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Tag: Collaborations & Partnerships

Kamehameha Schools delegation tours site of new College of Hawaiian Language building

Kamehameha
A delegation from Kamehameha Schools stands with UH Hilo officials at the construction site of Haleʻōlelo, Hilo’s new College of Hawaiian Language facilities. (Left to right) Handley Null, Jacobsen Construction project manager; Mariko Miho, UH Foundation senior director of development for regional and community colleges; Stacy Clayton, Kamehameha Schools director of the extension education division; Brandon Ledward, Kamehameha Schools director of the ‘āina-based education department; Don Straney, UH Hilo chancellor; Matt Platz, UH Hilo vice chancellor for academic affairs; Andrea Furuli, UH Hilo development office interim director.
Hale
Rendering of Haleʻōlelo, the new College of Hawaiian Language facilities currently under construction.

Nine members of the Kamehameha Schools Extension Education Services Division visited the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo campus on March 4. The intent of the visit was to hear about what UH Hilo is doing to recruit, retain and graduate Native Hawaiian students, to learn more about partnership efforts that exists with Kamehameha Schools, and to explore new collaborative opportunities.

UH Hilo Chancellor Don Straney hosted the event. Presentations were made by faculty, staff and students representing Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language, Nā Pua Noʻeau Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children, and the Pacific Internship Programs for Exploring Science.

The skylight is the "piko" or the center of the new College of Hawaiian Language building.
The skylight is the “piko” or the center of the new College of Hawaiian Language building.

Gail Makuakāne-Lundin, interim executive assistant to the chancellor, presented an overview of Hawaiʻi Papa O Ke Ao, the UH system initiative to become a model indigenous-serving institution. She also discussed UH Hilo’s efforts to develop a campus plan.

Keiki Kawaiʻaeʻa, director of Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, led a hard-hat tour of Haleʻōlelo, the new College of Hawaiian Language facilities currently under construction.

Representatives from Kamehameha Schools included Stacy Clayton, director of the extension education services division; Alapaki Nahaleʻa, director of community programs on Hawaiʻi island; Brandon Ledward, director of the ʻaina-based education department; Carrie Larger, director of the career and post-high counseling and guidance department; Robert Medeiros, director of the enrichment department; Mark Ellis, director of program support; Kerri-Ann Hewett-Fraser, program manager; and Hannah Pau and Heidi Dangaran, program managers on Hawaiʻi island.

“Bee-coming Sustainable,” a community event held at UH Hilo Farm Laboratory

Beekeeping and sustainable agriculture were the focus of a fun community event held at UH Hilo’s Farm Laboratory in Pana‘ewa.

Alan Wong
Chef Alan Wong with some of the school children who attended the Bee-coming Sustainable community event. (Left to right) Milla, Kamalei, and Ihilani Sakai; Alan Wong; Sunday and Cricket Miura; Irie Sakai.
UH Hilo student
(Left to right) Laurie Jahraus and Samuel Clubb, UH Hilo students and scholarship recipients, demonstrate the process of uncapping to Mr. and Mrs. Ikeda who drove in from Kona for the event. An electric uncapping knife is used to cut through the wax cappings so the honey can be extracted.

Beekeeping and sustainable agriculture were the focus of a commmunity event held Feb. 23 at University of Hawai‘i at Hilo’s Farm Laboratory in Pana‘ewa. Hosted by UH Hilo’s College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources, the “Bee-coming Sustainable” event celebrated the “Alan Wong Adopt a Beehive” program, now in its third year. The program is a partnership between Chef Alan Wong and UH Hilo to raise awareness of the critical plight of honey bees and to promote local solutions to sustaining the local honey bee industry. Members of the public can adopt a beehive at the farm lab to support research and development of healthy beehive practices in Hawai‘i.

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Three UH Hilo students were presented with scholarships at the Bee-coming Sustainable event. The scholarships are funded through the “Alan Wong Adopt a Beehive” program. (Left to right) Chancellor Don Straney; scholarship recipients Samuel Clubb, Laurie Jahraus, and Shohei Yamaki; and Chef Alan Wong.

“It was an adopter appreciation event filled with exhibits by my students, visits to the hives, and food samplings with local ingredients prepared by Chef Wong and his team,” says Lorna Tstutumi, professor of entomology who has taught beekeeping at UH Hilo for over 30 years.

Also celebrated at the event were three UH Hilo students from the agriculture college who were each presented a $1,000 “Adopt-a-Beehive with Alan Wong Scholarship.” The scholarships are made possible through the generous support of donors who have joined Chef Alan Wong in adopting beehives at UH Hilo’s Farm Laboratory in Panaʻewa.

The Bee-coming Sustainable event was swarming with school kids. Tstusumi says an anonymous donor gifted a hive this season to the second grade class of E.B. DeSilva, home of the super bees. “The students from the class were invited as donor’s to the event.” she says. The children learned about products made from beeswax such as hand made crayons made with wax extracted from the hives at the farm.

Crayons
At right is Andrea Barton, a UH Hilo student enrolled in Prof. Tsutsumi’s advanced beekeeping course this semester, at the art table with her son Felix. Children at the event learned about and played with handmade crayons made with beeswax extracted from the hives at the farm.
Caption
Chef Alan Wong (left) talks to Mike Cromwell of Wailea Agricultural Group.

This year, the Adopt a Beehive program piloted a project with the Wailea Agricultural Group, a local farm owned by Michael Crowell producing hearts of palm, flowers, fruit and spices.

“We took a UH Hilo hive to his farm and worked with him to teach him beekeeping, though he already had some experience,” says Tsutsumi. “He brought the frames of honey from that hive collected by the UH Hilo bees that had pollinated his crops to the event for extraction. The lemons in the lemonade that was served came from Wailea Ag and were pollinated by the UH Hilo bees. The program is trying to get more out into the community to teach the importance of integrating bees to increase pollination.”

Photos courtesy of the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources. Used with permission.

Scholarship benefits student beekeepers and promotes sustainable agriculture

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Left to right, Chancellor Donald Straney; scholarship recipients Samuel Clubb, Laurie Jahraus, and Shohei Yamaki; and Chef Alan Wong.”

Three University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo students from the College of Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resource Management have been selected to each receive an Adopt-a-Beehive with Alan Wong Scholarship. The recipients are Samuel Clubb, Laurie Jahraus, and Shohei Yamaki. The awards were presented Feb. 23 at the “Bee-coming Sustainable” event held at UH Hilo’s Farm Laboratory in Panaʻewa

The three $1000 scholarships are made possible through the generous support of donors who have joined Chef Alan Wong in adopting beehives at UH Hilo’s Farm Laboratory in Panaʻewa in the 2012-2013 school year. Launched in the fall of 2011, the Adopt-a-Beehive with Alan Wong program builds awareness of the critical plight of honey bees and promotes local solutions to sustaining the honey bee industry.

All three students successfully completed UH Hilo’s introductory beekeeping course (Entomology 262) during the fall semester, learning to take care of beehives and to extract honey, while communicating with their assigned beehive adopters. They qualified for the scholarship by demonstrating a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher and enrolling in advanced beekeeping (Entomology 350) for the spring semester.

Lorna Tsutsumi, professor of entomology, has taught the beekeeping curriculum at UH Hilo for over thirty years.

“Through the partnership with Alan Wong, the program is achieving a set of common beneficial goals,” says Tsutsumi. “We are supporting UH Hilo students and the next generation of students, giving students the opportunity to share their education with the lifelong learners in our community, and creating public awareness of the importance of the honey bee and beekeeping.”

Column by the Chancellor in Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce Newsletter: Feb. 2013

Message from UH Hilo Chancellor Donald O. Straney
Chamber Connection Newsletter
Hawai‘i Island Chamber of Commerce

February 2013

Veterans to Farmers Program

HICCI recently attended graduation ceremonies for the first cohort of the Veterans to Farmers pilot training program. Fourteen graduates received their training certificates in Waimea on Jan. 5 at an event attended by family, friends, and Hawai‘i island and state dignitaries including representatives, senators, Mayor Billy Kenoi and Governor Neil Abercrombie.

The Veterans to Farmers training program is a community-based pilot initiative that will soon evolve into a new UH Hilo Certificate in Agriculture program designed solely for U.S. military veterans. The program will provide a hands-on farming skills training curriculum, classroom-based business training, business start-up support, and health monitoring for veterans. Once the curriculum is formally approved by the Veterans Benefits Administration of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs, the UH Hilo certificate program will be eligible for veterans to use their GI Bill education benefits. Local organizers are currently working with the VA on a start date of UH Hilo’s certificate program.

The State Department of Labor—and its director Dwight Takamine in particular—has been instrumental in launching Hawai‘i’s Veterans to Farmers program. Partners in facilitating the program are Rivertop Energy Solutions (a project-planning firm run by David Ruf assisting with development of the initiative), Hawai‘i Community College, the State Department of Agriculture, the Department of Hawaiian Homelands, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Mealani Research Station, the Pu‘ukapu Agricultural Community Facility, Native Hawaiian leaders and organizations, several community-based groups, Wow Farm and other local farmers in Waimea on the Big Island. UH Hilo faculty provided technical assistance in the pilot training program.

A key goal of the UH Hilo certificate program will be to enable veterans to develop the necessary skills to farm while also addressing the difficulties many face in transitioning back to civilian life after military service. Completion of the certificate program can enable veterans to create new farm businesses, and to meet the requirements to acquire the leases and loans needed to start a farm. Some participants who complete the certificate program will be ready to pursue a bachelor’s degree at UH Hilo in addition to becoming farmers.

A lot of the hands-on field training in the pilot program—such as greenhouse building—took place at Wow Farms in Waimea, and that type activity will continue once the UH Hilo Certificate in Agriculture is underway. UH Hilo faculty and lecturers will teach the credit courses in Waimea, and the lab requirements—chemical analysis labs and so forth—will be held at UH Hilo’s North Hawai‘i Education and Research Center in Honoka‘a.

There will be seven baccalaureate level courses required including Value Added Ag Products or Man’s Food, Agro-Environmental Chemistry, Sustainable Agriculture, Student Managed Farm Enterprise Project or Directed Work Experience Program, Farm Management, Farm Power, and Principles of Horticulture. Flexibility will be built into the program for substitutions, so, for instance, if a student wants to focus on raising cattle, his or her curriculum could be adjusted to give the student the proper education to meet those business goals.

The Veterans to Farmers program is good for veterans and good for the state. Farmers will play a crucial role in the future economic stability of our island and our state as we move toward food security. The U.S. Veterans Benefits Administration wants to see veterans earn advanced degrees to open up opportunities that allow for full participation in society. The Veterans to Farmers program gives veterans the education they need to create their own small businesses on their own farms—it gives them work in which to thrive while supporting their families. I see great potential for this program to grow and expand throughout our island and state.

Aloha,
Don Straney

Veterans to Farmers pilot training program graduates first cohort

Pilot Veterans to Farmers program is a community-based initiative that will evolve into a new UH Hilo certificate in agriculture designed solely for U.S. military veterans.

The first cohort of the Veterans to Farmers certificate program.
The first cohort of the Veterans to Farmers training program.
A graduate receives her certificate and congratulations.
A graduate of pilot training program receives congratulations.

Chancellor Don Straney recently attended graduation ceremonies for the first cohort of the Veterans to Farmers training program. The 14 graduates received their training certificates in Waimea on Jan 5 at an event attended by family, friends, and Hawai‘i island and state dignitaries including representatives, senators, Mayor Billy Kenoi, and Governor Neil Abercrombie.

The Hawaii Tribune-Herald reports:

Among Saturday’s attendees was University of Hawaii at Hilo Chancellor Don Straney, who described the program as an “anti-plantation.”

“A crucial question is, how do we recruit the next generation of agri-business people?” Straney said. “After the (sugar) plantations left, farming has almost become a dirty word. … We’re showing them that that’s not the kind of farming we’re doing today. They’re not working for someone else’s farm. They’re creating their own small business from the land. Something to thrive with, and to support their family.”

The Veterans to Farmers training program is a community-based pilot initiative that will evolve into a new UH Hilo certificate in agriculture designed solely for U.S. military veterans. The program will provide hands-on farming skills training curriculum, classroom-based business training, business start-up support, and health monitoring for veterans. Once the curriculum is formally approved by the Veterans Administration, the UH Hilo certificate program will be eligible for veterans to use their GI Bill education benefits. A start date of the UH Hilo certificate program has not yet been finalized with the VA.

Veterans to Farmers
Governor Neil Abercrombie and other dignitaries stand with a graduate of the training program.

Partners in facilitating the Veterans to Farmers program are Rivertop Energy Solutions (a project-planning firm assisting with development of the initiative), Hawai‘i Community College, the State Department of Agriculture, the Department of Labor, the Department of Hawaiian Homelands, the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, Mealani Research Station, the Pu‘ukapu Agricultural Community Facility, Native Hawaiian leaders and organizations, several community-based groups, Wow Farm and other local farmers in Waimea on the Big Island. UH Hilo’s involvement in this first pilot training program was limited to technical advice.

A key goal of the UH Hilo certificate program will be to enable veterans to develop the necessary skills to farm while also addressing the difficulties many face in transitioning back to civilian life after military service. Completion of the program can enable veterans to create new farm businesses, and to meet the requirements to acquire the leases and loans needed to start a farm. Some participants who complete the certificate program will be ready to pursue a bachelor’s degree at UH Hilo in addition to becoming farmers.

One of the goals of this graduating cohort is to become teachers for subsequent cohorts. A group of community leaders and government officials met after the day’s festivities to talk about expanding the training program to Molokai.

Training in greenhouse building and grants to pay for greenhouse materials for every participants who needs financial assistance are part of the extensive program.
Graduates showed their skills in building greenhouses as part of graduation day activities. Training in greenhouse building and grants to pay for greenhouse materials for every student-farmer who needs financial assistance are part of the Veterans to Farmers program.