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Tag: UH Hilo Community

Message from UH President Lassner: Update on UH Hilo Chancellor search

The search committee expects to conduct campus visits with finalists at the start of the fall 2018 semester to ensure full campus input before a selection is made.

Dear UH Hilo faculty, staff, students and administrators—

David Lassner
David Lassner

In December 2017, we announced that the search for the next chancellor of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo began. A 16-member search committee was formed comprised of faculty, staff, students and community members and is co-chaired by Farrah-Marie Gomes, UH Hilo vice chancellor for student affairs, and Vassilis Syrmos, UH System vice president for research and innovation.

When we announced the search, we also noted that a professional search firm would be assisting with the process and we were concluding our efforts to competitively select a firm. The updated job announcement was posted in January with review to begin at the end of February. We hoped to expeditiously identify the next chancellor, who will play a critical role in strengthening UH Hilo’s unique position in the state and beyond, with my recommendation to the Board of Regents this summer.

The search committee has been moving the process along to meet this timeline. However, due to unexpected delays, a finalized agreement with the search firm is not yet in place. So as the semester comes to a close, and in consultation with the chairs who have discussed with the search committee, we are backing off this aggressive schedule to ensure that the search firm is onboard and fully engaged in assisting us identify the best possible candidates. We now expect to conduct campus visits with finalists at the start of the fall 2018 semester to ensure full campus input before a selection is made. This will still allow for a new chancellor to start in the spring 2019 time frame.

As our search continues, I appreciate the leadership of Interim Chancellor Sakai during this current academic year. I will also be making a recommendation to the Board of Regents to continue her appointment as interim chancellor until the new chancellor begins.

David Lassner

Hawaiian Healing Arts workshop for faculty and staff, May 3

To successfully create a culture of mental and emotional wellness for students on campus, faculty and staff are encouraged to create a culture of emotional wellness for themselves.

Dane  Kaohelani Silva
Dane  Kaohelani Silva

The University of Hawai’i at Hilo Suicide Prevention Committee and Counseling Services invites all faculty and staff to a Lomi Noho  (seated massage) and Hawaiian Healing Arts workshop by Kumu Dane  Kaohelani Silva sponsored by the Chancellor’s Professional Development Fund.

To successfully create a culture of mental and emotional wellness for students on campus, faculty and staff are encouraged to create a culture of emotional wellness for themselves.

DATE: May 3, 2018
TIME: 1:00 to  2:30 p.m.
PLACE: Campus Center, room 306.

This experiential workshop will include instruction on partner lomi noho (seated massage) as well as information about Hawaiian healing arts for self-care. Kumu Dane will introduce three local plants that are used by kanaka maoli (indigenous people) to preserve health and prevent pehupehu (chronic inflammation). They may be applied by participants during this session.

Bio

Kumu Dane Kaohelani Silva was born and raised in Hilo, Hawai’i Island. He grew up in the Hawaiian community of Keaukaha. During his youth, he was trained in healing and martial arts by native experts.

Educated in Hawai’i and the mainland, he completed a long career in academia, military and clinical practice. A leader in the field of integrative healthcare, he continues to promote the practice of  self-care as the foundation for family and community health.

Kumu Dane is currently developing herbal products for self-care and home care. Using medicinal plants from the garden, these oils and creams are designed to offer relief from pain, swelling and loss of function.

Information

For more information or disability accommodation contact Counseling Services.

General info about Counseling Services for staff and faculty.

Reservations

Participation is limited, RSVP online.

Lecture on diversity and multiculturalism by visiting scholar Gary Okihiro, May 2

The Chancellor’s Diversity Committee invites the university community and the general public to attend a talk by a nationally acclaimed scholar, founder and teacher of Asian American and comparative ethnic studies.

 

Gary Okihiro
Gary Okihiro

SPEAKER: Gary Y. Okihiro, PhD.
TITLE: “Diversity and its Discontents: How Multiculturalism Failed Us.”
DATE: Wednesday, May 2, 2018.
TIME: 5:00-6:00 p.m.
PLACE: University Classroom Building, room 100, University of Hawai‘i at Hilo (campus map).

Free and open to the UH community and the general public. Light refreshments will be served.

Bio

Gary Y. Okihiro, PhD, is a visiting professor of American Studies at Yale University, a professor of international and public affairs at Columbia University, and the founding director of Columbia’s Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race. He has taught, directed and developed the comparative ethnic studies programs at Humboldt State University, Santa Clara University, and Cornell University.

Prof. Okihiro is the author of 14 books, and his research focuses on the United States (including Hawaiʻi) southern Africa, Asian studies and world history. He is the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Studies Association and Association for Asian American Studies, received an honorary doctorate degree from the University of the Ryukyus (Okinawa), and is a past president of the Association for Asian American Studies.

Sponsors

The talk is sponsored by the UH Hilo Chancellor’s Diversity Committee and the Droste Bequest.

Contact

Contact Patsy Iwasaki for more information or auxiliary aids/special accommodations to participate.

Interim Chancellor’s Monthly Column: Come celebrate Hōkūleʻa visiting Hilo this month

UH Hilo will be hosting a day-long event for Hōkūleʻa, the crew, and the local community on Saturday, April 21.

By Marcia Sakai.

The Hōkūleʻa is visiting Hawai‘i Island for a two-month stay that started in March. This is the voyaging canoe’s first visit to our island since embarking from Hilo in May 2014 for the three-year Malama Honua Worldwide Voyage.

Hōkūleʻa and crew will be stopping at several ports on the island starting with Miloliʻi, then Kailua-Kona, Hilo, and Kawaihae before heading back to O‘ahu in May. The Hawaiʻi Island visit is an official stop on the “Hōkūleʻa Mahalo, Hawaiʻi Sail” trip throughout the islands as a way for the crew to say thank you for all the support shown by the people of Hawai‘i during the worldwide voyage.

The importance of Hōkūleʻa and the worldwide voyage is significant. The Hawaiian name for the voyage, Mālama Honua, means “to care for our Earth.” The purpose of the trip was to share with the world the understanding that our island chain teaches us that our natural world is in need of our stewardship if we are to survive together.

The University of Hawai‘i was the higher education partner in the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage, with over 50 people from all 10 campuses directly involved, providing the manpower and resources to execute the voyage. Countless UH students, faculty, staff and alumni served during the three-year voyage in myriad ways, as volunteers, navigators, captains and scientific researchers.

We’re proud to be part of the worldwide voyage through the many people from the UH Hilo ‘ohana who participated. Master navigator Kālepa Baybayan, a UH Hilo alumnus and navigator in residence at ʻImiloa Astronomy Center, has been part of the Polynesian voyaging renaissance since 1975 at the age of 19, and served on the worldwide voyage as both crew and captain on various legs of the journey such as New Zealand, Australia, South Africa, U.S. East Coast. Notably, he captained the Hōkūleʻa’s historic sail to Washington D.C.

Others from our ‘ohana, too, far too many to name here—Heinani Enos, a lecturer with Ka Haka ‘Ula O Ke‘elikōlani College of Hawaiian Language, and Kaleo Pilago who at the time of his participation was a student development specialist at the Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center. All sailed on the voyage and then spent time with stakeholders from across the UH System to discuss next steps forward.

Celebrating Hōkūleʻa

UH Hilo shares in the vision of Mālama Honua—as an indigenous serving institution, we take our kuleana, our responsibility, to protect cultural and environmental resources for our children’s future, very seriously.

The voyage sought to engage all the world’s people to bridge traditional and new technologies to live sustainably. This is also a high priority of the UH System and UH Hilo in particular, and we share with Hōkūleʻa, the crew, and the Polynesian Voyaging Society, the connection and understanding of the important work being done here in the islands to care for Earth and our unique culture.

At each stop on our island this month, the crew of the Hōkūleʻa, including many from UH Hilo, will be giving presentations and talk story sessions, canoe tours, volunteer stewardship opportunities and other family-friendly events, all free to the public. The Polynesian Voyaging Society will also be hosting thousands of public and private school students with canoe visits and educational activities that highlight wayfinding and voyaging through the perspectives of math, science, conservation and culture.

In celebration of this shared vision for a sustainable future, UH Hilo will be hosting a day-long event for Hōkūleʻa, the crew, and the local community on Saturday, April 21. We anticipate a large turnout and hope to share with our local communities the importance of the Mālama Honua Voyage as well as the many related educational programs at UH Hilo. There will be exhibitions and informational displays and lots of hands-on activities and fun takeaways for the keiki.

There are a number of other events planned around the Hōkūleʻa visit to our island. One of these is a field trip of 200 students from Kaumana Elementary School who will visit the UH Hilo Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center in Keaukaha as part of a day-long educational event. The center will be giving the students and their teachers tours of the aquaculture research and educational facility, inspiring keiki to pursue science and dedicate their lives to the preservation of the ocean and our island home.

I hope you’ll join us on April 21 to welcome and celebrate the Hōkūleʻa and crew, as we honor them as cultural treasures and worldwide ambassadors of our island home.

Aloha,

Marcia Sakai

Are you worried about one of our students? Faculty and staff are encouraged to do online simulation exercise

A Message from University of Hawai‘i at Hilo Counseling Services: Faculty and staff can take small steps that make a big difference to support students when they need it the most.

Health and wellnes programs logo with lehua flower.Our students face increasing pressures that can lead to emotional distress, depression, anxiety, substance abuse, and even thoughts of suicide. As faculty and staff, we can take small steps that make a big difference to support our students when they need it the most.

With the support of The Chancellor’s Professional Development Fund, Counseling Services and the UH Hilo Suicide Prevention Committee have adopted an online conversation simulation, “Kognito At-Risk for Faculty & Staff,” to help us learn to notice signs of distress, use techniques to discuss our concerns, and, if necessary, refer students to appropriate resources.

At-Risk for Faculty & Staff lets you practice these challenging conversations at your own pace through role-play with virtual students. In a national study of effectiveness, this simulation has been shown to increase the number of student referrals to counseling. It is also listed in the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s Best Practices Registry and under review for inclusion in the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices.

To do online simulation exercise

1. Go to online Kognito website.

2. Create a new account.

3. Use enrollment key: uhilof

4. Launch At-Risk for Faculty & Staff

This short 30-45 min training can be completed in multiple sittings and your progress will be saved. You may need to unblock pop-ups in your browser for the simulation to open. Please note that UH Hilo has a Care Team in place of a BIT Team.

“This is a really, really great training resource. The dialogue and content are very apropos to this population group… I think this is a perfect way for faculty, staff, and student peers to learn about conversational strategies to identify and refer a student in distress. I hope that others have, or intend to view this resource before its closure date.” —UH Hilo Faculty

Kognito Workshop Training & Discussion 

Dates:

  • Monday, March 12, 10:00-11:00 a.m.
  • Wednesday, March 14, 1:00-2:00 p.m.
  • Thursday, March 15, 9:00-10:00 a.m.
  • Thursday, March 15, 12:30-1:30 pm

Place: University Classroom Building, room 102

RSVP online by Friday, March 9, 2018.

Contact

If you have any questions or concerns or if you would like fliers, contact Emily Low.

Counseling Services and the UH Hilo Suicide Prevention Committee.

Suicide Prevention Lifeline 1-800-273-8255.

Crisis Text Line 741-741.

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