DRAM 318)

ENG 321  Morphology And Syntax (3) Introduction to grammatical analysis and theory; practical experience in solving problems in morphology and syntax, using data drawn from a wide variety of languages. Pre: LING 102 or instructor's consent. (Same as ANTH 321, LING 321).

ENG 323  The Literature of Hawaiʻi (3) A critical analysis of the history of literature in the Hawaiian Islands. Study will touch upon the politicization of the Hawaiian language, the insider/outsider debate, the emergence of local literature, and ethnic/racial divides in contemporary discussions of literary craft and study. Class will include oral narratives (chants, hula), expatriate literature (Bingham, London, Michener), and a wide range of local texts. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. (GenEd/IntReq: H/A/P, GCC, HPP)

ENG 324  Modern English Grammar & Usage (3) The fundamentals of English morphology and syntax, conventions of written and spoken English, and sociolinguistic aspects of major English registers and dialects. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, ESL 100T, and LING 102 or LING 121, or instructor's consent. (Same as LING 324).

ENG 345  Children & Literature (3) Literature in English for and by children, with special emphasis on the ways in which literature promotes social, emotional, and intellectual development. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, ESL 100T or instructor's consent.

ENG 347  Pidgins And Creoles (3) A study of the world's pidgins and creoles with special reference to the Pacific region; the origin and nature of pidgins and creoles; the relationship between Hawaiʻi Creole English to other Creoles in the world. The link between the development of a Creole and language acquisition. Recommended: LING 102 or 121. (Same as ANTH/LING 347). (GenEd/IntReq: H/A/P)

ENG 350  Second Lang Acquisition Theory (3) Current research and theories of learning a second or additional language from social, psychological and linguistic perspectives. Topics include the attainment of communicative competence, the critical period hypothesis, focus on form, individual learning styles, and learner autonomy. The emphasis is on how the knowledge of second language acquisition theory helps improve the quality of classroom language teaching. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T or ESL 100, ESL 100T and LING 102 or instructor's consent. (Same as LING 350)

ENG 351  Amer Lit: to the Civil War (3) American literature to the Civil War. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 352  Amer Lit: Civil War-Pres (3) American literature from the Civil War to the present. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 355  Women in Modern Lit & Film (3) Literature and film by and about women from 1900 to the present. Feminist literary theory. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T, and a 200-level literature course or college-level Women's Studies course, or instructor's consent. (Same as WS 355).

ENG 356  Language and Gender (3) Students engage in the analysis of gender as it relates to language and society. Provides students with analytic resources for thinking critically about the relationship between language and social practice. Students gather and analyze data based on current theories. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100, or ESL 100T and LING 102, or instructor's consent. (Same as LING/WS 356)

ENG 364  Chnse Lit in Eng-Modern (3) Survey of major Chinese writings from 1919 to the present. Knowledge of Chinese is not required. Pre: ENG 100, 100T, ESL 100, or 100T or instructor's consent. (Same as CHNS 364).

ENG 365  Japanese Lit in English (3) Survey of major works from earliest times to the present. Knowledge of Japanese is not required. (Same as JPST 365). (GenEd/IntReq: H/A/P, HPP)

ENG 366  Utopia in Literature (3) A study of the "Utopian" theme in literature, from Plato's Republic to the modern science fiction novel. Pre: ENG 100, 100T, ESL 100, or 100T and a 200-level literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENG 370  Advanced Film Studies (3) Students undertake a study of film/editing techniques, genres, and critical theories that influence the production and analyses of film and film-making. This course builds upon 200-level film classes in English. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. Recommended: ENG 201, 204, 205, or 206.

ENG 371  Topics in Contemporary Lit (3) The development of contemporary fiction, poetry and drama concentrating upon representative works from 1945 to the present. This course may be taken twice provided that different topics are studied. The letter suffix indicates the topic. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 387  Lit of the Environment (3) A study of modern nature writing and environmental issues in several genres. Students will explore how humans negotiate their place in a variety of physical environments. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T or ESL 100, ESL 100T and ENG 251, 252, 253 or 254 or instructor’s consent.

ENG 400  Topics in Classical Literature (3) Studies in Greek and Roman literature from various perspectives (historical, cultural, social). May be offered by genre or theme. May be repeated for credit provided a different topic is studied. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 418  American Women Writers (3) This course will acquaint students with a variety of writings by women in the Americas. In addition to literary analysis, texts will be viewed in cultural, historical and theoretical contexts. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 419  Adv Topics in American Lit (3) A course which involves critical analysis of key periods and/or themes in American Literature, ranging from the Transcendentalists to the Beats. The course may also explore major ethnic canons, such as Native American, Chicano/a, Asian American, and African American. The course may be repeated, provided that different topics are studied. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 422  ESL Teaching Practicum (3) A course requiring students to engage in supervised teaching in an authentic classroom setting with actual learners of ESL. Provides the student with opportunities to observe, describe, interpret and understand the classroom environment and to reflect on the personal and professional attributes required for success in teaching. Students design and implement their own lesson plans and analyze and reflect on the classroom environment in relation to current research. Pre: LING 102, 121 or 331, ENG/LING 324, 350, ENG 484.

ENG 423  Post-Colonial Literature (3) A critical analysis of the development of contemporary world literature in the wake of the fall of European empires. This class is designed to address the importance of writing in an age of changing national identities, shifting alliances, and volatile conflicts. Texts from Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, the Caribbean, and Hawaiʻi will be featured. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. (Same as WS 423).

ENG 431  Fiction Writing (3) Advanced study and writing seminar in fiction. Students may repeat for credit (maximum 6 credits). Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. Offered Spring semester only.

ENG 432  Non-Fiction Writing (3) Advanced study and writing seminar in non-fiction. Students may repeat for credit (maximum 6 credits). Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. Offered Fall semester only.

ENG 433  Poetry Writing (3) Advanced study and writing seminar in poetry. Student may repeat for credit (maximum 6 credits). Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 442  Romantic Literature (3) Poetry and prose from 1780 to 1832. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. (Same as WS 422).

ENG 445  Victorian Literature (3) Poetry and prose from 1832 to 1900. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 448  Graphic Novels and Comics (3) Advanced study of major developments, schools and styles in contemporary graphic novels and comics. Emphasis on literary theory and analysis. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 on instructor's consent.

ENG 461  Shakespeare (3) Selected histories, comedies, and tragedies not studied in ENG 462. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T and a 200-level literature course, or instructor's consent.

ENG 462  Shakespeare II (3) The study of selected histories, comedies, and tragedies, with emphasis on performance choices as they determine, and are determined by, varying interpretations. Most plays studied in ENG 462 will differ from those studied in ENG 461. When the approach is different in the two courses, a play may be studied in both. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T, and any college-level literature or drama class, or instructor's consent.

ENG 464  Modern Literature (3) British and American literature from 1900 to WWII with emphasis on the development of Literary Modernism. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 465  Post-Modern Literature (3) A study of literature (including theoretical essays, plays, film, and poetry) following WWII. The course will address contemporary responses to and against the Modernist Period and may cover movements such as Literature/Theatre of the Absurd, Magical Realism, the San Francisco Renaissance, the Black Mountain Poets, and the Angry Young Men's Movement. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 466  The Contemporary Fairy Tale (3) A study of a representative range of contemporary fairy tales in English, which incorporates current theories and analytical approaches to literary fairy tales and the politics of interpretation. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 469  Advanced Topics in Film (3) A course that analyzes advanced theoretical approaches to film and/or stage. The course may explore themes, such as film noir or 3rd Cinema. The course may be repeated, provided that different topics are studied. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 475  Topics in Literary Criticism (3) Advanced analyses of literature via specific schools of theoretical criticism, such as Psychoanalysis, Deconstruction, Marxism and New Criticism. The course may be repeated for credit, provided that a different topic is chosen. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 480  Women and Rhetoric (3) Survey of key female figures that have figured (or not figured) into the rhetorical canon. Analysis of women's use of rhetoric in everyday life and at historic moments and consideration of methodological and theoretical issues intersecting women, rhetoric and historical research. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent. (Same as WS 480).

ENG 482  Teaching Composition (3) Overview of current theory and research informing contemporary English composition instruction at elementary, secondary, and college levels with methods for application to teaching or writing at any level or within any discipline. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 483  Modern/Contemporary Drama (3) A study of works which have established or refined major traditions in modern theater, with some reading in critical theory. Pre: C of better in ENG 100, ENG 100T or ESL 100, ESL 100T and 200-level coursework in literature. (Same as DRAM 483).

ENG 484  ESL Materials & Methods (3) Overview of current theory and practice in the teaching of English as a Second Language. In addition to studying and evaluating various theoretical approaches to ESL teaching and second-language learning, students will gain experience developing and using their own teaching materials. Pre: C or better in ENG 100, ENG 100T, ESL 100 or ESL 100T and ENG/LING 350, or instructor's consent.

ENG 485  World Wide Web Writing: Praxis (3) Introduction and practice in concepts of writing for the World Wide Web, including document design, web publishing, designing, and evaluating web documents. Hands-on HTML, XHTML, and how to build, launch, and maintain a web page for non-computer science students. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 486  Applied Professional Writing (3) Preparation and practice in professional writing in real work settings. Includes planning, executing, and analyzing a writing project in the community. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 488A  Single Author Pre-1700 (3) A semester long consideration of the literary output of a single author selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit provided that a different topic is studied. Credit may be earned in each different period A) Pre-1700; B) Post-1700. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 488B  Single Author Post-1700 (3) A semester-long consideration of the literary output of a single author selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit provided that a different topic is studied. Credit may be earned in each different period: (A) Pre-1700; (B) Post-1700. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 489  Major Literary Movements (3) Advanced senior-level studies of schools and movements not covered by the Department's current British Literature offerings or by ENG 419. Possible topics include Realism and Naturalism, the Bengali Renaissance, Avant-Garde and the Era of the Decadents, the Celtic Revival, and Magic Realism. The course may be repeated, provided that different topics are studied. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 490  WWW Theory & Rhetoric (3) Considers composition and rhetoric in relation with technology and the Internet. Discussion of social, political, legal, and ethical aspects of writing for the World Wide Web. Focus on theory and rhetoric. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.

ENG 492  Teaching Literature (3) A course that covers the praxis of teaching literature as well as the theory surrounding literary studies. Students will learn to create creative and analytical exercises and critically evaluate and utilize a wide range of resources for the teaching of poetry and prose at the secondary and post-secondary level. Pre: C or better in ENG 300 or instructor's consent.


ENG x94 Special Topics in Subject Matter (Arr.) (IO) Special topics chosen by the instructor. Course content will vary. May be repeated for credit, provided that a different topic is studied. Additional requirements may apply depending on subject and topic.

ENG x99 Directed Studies (Arr.) (IO) Statement of planned reading or research required. Pre: instructor’s consent.

Undergraduate Courses