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Tag: Community Outreach

2018 Fall Food Drive underway

Non-perishable food items and monetary donations are being accepted and will be donated to the Hawai‘i Island Food Basket

Words: Food Basket Inc, Hawaii Island Food Bank. Against green image of breadfruit.The Fall Food Drive is underway at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. The event, hosted by the the Campus and Community Service program is happening from Oct. 29 through Nov. 14, 2018.

Non-perishable food items are accepted and will be donated to the Hawai‘i Island Food Basket. The UH Hilo goal is to raise $550.00 and collect 350 lbs of food. As of Nov. 2, $115.50 and 46.2 lbs of food has been collected.

Food donations can be left at the following locations on campus:

  • Campus Center, room 210
  • School of Education in University Classroom Building, room 313
  • Division of Student Affairs office in Student Services Center, room W-306
  • Performing Arts Center Box Office
  • Athletics Office
  • Mookini Library

Monetary donations can be made at the Campus Center Sodexo Dining Hall at each of the registers or online. Online donations should include the notation “TO UH HILO” in the memo so that it will count towards UH Hilo totals. Checks can also be made, payable to “Hawaii Island Food Basket”—the Campus Community Service office will provide pick up of checks (send an email request for pick up).

Hunger Banquet

The campus community is invited to the Hunger Banquet on Nov. 8, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., in Campus Center, room 301. The event highlights the disparity in access to food and resources globally.

Contact

Campus Community Service office.

Interim Chancellor’s Monthly Column: UH Hilo, a leader in diversity

Our campus’s cultural diversity provides an environment in which appreciation for diversity of perspectives can create a healthy community where everyone feels respected and valued.

Large group, Freshman class.
UH Hilo’s Fall 2018 Freshman Class gather on the Campus Center Plaza during Orientation Week, Aug, 15, 2018. In August, The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2018 Almanac ranked UH Hilo as the most diverse four-year public university in the nation. Courtesy photo from the Freshman Experience Program, click to enlarge.

October is Global Diversity Awareness Month and the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo has much to celebrate. Our campus prides itself on being an inclusive community, nurturing and supporting a global mix of ethnicities and cultures. In August, The Chronicle of Higher Education’s 2018 Almanac ranked UH Hilo as the most diverse four-year public university in the nation! Three other UH campuses also ranked in the top 10.

Our campus’s cultural diversity provides an environment in which appreciation for diversity of perspectives can create a healthy community where everyone feels respected and valued. This is enriching for everyone on campus. But it’s even more than that.

Having local, mainland, Pacific region and other international students all living and learning together gives everyone real experience in the development of global understanding. Students leave our campus and community with a strong sense of the value of diversity in education, commerce, health and welfare—our graduates are already global citizens before graduation, with an understanding that valuing diversity raises the quality of life for everyone.

Let me share something about our people and programs working in support of diversity at UH Hilo.

First, we embrace our responsibility to serve the indigenous people of Hawai‘i and to support Hawai‘i’s indigenous language and culture. Hawai‘i’s people, history, cultures, and natural environment permeate all that we do in teaching, conducting research, and doing outreach to the community.

In addition to our Hawaiian language and cultural revitalization programs, cultural practitioners are part of many programs in the natural sciences, pharmaceutical and health sciences, humanities, and sustainability. Cultural practitioners at our Uluākea program teach faculty in various academic disciplines an authentic and practical understanding of indigenous ways of knowing the world.

Group of people some blowing conch shells.
Cultural practitioners at our Uluākea program teach faculty in various academic disciplines an authentic and practical understanding of indigenous ways of knowing the world. Courtesy photo.

It is from this strong place-based foundation that our campus embraces the world, its peoples and its cultures.

In academics, Professor of Sociology Marina Karides is developing a new track of study focusing on island and indigenous sociology. The curriculum includes courses on indigenous health and well-being, island feminism, and the political economy of Hawai‘i. Students’ theses will be based in indigenous research protocols, and internships will be required with organizations that serve Native Hawaiian and/or indigenous communities.

Through the Study Abroad program, headed by Director of Global Exchange Carolina Lam, our local students have many opportunities to study in another country, giving them real world experience of other cultures and people. Students who study abroad gain valuable skills and expertise for an increasingly internationalized and interdependent world.

Anya Benevides by lake, snow and snow capped mountains in distance.
UH Hilo exchange student Anya Benevides, Narvik, Norway. Courtesy photo.

On campus, UH Hilo hosts incoming exchange students from different nations and cultures each semester in a program headed by Director of Global Exchange Tom Shumway. Almost 100 new international exchange and other international students have joined us this fall—of those about 30 are exchange students with us for one or two semesters and the others degree seeking. About 250 total international students are on campus. Along with international films and speakers, these students present opportunities for an enriched understanding of diverse viewpoints and experiences that benefit our classrooms, our campus, and the greater Hilo community.

Group of people, the host family and their young daughter with students.
The Matsui Family of Hilo is a host family to UH Hilo international students. (Left to right) student La-Arnie Lucky, student Niah Maui, Savannah Matsui, Erin Matsui, Kent Matsui, and student Ngiratkel Singeo. Read story about the Host Family Program welcome event hosted earlier this semester. Courtesy photo, click to enlarge.

At our Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, Director Jennifer Stotter is looking at diversity on campus from the perspective of equity. In addition to ensuring that UH Hilo is following all laws and policies pertaining to equal opportunity, the EEO/AA office also develops training programs and workshops on sexual harassment and discrimination to ensure all on our campus are supported and treated fairly.

LGBTQ+ Center logo, rainbow heart with words: LGBTQ+ Center University of Hawaii at HiloAt our Division of Student Affairs, Vice Chancellor Farrah-Marie Gomes is looking at developing a Center for Diversity and Multiculturalism to bring together all the programs that currently support diversity, including the Center for Global Education and Exchange, the Minority Access and Achievement Program, the Student Support Services Program, the Womenʻs Center, the LGBTQ+ Center, Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center, and others. The centralization will allow for even more coordination and collaboration between people and programs in support of our diverse campus community.

We look forward to doing more, because this is the type of support that expands our students’ views about people, their diverse communities and the world as they become global citizens and move on to become the leaders of the future.

Diversity Fair

UH Hilo will be celebrating Global Diversity Awareness Month on campus with a Diversity Fair on Oct. 24. There will be student presentations, artwork, music, food, and performance art, all celebrating diversity. The different programs mentioned in this column will also have displays and information booths. An awards ceremony will cap the event recognizing the best student presentations. All are welcome, the event is free and open to the public. I hope you’ll join us.

Aloha,

Marcia Sakai

UH Hilo Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai meets with local press

Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai hosted a Coffee Hour with the local press today on the campus of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. Interim Chancellor Sakai shared the following information in her PowerPoint.

The Flow

Large group of students and staff in orange safety vests, some hollding drones and other equipment.
UH HILO DRONE TEAM. UH Hilo had a vital role in response to the recent historic lava eruption on Hawaiʻi Island. In the photo above, students and staff, four holding drones used in aerial surveys, in the field at recent lava flow in Puna. The team piloted drones day and night to capture thermo data and imagery of lava flows, information critical to government agencies overseeing eruption response. They also analyzed threat to Puna Geothermal. Other teams of scientists analyzed chemistry of lava samples at labs on campus. Courtesy photo, click to enlarge.

UH Hilo Most Diverse Four-Year University in the Nation

Large group of students looking up to camera.
Freshman class during Orientation in August 2018. Courtesy photo, click to enlarge.

UH Hilo was recently ranked the Most Diverse 4-Year University in the Nation by the Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac 2018.

The Chronicle’s ranking of the top 10 most diverse public four-year universities and their corresponding diversity indexes:

  1. UH Hilo, 88.9
  2. Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology at Okmulgee, 87.1
  3. UH Maui College, 86.5
  4. UH West Oʻahu, 84.5
  5. Highline College, 81.9
  6. UH Mānoa, 81.6
  7. California State University, East Bay, 79.3
  8. Rutgers University-Newark, 78.9
  9. New Jersey Institute of Technology, 78.5
  10. Seattle Central College, 78.0

Fundraiser held to benefit lava rescue horses and mini donkey now housed at UH Hilo Farm

Bentos for Bob-Bob: The benefit is a partnership with UH Hilo, Chef Alan Wong, the Adopt-A-Beehive with Alan Wong program, and Sodexo Dining Services.

Alan Wong and Marcia Sakai.
Chef Alan Wong (left) and Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai with Bob-Bob, a miniature donkey rescued during the recent lava flow in Puna and now housed at the UH Hilo Agricultural Farm Laboratory along with 22 rescue horses. Photo taken outside the UH Hilo College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management, Sept. 24, 2018. Raiatea Arcuri/UH Hilo Stories.
Alan Wong and Marcia Sakai.
Alan Wong looks on while Marcia Sakai feeds Bob-Bob. Photo by Alyson Kakugawa-Leong, click to enlarge.

Interim Chancellor Marcia Sakai attended a fundraiser today to benefit a community outreach project at the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management. The “Bento Benefit for Bob-Bob” raised $2,500 to help support University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s equine program to fund medication, horse supplements, and veterinary care for horses at UH Hilo’s Agricultural Farm Laboratory in Pana‘ewa.

In May 2018, with the Kilauea eruption in Puna, 22 horses and the mini-donkey Bob-Bob were displaced from their homes and fostered at the UH Hilo Farm. Their care has been provided by UH Hilo pre-veterinary students and volunteers.

The benefit is a partnership with UH Hilo, Chef Alan Wong, the Adopt-A-Beehive with Alan Wong program, and Sodexo Dining Services. The UH Hilo farm is home to the apiary that is central to Alan Wong’s Adopt-a-Beehive Program.

Bentos were pre-sold and picked up on campus today where Bob-Bob was on hand to thank everyone in person.

Chef Alan Wong, Reid Kusano, and Dylan Sugimoto.
(Left to right) Chef Alan Wong and Sodexo’s Reid Kusano thank Dylan Sugimoto, a senior, as he picks up his bento Sept. 24 on the UH Hilo campus. Raiatea Arcuri/UH Hilo Stories.