Apr 222015
 

The issues being discussed are very important to us all and I encourage each of you to listen, learn, and share your opinion in a respectful way.

By Chancellor Don Straney

Hilo sealA healthy university is one that embraces diverse subject matter, wide debate, and constructive argument. The recent events on Maunakea prompted by the start of construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope have greatly affected some members of our University of Hawai‘i at Hilo ‘ohana and others from our island and state. At UH Hilo, we respect the right of people to express themselves peacefully, and we have hosted several events this past month designed to help the UH community and the general public understand the varying perspectives and viewpoints about Maunakea.

Kapu aloha 

Early in April, we hosted a panel discussion to explore the concept of “kapu aloha” for the mountain. Three women were on the panel: Manulani Aluli Meyer, a former associate professor of education at UH Hilo and world scholar-practitioner of Hawaiian and indigenous epistemology; Luana Busby-Neff from Molokai, a founder of the Protect Kaho‘olawe ‘Ohana; and Ngahiraka Mason, a senior curator of Maori art from Aotearoa, who gave us an intimate summary of her own experience and understanding of relationships to mountains.

This two-hour community meeting was attended by 80-plus people, who learned that kapu aloha is a discipline that teaches compassion and aloha for all, especially for those who are perceived to be polar to the cause. As Manulani expresses, “A kapu aloha helps us intentionalize our thoughts, words and deeds without harm to others. It honors the energy and life found in aloha, compassion, and helps us focus on its ultimate purpose and meaning.”

Teach-in

Later in the month, the Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani College of Hawaiian Language held a “teach in” about Maunakea with their students and invited the upper classes of two immersion schools. It was an informational and enrichment day for getting to know more about Maunakea, share cultural connections and examples of strategies for action taken from traditional Hawaiian stories and documented Hawaiian history, as well as information about the current history of astronomy on the mountain.

The purpose was to impart information to students — the future leaders of our communities — in a nonjudgmental fashion, and then let them form their own opinions about the current debate.

BOR meeting

About the same time, the UH Board of Regents held a special meeting at UH Hilo to hear about the management of Maunakea and the Maunakea Science Reserve. Public testimony on the current debate about TMT was welcomed and 61 members of the UH Hilo community and the general public presented their views.

There was a lot of respect and aloha shown by everyone who attended the BOR meeting (standing room only in our largest lecture hall) and we listened carefully as presentations occasionally included direct criticism and pointed challenges to the BOR and UH.

As I write this, the board has scheduled a follow-up meeting at UH Hilo for Sunday, April 26, to continue hearing testimony.

Respect and aloha

I believe it is important to provide opportunities for our students, faculty, staff and the local community to gather together at events like these to learn from many different sources about the events unfolding on Maunakea. This type of discussion and debate is what a university is for.

The issues being discussed are very important to us all and I encourage each of you to listen, learn, and share your opinion in a respectful way. Our respect and aloha for one another will guide us well as we move forward.

Aloha,

Don Straney

Mahalo

 Posted by
Apr 202015
 

I’d like to express deepest appreciation to the individuals whose efforts ensured the two Board of Regents meetings last Thursday went smoothly.

Hilo sealAloha,

On behalf of the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo, I’d like to express deepest appreciation to the individuals whose efforts ensured the two Board of Regents meetings last Thursday went smoothly.

I’d like to expressly thank the teamwork of Walter Dudoit, Darrel Mayfield, Kolin Kettleson, Miles Nagata, Ken Fukamizu, Melodie Agbayani, Marcia Heller, Anthony Liu and Matt Baldin who did a fantastic job.

I’d also like to recognize Lai Bugado, Lisa Mendoza, Randy Hirokawa, Farrah Gomes, Norm Arancon, Chris Frueh, Charmaine Higa-McMillan, Marina Karides and others who worked with the team to relocate classes and events to accommodate the change in venues.

The positive manner and teamwork that you and others provided made the rest of us proud of having you in the UH Hilo ‘ohana.

Mahalo for all your support.

Don Straney
Chancellor

Apr 142015
 

On April 23 and 24, the Ibis Networks will be on campus to install the devices.

Aloha,

InteliSocket

InteliSocket

University of Hawai‘i at Hilo is moving forward with efforts to make our campus more sustainable, especially in areas that reduce our costs.

To that end, we need good baseline information to show results from our efforts and are beginning a program to measure electricity use by many of the machines, appliances and instruments on campus. The value of this information for developing energy reduction strategies was demonstrated in a Sustainability Committee pilot project two years ago.

On April 23 and 24, the Ibis Networks will be on campus to install approximately 500 InteliSocket devices. These devices will allow UH Hilo to capture and analyze usage data on PCs, accessories, copiers, refrigerators, microwave, coffee makers, drinking fountains, window a/c, vending machines, teaching and research lab equipment, exercise equipment, etc.

Tentatively, the following areas will be affected by this project:

  • EKH 2nd floor: Computer labs, CoBE office, Spatial imaging office and lab, and general offices
  • EKH Ground Floor: 5 Classrooms
  • Marine Science Building: Lab equipment, refrigerators, freezers and general offices
  • PB 8/8A: Window a/c and music equipment
  • SLC: Exercise equipment and office equipment
  • Hale Alahonua

Mahalo,

Don Straney

Apr 082015
 

Discussion on understanding mauna, culture and intention throughout moana-nui-akea. A hui wānana to explore insights, practices and clarity for these times.

Maunakea

Maunakea

The Hoʻokahua Project of the Office of the Chancellor, and Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center, will be hosting the following presentation on the campus of the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo:

E Nihi Kahele: Maintaining Kapu Aloha for Mauna Kea

DATE: Thursday, April 9, 2015
TIME: 5:00 – 8:00 pm
PLACE: University Classroom Building, room 100, UH Hilo campus

Free and open to the UH community and the general public.

SPEAKERS:

  • Manulani Aluli Meyer, Moʻokapu, UH Hilo Kanilehua Visiting Scholar.
  • Luana Busby-Neff, Molokai, Hawaiian Force, PKO, Moʻopapa.
  • Ngahiraka Mason, Aotearoa, Tuhoe, Senior Curator Maori Art.

A discussion on understanding mauna, culture and intention throughout moana-nui-akea. A hui wānana to explore insights, practices and clarity for these times.

Come to understand the focus of our kapu aloha – a synonym for ahimsa. Because of the needs of our time, and the distortion of stories flying around the globe, come to listen to what is really happening to those who have been dedicated to aloha ʻāina our whole lives and who are now lending this focus to Maunakea. –Manulani Aluli Meyer

For more information on this presentation, contact Kīpuka at 932-7418. For disability accommodation contact Darlene Iokepa at 932-7418 (V), 932-7002 (TTY).

Update: See story and photos about the event, UH Hilo Stories, April 13, “Manulani Aluli Meyer: Kapu Aloha for Maunakea, a discipline of compassion.”

Apr 082015
 

The purpose of the Chancellor’s Professional Development Fund is to provide opportunities for continued professional growth and development for faculty and staff.

Hilo sealApplications for 2015-2016 Chancellor’s Professional Development Funds are now being accepted at the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. The application form, rubric and guidelines are available on the Professional Development website.

The purpose of the Chancellor’s Professional Development Fund is to provide opportunities for continued professional growth and development for faculty and staff, with a special emphasis on development that will have far-reaching impacts on the campus.

The deadline for submission of applications is Monday, April 27, 2015 at 4:00 p.m. Applications may be emailed (see contact info on the Professional Development website) or dropped off attention to Claire Shigeoka, PDC co-chair, at Human Resources, Auxiliary Services Building, Room 106.

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